Cover image for The notes : Ronald Reagan's private collection of stories and wisdom
Title:
The notes : Ronald Reagan's private collection of stories and wisdom
ISBN:
9780062065131
Publication Information:
New York : Harper, 2011.
Physical Description:
xix, 299 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Added Author:
Summary:
From the bestselling editor of "The Reagan Diaries" come the newly disclosed notebooks of Ronald Reagan that bring to light his most intimate thoughts and favorite quotations.
Holds:

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Summary

Summary

Ronald Reagan left behind a legacy that America willnever forget. Now, in this one-of-a-kind collection of his most intimatethoughts, his favorite quotations by others, and his own most collectiblejokes, all culled from a newly disclosed set of personal notecards he keptthroughout his life and career, fans and admirers of the fortieth presidentwill find a unique window of insight into the soul of an American icon. Editedby Douglas Brinkley, editor of #1 NewYork Times bestseller The ReaganDiaries, this indispensible Reagan retrospective is perfect for fathers,graduates, and anyone looking to find inspiration in the thoughts and musingsof a great American leader.


Author Notes

Ronald Wilson Reagan, 1911 - 2004 Ronald Reagan was born in Tampico, Illinois on February 6, 1911. He worked his way through Eureka College, where he studied economics and sociology. After graduation, he became a radio sports announcer for WOC, a small radio station in Davenport, Iowa.

Reagan enlisted in the Army Reserve. An agent for Warner Brothers "discovered" him in Los Angeles in 1937 and offered him a seven-year contract. He played George Gipp in his most acclaimed film, "Knute Rockne -- All American" in 1940. In 1942, the Army Air Force called him to active duty and assigned him to the 1st Motion Picture Unit in Culver City, California, where he made over 400 training films. On December 9, 1945, he was discharged. During the next two decades he appeared in 53 films.

As president of the Screen Actors Guild, he became embroiled in disputes over the issue of Communism in the film industry and his political views shifted from liberal to conservative. He toured the country as a television host, becoming a spokesman for conservatism. In 1966, he was elected Governor of California and was re-elected in 1970. For several months after his gubernatorial term ended in 1974, he wrote a syndicated newspaper column and provided commentaries on radio stations across the country. On November 20, 1975, Reagan announced his candidacy for the Republican nomination for president. He lost the party's nomination, but his showing laid the groundwork for the 1980 election. After winning the party's nomination in 1980, he chose George Bush as his running mate. Reagan won the election and was President of the United States from 1981 to 1989. At the end of his administration, the Nation was enjoying its longest recorded period of peacetime prosperity without recession or depression. In 1994, he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. He died on June 5, 2004.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

In 2010, researchers at the Reagan Library discovered a box of index cards containing jokes, literary quotes, and excerpts from speeches written in Reagan's own hand and arranged under rubrics such as "On Liberty," "On War," and "On the People." Rice University history professor Brinkley, who also edited The Reagan Diaries, suggests Reagan began collecting these as spokesman for General Electric beginning in 1954 and continuing until his death in 2004. Readers uncertain if Reagan hated taxes ("Justice O. W. Holmes: "Keep govt. poor and remain free") and communism (Pravda: the communist program is "all embracing & all bloodsoaked reality"), or if he loved God, liberty, and the Constitution (Daniel Webster: "if the const. shall fail there will be anarchy throughout the world") will find answers here. Even the jokes show a conservative bent. The squibs are from sources as far-ranging as Dale Carnegie, Solzhenitsyn, G.K. Chesterton, and even Chairman Mao (on marriage). Admirers will find plenty to admire in these jottings and nothing to change their view of Reagan, but rather confirmation of the vision they already have. 9 b&w photos. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

Historian Brinkley edited The Reagan Diaries (2008) and now has at another handwritten artifact recently discovered in the late president's personal archive. It is a collection of note cards on which Reagan jotted quotations by political and philosophical figures in history and his own times plus a separate set of cards with jokes and one-liners on them. Apparently assembled in the course of Reagan's public-speaking career, first as a GE spokesperson, then as a politician, the texts on these cards, Brinkley says, appeared in one Reagan declamation or another. That fact affords insight through this volume into how the Great Communicator spiced up his speeches while also showing readers the note cards as distillations of Reagan's conservative political precepts. While most aphorisms Reagan copied resonated with his views on taxation, the welfare state, and free enterprise, he also wrote down, no doubt for use as foils in his talks, statements with which he would have disagreed by figures ranging from liberals to communists to fascists. Researchable by historians, pleasing to Reagan fans, The Notes certainly will circulate.--Taylor, Gilber. Copyright 2010 Booklist