Cover image for I, Dred Scott [a fictional slave narrative based on the life and legal precedent of Dred Scott]
Title:
I, Dred Scott [a fictional slave narrative based on the life and legal precedent of Dred Scott]
ISBN:
9781419331787
Publication Information:
Prince Frederick, Md. : Recorded Books, p2005.
Physical Description:
1 sound disc (1 hr., 15 min.) : digital, stereo. ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Unabridged.
Genre:
Added Author:
Summary:
Having served his master in northern states, under the provisions of the Missouri compromise the slave Dred Scott may be eligible for emancipation, but legal obstacles stand in the way of his freedom.
Holds:

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Summary

Summary

I, Dred Scott


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-The legal decision regarding Dred Scott was one of the catalysts of the Civil War. When the highest court in the United States nullified the Missouri Compromise that had kept the entire slavery issue in fragile balance, lines were drawn in the sand, and war soon followed. This book, written by Sheila P. Moses (Margaret McElderry Books, 2005), introduces children to the man behind the decision. Told in the first person, in dialect, it follows Dred Scott from his unrecorded birth as a slave through a variety of owners, and the 11-year battle to win freedom for himself and his family. The notorious decision consigning him to slavery is presented, and his subsequent emancipation is explained. Told in a journal format, this episodic account makes an historical figure come to life. Children will hear the matter-of-factness of slave life and, hopefully, cringe that such an institution was ever commonly accepted. Most of Scott's owners were not especially cruel, but it is clear that his life was not his own and that fact becomes more and more abhorrent as the story proceeds. The foreword by Dred Scott's great-grandson ties the account to modern times, and an essay at the end explains more fully the impact of the Dred Scott decision. Peter Jay Fernandez reads the story with expression, his rich voice carrying listeners to another time and place, allowing them to see the world briefly through a slave's eyes. Hopefully, this is a glimpse that youngsters will not soon forget.-Teresa Bateman, Brigadoon Elementary School, Federal Way, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.