Cover image for Growing vegetable soup
Title:
Growing vegetable soup
Author:
ISBN:
9780152325756

9780152325800
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication Information:
San Diego : Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, c1987.
Physical Description:
[32] p. : chiefly col. ill. ; 24 cm.
Summary:
A father and child grow vegetables and then make them into a soup.
Holds:

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On Order

Summary

Summary

"Dad says we are going to grow vegetable soup." So begins Lois Ehlert's bright, bold picture book about vegetable gardening for the very young. The necessary tools are pictured and labeled, as are the seeds (green bean, pea, corn, zucchini squash, and carrot). Then the real gardening happens . . . planting, weeding, harvesting, washing, chopping, and cooking! In the end? "It was the best soup ever." Ehlert's simple, colorful cut-paper-style illustrations are child-friendly, as isthe big black type. A recipe for vegetable soup tops it all off!


Author Notes

Lois Ehlert was born November 9, 1934, in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. She is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and the Layton School of Art. She has also worked as an art teacher, freelance illustrator, and designer. Her work as an author and an illustrator has appeared in countless publications and has received numerous awards and honors.

In addition to creating books, Ehlert has produced toys, games, clothes for children, posters, brochures, catalogs, and banners. She has received the Caldecott Honor Book, 1989, for Color Zoo, a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year for Snowballs, the Booklist Editors' Choice for Cuckoo/Cucú: A Mexican Folktale/Un Cuento Folklórico Mexicano, the IRA Teachers' Choice and NCTE Notable Children's Trade Book in the Language Arts for Feathers for Lunch, the American Library Association Notable Children's Book and Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor Award for Chicka Chicka Boom Boom.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1 This is the boldest, brassiest garden book to hit the market, and what a delight. Intensely colored graphics capture the complete growing process from seed to cooking pot, with the focus on the plants. The unseen narrator describes the process of growing vegetable soup, from preparing the tools and digging holes for the seeds to weeding plants; picking vegetables; washing, chopping, and cooking themand finally enjoying the homemade soup while planning to grow more next year. It's a fresh presentation of the gardening cycle with a joyful conclusion, and the added attraction of an easy and tasty recipe for vegetable soup on the flyleaf. A book to help nourish healthy readers. Barbara Peklo Serling, Oneida City Schools, N.Y. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Favorite titles are now available as board books for smallest hands. Upon the original publication, in 1987, of Lois Ehlert's electric-hued Growing Vegetable Soup, PW called it a "zesty introduction to vivid abstract art." With just one phrase per spread, the book makes a smooth transition to board book as it follows the long process of planting and growing ingredients for a truly homemade soup. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Kirkus Review

A very simple text about planting and growing a vegetable garden is accompanied by psychedelically bright illustrations. A red watering can held by a magenta hand on a green ground a hot-orange spade against blue--these colors are painfully vivid, jumping around on the page to the point of diverting attention from any pattern or information conveyed. Information is minimal anyway--seeds are planted and grow in an unrealistic medley, and the forms are so generalized that they would be recognizable only to someone already familiar with the various plants. The book concludes with a portrait of a vegetable soup that doesn't look like something to eat (although the jacket flap provides a simple recipe a kindergarten class could make). A plausible notion for a book, shouted down by garish illustrations. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Ages 2-8. Vivid rainbow colors and bold shapes distinguish a joyous, practical account of family gardening that culminates with ``the best soup ever.'' In its bowl the soup looks a bit like an imaginative painting of the planet Earth, subtly referring to natural cycles.