Cover image for The golden rule
Title:
The golden rule
ISBN:
9780810909601

9781428735897
Publication Information:
New York : Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2007.
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 27 cm.
Reading Level:
AD 490 L Lexile
Summary:
Grandpa explains that the golden rule is a simple statement on how to live that can be practiced by people of all ages and faiths, then helps his grandson figure out how to apply the rule to his own life.
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Summary

Summary

This book is a gentle reminder of a timeless rule for parent and child: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.Everyone knows a version of the Golden Rule. But what does it really mean? And how do you follow it? In this gorgeously illustrated book, a grandfather explains to his grandson that the Golden Rule means you "treat people the way you would like to be treated. It's golden because it's so valuable, and a way of living your life that's so simple, it shines." And though it may be a simple rule, it isn't easy to follow. Fortunately, following the Golden Rule is something everyone can do, which means that every person--old or young, rich or poor--can be a part of making the world a better place.F&P level: O


Author Notes

Ilene Cooper has written many children's books, including Sam I Am and Absolutely Lucy. She is the editor for Booklist.


Reviews 5

Publisher's Weekly Review

Visually energetic paintings and a reassuring story fortify Cooper's (Jewish Holidays All Year Round) assertion (in an author's note) that the Golden Rule is an "underlying moral principle found in almost every religion and culture." A boy and his grandfather observe the phrase "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you" on a billboard and begin to discuss the meaning of the words. By turns philosophical and literal, the grandfather explains that the rule is simple but not easy, that it holds true for children as well as adults, and that at its core the rule is "golden because it's so valuable, and a way of living your life that's so simple, it shines." Woven into this intergenerational exchange, Cooper offers interpretations of how the rule is stated in the holy books of Christianity, Buddhism, Islam and other major religions. As complement, Swiatowska (My Name Is Yoon) serves up elegant, textured imagery from each religion and warm portraits of grandfather and grandson in her arresting illustrations. Though the text slightly devolves into didacticism when the boy and his grandfather discuss putting the rule into practice, many readers will appreciate the otherwise straightforward tone and universality of the material, and may well ponder the book's message. Ages 4-8. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

A boy and his grandfather engage in conversation about the Golden Rule after they see it posted on a billboard. The straightforward but sometimes repetitive text keeps the discussion on a level understandable for children but can't entirely avoid the didacticism inherent in the subject. Evocative paintings (some from startling angles) incorporate imagery from various religious traditions, underscoring the rule's universality. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

Editor's note: It is Booklist policy that a book written or edited by a staff editor receive a brief descriptive announcement rather than a review. The Golden Rule-do unto others as you would have them do unto you-is simple yet profound. In this picture book, a boy and his grandfather are out walking when the child sees the words written on a wall. The two talk about what it means. The grandfather explains that the Golden Rule means you ""treat people the way you would like to be treated. It's golden because it's so valuable, and a way of living your life that's so simple, it shines."" Though it may be a simple rule, it isn't easy to follow, but the boy comes to see how every religion and culture has a version of the Golden Rule and how much better the world would be if only the rule was practiced by individuals--and by nations, too.-- Copyright 2007 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 5-A nameless boy and his grandfather discuss the meaning of the Golden Rule, its universality, and ways to practice it. Grandfather points out that many religions and cultures, from Christianity to Hinduism to the Shawnee tribe, have their own variations, and he quotes six examples. The boy wonders what the world would be like if more people practiced the Rule, and Grandfather explains that "It begins with you." The rich, golden paintings and large format reinforce the importance of the topic. The cherubic boy and his old-fashioned grandfather gaze solemnly out of the pages, making eye contact with readers and inviting them into the discussion. Swirling patterns of animal shapes and symbols from various traditions are reminders that the topic is as abstract as the art, with much room for interpretation. This is less a story than a discussion starter, and teachers, parents, and religious leaders will welcome it as a clear introduction to an important subject. While there are more compelling examples throughout children's literature of characters practicing the Golden Rule, from Frances Hodgson Burnett's A Little Princess to Chris Raschka's Yo! Yes? (Scholastic, 1993), there are few titles that address the concept so directly.-Heidi Estrin, Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel, Boca Raton, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Presented as a conversation between grandfather and grandson, this accessible examination of the Golden Rule and its age-old cross-cultural relevance can't help but wax didactic. The boy, walking with his grandfather, asks what a billboard says. "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you," the elder responds. "It's golden because it's so valuable, and a way of living your life that's so simple, it shines." As the pair discusses how young and old might live by the rule, which appears in so many religions' "holy books," Swiatowska's full-bleed paintings supply mural-like backdrops. The figures embody an old-world look, with the boy in striped pants, blue jacket and red shoes, and the bearded elder in black suit and hat. The artist incorporates both traditional religious iconography and patterned spreads adorned with birds, flowers and whimsical creatures intentionally disassociated from the text's specificity. Cooper's elegant simplification for young children will appeal to adults seeking ecumenical approaches to values education. (author's note, artist's note) (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.