Cover image for Flight of the Sparrow
Title:
Flight of the Sparrow

A Novel of Early America
Author:
Brown, Amy Belding
Subject:
Fiction
Literature
Romance
Historical Fiction
Description:
"A compelling, emotionally gripping"* novel of historical fiction—perfect for readers of America's First Daughter.Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1676. Even before Mary Rowlandson was captured by Indians on a winter day of violence and terror, she sometimes found herself in conflict with her rigid Puritan community. Now, her home destroyed, her children lost to her, she has been sold into the service of a powerful woman tribal leader, made a pawn in the ongoing bloody struggle between English settlers and native people. Battling cold, hunger, and exhaustion, Mary witnesses harrowing brutality but also unexpected kindness. To her confused surprise, she is drawn to her captors' open and straightforward way of life, a feeling further complicated by her attraction to a generous, protective English-speaking native known as James Printer. All her life, Mary has been taught to fear God, submit to her husband, and abhor Indians. Now, having lived on the other side of the forest, she begins to question the edicts that have guided her, torn between the life she knew and the wisdom the natives have shown her. Based on the compelling true narrative of Mary Rowlandson, Flight of the Sparrow is an evocative tale that transports the reader to a little-known time in early America and explores the real meanings of freedom, faith, and acceptance. READERS GUIDE INCLUDED
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group

Berkley
Date:
2014/07/01
Digital Format:
Adobe EPUB

HTML

Kindle
Language:
English

Summary

Summary

"A compelling, emotionally gripping"* novel of historical fiction--perfect for readers of America's First Daughter .

Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1676 . Even before Mary Rowlandson was captured by Indians on a winter day of violence and terror, she sometimes found herself in conflict with her rigid Puritan community. Now, her home destroyed, her children lost to her, she has been sold into the service of a powerful woman tribal leader, made a pawn in the ongoing bloody struggle between English settlers and native people.

Battling cold, hunger, and exhaustion, Mary witnesses harrowing brutality but also unexpected kindness. To her confused surprise, she is drawn to her captors' open and straightforward way of life, a feeling further complicated by her attraction to a generous, protective English-speaking native known as James Printer. All her life, Mary has been taught to fear God, submit to her husband, and abhor Indians. Now, having lived on the other side of the forest, she begins to question the edicts that have guided her, torn between the life she knew and the wisdom the natives have shown her.

Based on the compelling true narrative of Mary Rowlandson, Flight of the Sparrow is an evocative tale that transports the reader to a little-known time in early America and explores the real meanings of freedom, faith, and acceptance.

READERS GUIDE INCLUDED


Author Notes

Amy Belding Brown received an undergraduate degree from Bates College and a Master of Fine Arts degree from Vermont College of Norwich University. Shortly after graduating with her masters, she joined the staff of Orchard House, the house museum in Concord, Massachusetts where Louisa May Alcott wrote Little Women. She is the author of Mr. Emerson's Wife and Flight of the Sparrow. She teaches writing at Granite State College.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Brown's second novel (after Mr. Emerson's Wife) examines how the early English settlers made their way to the New World, built their communities, and related to the established Native American culture. The author retells the real-life story of Mary Rolandson (1637-1711), a resident of an outpost town in 1600s Massachusetts, who was taken in an Indian raid and eventually -restored to English society. After her capture, Mary becomes a slave to a powerful female Indian leader and witnesses savage cruelty as well as kindness. She also enjoys a new freedom she never experienced in her old life. When she is finally returned to her minister husband, Mary is conflicted by the prejudice her community bears against the native peoples even as they are defeated by the English armies and forced into small, guarded encampments. VERDICT Brown has written an engaging and enjoyable novel based on solid research. Students of history may be put off by the trappings of a romance in the story line but will value the authentic representation of early Colonial America and the more sympathetic portrait of Native Americans that is lacking in James -Alexander Thom's similar Follow the River.-Cheryl Bryan, Orleans, MA (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.