Cover image for The Emancipation Proclamation
Title:
The Emancipation Proclamation
ISBN:
9780792279167
Publication Information:
Washington, D.C. : National Geographic Society, c2006.
Physical Description:
40 p. : ill. (some col.), col. map ; 26 cm.
General Note:
Originally published: 2004.

Includes index.
Personal Subject:
Summary:
This book describes the roots of slavery in the United States, and examines the reasons why certain people and states were for it, while others were opposed to it. It also explains why President Lincoln issued the proclamation when he did, whom the proclamation freed, and whom it did not, and some of the effects it had on future events. Readers learn about the differences between northern and southern economies, how slavery became a states rights issue, how Congress struggled to maintain a balance between free and slave states, and how Lincoln's election forced 11 southern states to leave the Union and hastened the beginning of the Civil War--Publisher.
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Summary

Summary

This book describes the roots of slavery in the United States, and examines the reasons why certain people and states were for it, while others were opposed to it. It also explains why President Lincoln issued the proclamation when he did, whom the proclamation freed, and whom it did not, and some of the effects it had on future events. Readers learn about the differences between northern and southern economies, how slavery became a states rights issue, how Congress struggled to maintain a balance between free and slave states, and how Lincoln's election forced 11 southern states to leave the Union and hastened the beginning of the Civil War. Includes the full text of the Proclamation, the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments, and portions of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850.


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-These titles give clear and concise introductions to two important documents, providing historical context for their creation and comments on their impact throughout history including their place in our society today. The superior layout and illustrations enhance and reinforce the texts through a combination of high-quality reproductions, photographs, artwork, and biographical sidebars. Though Constitution lacks diagrams or maps to help explain some of the more confusing parts of American government, it is ultimately accessible. Pair it with Syl Sobel's more comprehensive The U.S. Constitution and You (Barron's, 2001) or use it to expand study after an introduction with David Catrow's incredible We the Kids (Dial, 2002). Proclamation fills a gap in the small lineup of titles about this important document. Both books will find primary use as research tools, but budding history buffs will undoubtedly be attracted to their glossy pages for browsing. Solid selections for collections in need of history or government resources.-Jill Heritage Maza, Conn Elementary, Raleigh, NC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Horn Book Review

Using short sentences with direct language, these volumes logically and comprehensibly explain the historical context of America's founding documents, unpack the documents' language, and give a brief overview of related, more recent events. A vivid design incorporates photos, historical artwork, artifacts, and sidebars to make the pages colorful and lively. Each document's exact text is found in the appendix. Glos., ind. [Review covers these American Documents titles: The Constitution, The Emancipation Proclamation, The Bill of Rights, and The Declaration of Independence.] (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

Gr. 4-7. This title from the American Documents series focuses on Lincoln's first foray into abolitionism. Many students may not realize that the Emancipation Proclamation didn't end slavery or that Lincoln entered the Civil War to preserve the Union, not necessarily to free slaves. Using a straightforward tone, McComb clearly outlines what the Emancipation Proclamation did (freed slaves in Confederate states) and did not do (end slavery, or free slaves in any state that did not join the Confederacy). Background about slavery and the Civil War provides context for the discussion of the document, and the evolution of Lincoln's thinking about whether and how to end slavery rounds out the account. The differences between the North and the South that precipitated the war are oversimplified, but this volume will still be useful for researching the document itself, and the design, which features archival photos and illustrations in color and black and white, adds appeal. A glossary and full texts of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, and Amendments XIII through XV are appended. Other books in the series include The Mayflower Compact and The Bill of Rights. --Diane Foote Copyright 2006 Booklist