Cover image for I spy super challenger! : a book of picture riddles
Title:
I spy super challenger! : a book of picture riddles
ISBN:
9780439684309

9780590341288

9780439910910
Edition:
Reinforced library ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic, 2005
Physical Description:
31 p. : col. ill. ; 32 cm.
Series:
Contents:
Flight of fancy -- Tiny toys -- Chain reaction -- City blocks -- Silhouettes -- Storybook theatre -- The hidden clue -- Stocking stuffers -- Peanuts and popcorn -- 1, 2, 3 -- A whale of a tale -- Toys in the attic -- Extra credit riddles.
Added Author:
Summary:
Rhyming verses ask readers to find hidden objects in the photographs. Contains the objects most difficult to find in the previous books.
Holds:

Available:*

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On Order

Summary

Summary



Spectacularly photographed...cleverly written. Sure to be as successful as its predecessors.


Author Notes

Jean Marzollo was born Jean Martin in Manchester, Connecticut on June 25, 1942. She graduated from the University of Connecticut in 1964, and received a master's degree in teaching from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 1965. After graduating, she taught high school English for several years and then became involved in educational publishing. She was the editor of Scholastic's kindergarten magazine Let's Find Out for twenty years.

Her first book for parents, Learning Through Play, was published in 1972 and her first children's book, Close Your Eyes, was published in 1978. She wrote over 150 books for children and has illustrated some of her own children's books starting in 2003. Her works include the I Spy series; Soccer Sam; Mama Mama/Papa Papa; Close Your Eyes; Happy Birthday, Martin Luther King; and the Shanna Show books. She died in her sleep of natural causes on April 10, 2018 at the age of 75.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 4‘Wick's spectacularly photographed, double-page spreads are taken from favorites such as I Spy Funhouse (1993) and I Spy School Days (1995, both Scholastic). Marzollo's cleverly written new rhyming couplets encourage readers to seek a new batch of items. Playing cards, beads, dominos, blocks, and other trinkets are all arranged attractively and with wit, yet this does not lessen the difficulty of locating the sought-after objects. Extending the usefulness of what might otherwise be a "once through" book are the "Extra Credit Riddles"‘couplets that refer back to the pictures on the earlier pages, but for which no specific page is identified. Just as Marzollo created new riddles for this book, children are invited to create more rhymes and riddles of their own based on the pictures.‘Linda Greengrass, Bank Street College Library, New York City (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Horn Book Review

With an uninspired rhyming text that asks readers to hunt for objects hidden in the double-page spreads, this book is a collection of 'classic' photographs from previously published I Spy volumes. As with the other titles in the series, this book will appeal to picture-puzzle fans, but there's not a lot of novelty here. From HORN BOOK 1992, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 4^-7. Ready for a challenge? The newest entry in the popular series won't disappoint I Spy enthusiasts. The trademark rhyming riddles lead sharp-eyed readers to objects in crisp photographs. Finding a needle in a haystack is fun among charms, beads, and toys placed in creative, eye-dazzling arrangements. Wick's painstakingly prepared illustrations--bright, elaborate, and wonderfully thematic--strike a great balance between shape and color. Marzollo inspires further creativity in children by encouraging them to write their own riddles. Although geared to the patient, detail-oriented child, this entry is sure to be as popular as its predecessors. --Kathleen Squires