Cover image for All quiet on the western front
Title:
All quiet on the western front
Edition:
Full frame version.
Publication Information:
Universal City, CA : Universal Home Video, c2007.
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (2 hr., 12 min.) : sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
"Exclusive introduction by Turner Classic Movies Host and film historian Robert Osborne. "--Cover.

Based on the novel by Erich Maria Remarque.

Originally produced as a motion picture in 1930.

Special features include production notes, cast and filmmakers' biographies, film highlights, theatrical trailer, and Web links.
Summary:
Paul Baumer enlisted with his classmates in the German army of World War I. Youthful, enthusiastic, they become soldiers. But despite what they have learned, they break into pieces under the first bombardment in the trenches. And as horrible war plods on year after year, Paul holds fast to a single vow: to fight against the principles of hate that meaninglessly pits young men of the same generation but different uniforms against each other--if only he can come out of the war alive.
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Summary

One of the most powerful anti-war statements ever put on film, this gut-wrenching story concerns a group of friends who join the Army during World War I and are assigned to the Western Front, where their fiery patriotism is quickly turned to horror and misery by the harsh realities of combat. Director Lewis Milestone pioneered the use of the sweeping crane shot to capture a ghastly battlefield panorama of death and mud, and the cast, led by Lew Ayres, is terrific. It's hard to pick a favorite scene, but the finale, as Ayres stretches from his trench to catch a butterfly, is one of the most devastating sequences of the decade. The film won Oscars for Best Picture and for Milestone's direction -- and trivia buffs should note that the actors were coached by future luminary George Cukor, while Ayres became a conscientious objector in World War II. The Road Back (1937) followed, and the film was remade for television in 1979. ~ Robert Firsching, Rovi