Cover image for Underground man
Title:
Underground man
ISBN:
9780152055240

9780152055189
Edition:
1st Harcourt Young Classics ed.
Publication Information:
Orlando, Fla. : Harcourt, 2006.
Physical Description:
261 p. : map ; 20 cm.
General Note:
Reprint. Originally published: Scarsdale, N.Y. : Bradbury Press, 1972.
Reading Level:
760 L Lexile
Summary:
A courageous young white man aids slaves escaping from Kentucky in pre-Civil War days.
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Summary

Summary

In this classic novel, Josh, a teenage logger on the Ohio River, discovers his life's true mission as an abolitionist after his first encounter with a runaway slave.

Josh first attempts to spread the abolitionist message by lecturing in remote towns about the evils of slavery--but his views often ignite strong disapproval. Frustrated, he makes a more daring choice and becomes an agent of the Underground Railroad. After dozens of successful rescues, Josh is captured by Kentucky slave owners and convicted of "enticing slaves to leave their owners."

Locked away, he struggles to hold on to his ideals and sense of self. But when freedom comes sooner than he expected, Josh must decide if he will again take the kind of risks that landed him in prison.


Author Notes

Historian Milton Meltzer was born in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1915. He attended Columbia University, but had to leave during his senior year because of the Great Depression. He got a job writing for the WPA Federal Theater Project. During World War II, he served as an air traffic controller in the Army Air Corps. After the war, he worked as a writer for CBS radio and in public relations for Pfizer.

In 1956, he published his first book A Pictorial History of the Negro American, which was co-written by Langston Hughes. They also collaborated on Langston Hughes: A Biography, which was published in 1968 and received the Carter G. Woodson award. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 110 books for young people including Brother, Can You Spare a Dime? about the stock market crash that led to the Great Depression; Never to Forget about the Holocaust; and There Comes a Time about the Civil Rights movement. He also addressed such topics as crime, ancient Egypt, the immigrant experience, labor movements, photography, piracy, poverty, racism, and slavery. He wrote numerous biographies including ones on Mary McLeod Bethune, Lydia Maria Child, Dorothea Lange, Margaret Sanger, and Henry David Thoreau. He received the 2000 Regina Medal and the 2001 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for his body of work and his lasting contribution to children's literature. He died of esophageal cancer on September 19, 2009 at the age of 94.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Horn Book Review

by Bradbury. An action-packed, thought-provoking novel based on the life of an actual nineteenth-century white abolitionist includes a lengthy afterword on Meltzer's research and on the differences between fiction and history. From HORN BOOK 1990, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.