Cover image for Changes for Molly : a winter story
Title:
Changes for Molly : a winter story
ISBN:
9780937295960

9780937295496
Publication Information:
Middleton, WI : Pleasant Co. Publications, c2000.
Physical Description:
65 p. : col. ill. ; 23 cm.
Added Corporate Author:
Summary:
Molly's excitement at performing in a big show is exceeded only by the announcement that her father is returning home from the war. Molly is a lively, lovable schemer and dreamer growing up in 1944. Her stories describe her life on the home front during World War Two. Molly doesn't like many of the changes the war has brought, and she especially misses her father, who is away caring for wounded soldiers. But Molly learns the importance of getting along and pulling together -- just as her country has to do to win the war!
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Book J FICTION AME MOL 1 1
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Summary

Summary

Molly is a lively, lovable schemer and dreamer growing up in 1944. Her stories describe her life on the home front during World War Two. Molly doesn't like many of the changes the war has brought, and she especially misses her father, who is away caring for wounded soldiers. But Molly learns the importance of getting along and pulling together -- just as her country has to do to win the war!

Molly's plans for a special homecoming surprise for Dad are dashed when she gets sick. But luckily, the doctor comes just in time!


Summary

Molly can't wait for Dad to come home - he'll arrive in time to see her dance the part of Miss Victory in the big Red Cross show! Molly isn't worried about her tap dancing, but she wants to look sophisticated so that Dad will know how much she's grown up while he's been away at war. Unfortunately, Molly's hair is all wrong. When Jill finally finds a way to give Molly glorious curls, everything seems to be perfect. Then Molly gets sick. Things couldn't be worse - until the doctor comes just in time.


Author Notes

Valerie Tripp graduated with honors from the first coeducational class at Yale University in 1973. She received a Masters of Education from Harvard University in 1981. From 1974 to 1980, she was a writer for the Addison-Wesley Reading Program. She then became a freelance writer for The Hampton-Brown Company and ELHI Publishers Services creating educational materials for major publishers.

In 1983, Tripp and Pleasant Rowland decided to write a series of books about girls growing up all over the country during some of the most historical events of the past. Rowland envisioned the books as one of the cornerstones of a new company she had just founded called the Pleasant Co. Tripp's first assignment for Pleasant Co. was writing four of the six books about Samantha, a girl in turn-of-the-century America. Tripp then wrote about Felicity, Molly, and Josephina for the American Girls series. Her other works include the Hopscotch Hill School series.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6 Three more titles about three girls in different American eras, all dealing with some kind of change in their lives. Kirsten, a ten-year-old Swedish immigrant living with her family on the Minnesota frontier in 1854, must deal with her cabin burning down and moving to a new home. Samantha, a wealthy orphan living with her aunt and uncle in New York City in 1904, spends her five chapters helping her poor friend Nellie, who has been orphaned and sent first to a drunken uncle and then to a Dickensian orphanage replete with evil directress. Molly, a ten-year-old in 1944, is pinning all her hopes on being the tap-dancing Miss Victory in a big show at the veteran's hospital, but things don't work out quite the way she plans. The format of each title is the same. All open with a double-spread of portraits and descriptors introducing the main character's family and friends (although all of characters may not appear in all stories) and close with a ``Looking Back'' section which hits the social history highlights of the United States of that period. The stock types (``Samantha's poor friend,'' ``Kirsten's secret friend, an Indian girl,'' ``Molly's other best friend, a cheerful dreamer'') seem to preclude much peripheral character development, but also make it possible for each story to stand alone, without having read previous episodes. The brief stories tend to focus on events and action, which makes for a quick pace but some occasional lapses in explanation and follow-through. The six-page historical sections focus on changes in America, particularly for women, and are generally a good back-up to the stories' smoothly integrated period details. The selection of historical photos is excellent, although the texts are unavoidably superficial and stick to a middle-class lens in viewing American life. Their generalizations can also fail to provide a context for specific story events. The full-color illustrations, in occasional full-pages and frequent small edge-of-text drawings, capture the feel of the periods and give life to the characters (although the expressions in Kirsten's story are frequently awkward). While these aren't top drawer items (Kirsten, for example, is no Caddie Woodlawn, nor is her story of Sarah, Plain and Tall caliber), they're certainly lively and appealing enough to serve as introductions to historical fiction. Nancy Palmer, The Little School, Bellevue, Wash. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 3-5. Devoted readers of The American Girls Collection will welcome three new stories, each set in winter and centered around changes in the girls' lives. Kirsten (1854), a Swedish immigrant to Minnesota, endures a harsh winter. While her father is away logging, their cabin burns to the ground. Through fortuitous circumstances, the family is able to buy a better home. Samantha (1904), a wealthy New Yorker, has, since the remarriage of her grandmother, lived with her uncle and aunt. Her best friend, a poor girl, has been sent to an orphanage with her two sisters. In a happy-ever-after ending, Samantha's aunt and uncle adopt the the three sisters. Molly (1944) anticipates her father's return from the warfront, hoping to shine for him when she stars in her school's patriotic dance number. Sacrificing health to vanity, she puts her wet hair in curlers, contracts a fever, and welcomes him home from her sickbed. As is customary in this series, full-color illustrations brighten the pages, and a section at the back explains facets of American culture of the period. Each novel is short, each is flawed, yet a more engaging historical fiction series at this reading level has yet to be written. CP.