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Cover image for Black music in America : a history through its people
Title:
Black music in America : a history through its people
ISBN:
9780690044607

9780690044621
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication Information:
New York : T.Y. Crowell, c1987.
Physical Description:
198 p. : illustrations ; 24 cm.
General Note:
Includes index.
Summary:
Surveys the history of black music in America, from early slave songs through jazz and the blues to soul, classical music, and current trends.
Holds:

Available:*

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Summary

Summary

Surveys the history of black music in America, from early slave songs through jazz and the blues to soul, classical music, and current trends.


Summary

Surveys the history of black music in America, from early slave songs through jazz and the blues to soul, classical music, and current trends.


Author Notes

Author Jim Haskins was born in Demopolis, Alabama on September 19, 1941. He received a B.A. from Georgetown University in 1960, a B.S. from Alabama State University in 1962, and a M.A. from the University of New Mexico in 1963. After graduation, he became a special education teacher in a public school in Harlem. His first book, Diary of a Harlem School Teacher, was the result of his experience there. He taught at numerous colleges and universities before becoming an English professor at the University of Florida, Gainesville in 1977.

He wrote more than 100 books during his lifetime, ranging from counting books for children to biographies on Rosa Parks, Hank Aaron and Spike Lee. He won numerous awards for his work including the 1976 Coretta Scott King Award for The Story of Stevie Wonder, the 1984 Coretta Scott King Award for Lena Horne, the 1979 ASCAP Deems Taylor Award for Scott Joplin: The Man Who Made Ragtime; and the 1994 Washington Post Children's Book Guide Award. He also won the Carter G. Woodson Award for young adult non-fiction for Black Music in America; The March on Washington; and Carter G. Woodson: The Man Who Put "Black" in American History in 1989, 1994, and 2001, respectively. He died from complications of emphysema on July 6, 2005 at the age of 63.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Author Jim Haskins was born in Demopolis, Alabama on September 19, 1941. He received a B.A. from Georgetown University in 1960, a B.S. from Alabama State University in 1962, and a M.A. from the University of New Mexico in 1963. After graduation, he became a special education teacher in a public school in Harlem. His first book, Diary of a Harlem School Teacher, was the result of his experience there. He taught at numerous colleges and universities before becoming an English professor at the University of Florida, Gainesville in 1977.

He wrote more than 100 books during his lifetime, ranging from counting books for children to biographies on Rosa Parks, Hank Aaron and Spike Lee. He won numerous awards for his work including the 1976 Coretta Scott King Award for The Story of Stevie Wonder, the 1984 Coretta Scott King Award for Lena Horne, the 1979 ASCAP Deems Taylor Award for Scott Joplin: The Man Who Made Ragtime; and the 1994 Washington Post Children's Book Guide Award. He also won the Carter G. Woodson Award for young adult non-fiction for Black Music in America; The March on Washington; and Carter G. Woodson: The Man Who Put "Black" in American History in 1989, 1994, and 2001, respectively. He died from complications of emphysema on July 6, 2005 at the age of 63.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up This history of black music provides an admirable parade of musicians and related personalities as it unfolds through their life stories. Linkages and relationships are smoothly styled to move readers from unknown historical figures to contemporary, highly visible performers. A critical aspect of this history is the deplorable social atmosphere of racism, sexism, and economic deprivation which characterized the earliest times, and to some extent, contemporary times. Despite the searing psychological stresses that were imposed by some derogatory stage names, infamously low wages, and inadequate, if any, guest accomodations, these artists persisted to create an amazing range of music that includes jazz, bebop, vocal, gospel, classical, operatic, and music videos. Despite his clear writing style, Haskins appears ambivalent regarding the implication of segregation in the music business. ``By and large, people involved in the world of music were more interested in music than in skin color'' raises questions when compared to later pages which feature statements such as ``very segregated,'' ``considerable white resistance,'' ``music business was still highly segregated.'' He seems to favor male musicians, as exemplified in the very brief attention given to women including Billie Holliday and Marian Anderson. The basis of Haskins' selections is not explained. Nevertheless, this book will enhance music collections for young readers. Helen E. Williams, University of Maryland, College Park (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

This is much more than a survey of styles and personalities. A study of the music of an oppressed and segregated people must necessarily be a study of that experience. James Haskins vividly conveys the inseparable bond between black life in a predominantly white society and the music that results. His survey begins with the instruments and voices of the slaves. The music grew from there in many directions: the blues, jazz, ragtime, R & B, soul and rock 'n' roll. Detailed and authoritative, the writing is always clear and direct. Haskins combines historical fact, an individual story and the elusive mood of the music itself, in a lively, often moving book. (Photos not seen by PW.) Ages 12-up. (April) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Integrating biographies of leading composers and performers with a general history, Haskins traces how black music developed and how it influenced other musical traditions. From slave songs and early minstrel shows to ragtime, blues, jazz, soul, and disco, he relates the music to black social history, beginning with the folk roots in work songs and spirituals and describing times and places in which the music flourished, from New Orleans and Chicago to the Harlem Renaissance. Though Haskins is clear about the racism that often kept musicians out of the mainstream, he discusses vocalists, such as Leontyne Price, who made it in the classical music world, and phenomenally popular 1980s successes, such as Michael Jackson. The best chapters deal with the blues and jazz, showing how the giants Billie Holiday, Jelly Roll Morton, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and many others fit into a rich tradition. The format is handsome, with photographs of soloists and groups. There is no discography, and although most quotations are attributed to sources mentioned in the long bibliography, there are no footnotes. Index. Gr. 7-12. HR. 781.7'296073 Afro-Americans Music History and criticism / Music History and criticism [CIP] 85-47885


School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up This history of black music provides an admirable parade of musicians and related personalities as it unfolds through their life stories. Linkages and relationships are smoothly styled to move readers from unknown historical figures to contemporary, highly visible performers. A critical aspect of this history is the deplorable social atmosphere of racism, sexism, and economic deprivation which characterized the earliest times, and to some extent, contemporary times. Despite the searing psychological stresses that were imposed by some derogatory stage names, infamously low wages, and inadequate, if any, guest accomodations, these artists persisted to create an amazing range of music that includes jazz, bebop, vocal, gospel, classical, operatic, and music videos. Despite his clear writing style, Haskins appears ambivalent regarding the implication of segregation in the music business. ``By and large, people involved in the world of music were more interested in music than in skin color'' raises questions when compared to later pages which feature statements such as ``very segregated,'' ``considerable white resistance,'' ``music business was still highly segregated.'' He seems to favor male musicians, as exemplified in the very brief attention given to women including Billie Holliday and Marian Anderson. The basis of Haskins' selections is not explained. Nevertheless, this book will enhance music collections for young readers. Helen E. Williams, University of Maryland, College Park (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

This is much more than a survey of styles and personalities. A study of the music of an oppressed and segregated people must necessarily be a study of that experience. James Haskins vividly conveys the inseparable bond between black life in a predominantly white society and the music that results. His survey begins with the instruments and voices of the slaves. The music grew from there in many directions: the blues, jazz, ragtime, R & B, soul and rock 'n' roll. Detailed and authoritative, the writing is always clear and direct. Haskins combines historical fact, an individual story and the elusive mood of the music itself, in a lively, often moving book. (Photos not seen by PW.) Ages 12-up. (April) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Integrating biographies of leading composers and performers with a general history, Haskins traces how black music developed and how it influenced other musical traditions. From slave songs and early minstrel shows to ragtime, blues, jazz, soul, and disco, he relates the music to black social history, beginning with the folk roots in work songs and spirituals and describing times and places in which the music flourished, from New Orleans and Chicago to the Harlem Renaissance. Though Haskins is clear about the racism that often kept musicians out of the mainstream, he discusses vocalists, such as Leontyne Price, who made it in the classical music world, and phenomenally popular 1980s successes, such as Michael Jackson. The best chapters deal with the blues and jazz, showing how the giants Billie Holiday, Jelly Roll Morton, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and many others fit into a rich tradition. The format is handsome, with photographs of soloists and groups. There is no discography, and although most quotations are attributed to sources mentioned in the long bibliography, there are no footnotes. Index. Gr. 7-12. HR. 781.7'296073 Afro-Americans Music History and criticism / Music History and criticism [CIP] 85-47885


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