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Cover image for Madam C.J. Walker : entrepreneur
Title:
Madam C.J. Walker : entrepreneur
ISBN:
9781604130720
Publication Information:
New York : Chelsea House, c2008.
Physical Description:
103 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents:
"Hit often and hit hard" -- Motherless child -- Sarah's dream -- Gearing up -- "My own factory on my own ground" -- "Don't sit down and wait" -- "We should protest" -- "A conference of interest to the race" -- The legacy.
Summary:
Examines the life and career of businesswoman Madam C.J. Walker, the first American woman to become a self-made millionaire.
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Summary

Summary

Madam C.J. Walker, the first woman - black or white - to become a self-made millionaire, started out as a laundress with few prospects. Originally named Sarah Breedlove, she was the first in her formerly enslaved family to be born free. Poor for most of her life, Walker invented a line of hair-care products when she was 37 years old. Eleven years later, she owned and operated her own thriving business, the Madam C. J. Walker Manufacturing Company. She trained thousands of consultants - almost all of them women - who purchased her products for resale to their customers throughout the United States, Central America, and the Caribbean. Through her work, Walker created a legacy of pride and do-it-yourself spirit that still resonates today. Read about this remarkable woman and her legacy in ""Madam C.J. Walker: Entrepreneur"".


Author Notes

A'Lelia Bundles, Madam C.J. Walker's great-great-granddaughter, continues the Walker legacy as a member of several nonprofit boards, including the Madam Walker Theatre Center in Indianapolis, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, the Foundation for the National Archives, and the Columbia University Board of Trustees.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

There could hardly be a more dramatic rags-to-riches biography: the first member of her slave family born free, Walker transformed herself from washerwoman to the wealthiest self-made American businesswoman of her day through the invention, manufacture, and sale of high-quality hair products and treatments for black women. The author is Walker's great-granddaughter, and this biography in the Black Americans of Achievement series tells this extraordinary success story with considerable depth and detail, illustrated with both public and family photos, and bolstered by occasional screens that fill in historical background. Walker's opulent lifestyle is matched with her involvement in the social issues of the day and her commitment to help others as both a philanthropist and political activist with the NAACP and alongside other African American leaders. Her proud descendant sums it up: She made a fortune and gave much of it away. Includes a bibliography of books and Web sites and a chronology, but no sources for direct quotes.--Rochman, Hazel Copyright 2009 Booklist


Excerpts

Excerpts

Madam C.J. Walker, the first woman--black or white--to become a self-made millionaire, started out as a laundress with few prospects. Originally named Sarah Breedlove, she was the first in her formerly enslaved family to be born free. Poor for most of her life, Walker invented a line of hair-care products when she was 37 years old. Eleven years later, she owned and operated her own thriving business, the Madam C. J. Walker Manufacturing Company. She trained thousands of consultants--almost all of them women--who purchased her products for resale to their customers throughout the United States, Central America, and the Caribbean. Through her work, Walker created a legacy of pride and do-it-yourself spirit that still resonates today. Read about this remarkable woman and her legacy in Madam C.J. Walker: Entrepreneur. Excerpted from Madame C. J. Walker by Alelia Bundles All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.


Table of Contents

1 "Hit Often and Hit Hard"p. 1
2 Motherless Childp. 9
3 Sarah's Dreamp. 18
4 Gearing Upp. 33
5 "My Own Factory on My Own Ground"p. 42
6 "Don't Sit Down and Wait"p. 51
7 "We Should Protest"p. 63
8 "A Conference of Interest to the Race"p. 76
9 The Legacyp. 84
Chronologyp. 94
Further Readingp. 96
Indexp. 99
About the Authorp. 103
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