Cover image for Jedi Academy
Title:
Jedi Academy
ISBN:
9780545505178
Physical Description:
160 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
Summary:
My whole life I planned on going to pilot school like the rest of my friends--then I got rejected! Along came a little green guy named Yoda who invited me to Jedi Academy. Now I'm at a school with aliens, robots, and lightsaber-wielding bullies who can lift things with their minds! How am I supposed to compete with that? As if starting middle school wasn't hard enough. The story of Roan Novachez, Jedi Academy student, is told through comics, journal entries, letters, doodles, and newspaper clippings. This incredible, original story from author/illustrator Jeffrey Brown captures all of the humor, awkwardness, fun, and frustrations of middle school ... in a galaxy far, far away.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Material Type
Call Number
Item Available
Copies
Status
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC STA 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC STA 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC STA 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC STA 1 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC STA 0 3
Searching...
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC STA 0 1
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Author/illustrator Jeffrey Brown takes readers to a middle school in a galaxy far, far away.... Also, a NY Times Bestseller!This incredible, original story captures all of the humor, awkwardness, fun, and frustrations of middle school--all told through one boy's comics, journal entries, letters, doodles, and newspaper clippings. The setting? A galaxy far, far away... Roan's one dream is to leave home and attend Pilot Academy like his older brother, father, and grandfather. But just as Roan is mysteriously denied entrance to Pilot School, he is invited to attend Jedi Academy--a school that he didn't apply to and only recruits children when they are just a few years old. That is, until now... This inventive novel follows Roan's first year at Jedi Academy where, under the tutelage of Master Yoda, he learns that he possesses more strength and potential than he could have ever dreamed. Oh, and he learns other important things too--like how to make a baking soda volcano, fence with a lightsaber, slow dance with a girl, and lift boulders with the Force.


Author Notes

Jeffrey Brown was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan in 1975. While earning a MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, he abandoned painting and began drawing comics. His first autobiographical book, Clumsy, was published in 2001. His other works include Unlikely, AEIOU, Every Girl Is the End of the World for Me, Little Things, Funny Misshapen Body, Bighead, Darth Vader and Son, Vader's Little Princess, and the Star Wars: Jedi Academy series. He won an Ignatz Award for Outstanding Mini-Comic in 2003 for I Am Going To Be Small. In 2014 his title Return of the Padawan made The New York Times Best Seller List. He also directed an animated video for the band Death Cab For Cutie

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Horn Book Review

Roan's experiences as a new student at the Jedi Academy turn out to be much the same as those anyone might face when starting middle school, albeit learning to use the Force and building a light saber sound snazzier. Told via cartoon strips, journal entries, letters, emails, and more, this is a slight, conventional school story of finding friends and building self-confidence. (c) Copyright 2014. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

*Starred Review* A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, Roan Novachez thought he was destined to attend Pilot Academy Middle School, just as his older brother and father did. His dreams are crushed when he is rejected by Pilot Academy and accepted into a sketchy new school called Coruscant Jedi Academy. Roan has no idea what to expect at the academy and feels pressured after learning he is the oldest student ever to enroll there. Confused and struggling to keep up, Roan tries to fly under the radar and passes the time drawing comics of his daily life at his strange boarding school. This fantastic chapter book by Brown will satisfy those who loved his previous Star Wars works, Darth Vader and Son (2012) and Vader's Little Princess (2013). With its mix of comics and text, it will also appeal to fans of Jeff Kinney's Diary of a Wimpy Kid and Dav Pilkey's Captain Underpants hybrid books. On a deeper level, this book tackles serious issues like failure, bullying, friendship, determination, and starting a new school in a fun and funny way. Perhaps best of all, it encourages readers to practice creativity and to start their own journals.--Mack, Candice Copyright 2010 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-8-Roan Novachez has been personally invited by Yoda to attend Jedi Academy, but he's afraid that he'll flunk out and have to attend the Agriculture Academy on Tatooine next year. This Diary of a Wimpy Kid-like graphic novel follows Roan's adventures from the summer after elementary school through his first year at the academy as he makes friends (and enemies) and struggles to learn how to use the Force. Interspersed throughout the panels depicting events referred to in the diary are other items of interest, such as the boy's schedule and report card. The book's style matched with the popular subject will guarantee circulation in any collection. With the exception of Yoda, Brown has created an entirely new cast of characters set in the Star Wars universe around the events of The Phantom Menace. While it might be disappointing for those familiar with this world to see scant representation of beloved characters, it makes the book an easy starting point for new fans. There are plenty of references to other elements (the T-16 Skyhopper and Jedi training remotes, for example) for diehards to get excited about. Brown combines Star Wars excitement with real-life kid problems to make a fresh, inspiring, and humorous take on the franchise.-J. M. Poole, Webster Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Even the most critical Star Wars fans will give Lucasfilm points for licensing this subversive graphic novel. On the 2012 census, 176,632 people in England and Wales listed their religion as Jedi. At this point, Star Wars books may qualify as religious texts. Some of the comics and novels would be considered apocrypha, as they depart wildly from the plot of the films. Brown has cornered the market on Jedi Sunday school stories, as it were, with two previous picture books about little Luke and Leia and their dad, Darth Vader. This graphic novel stars Roan, a reluctant young Jedi-in-training. He'd rather be a fighter pilot like all his friends. This chronicle of his year at Jedi Academy takes familiar Star Wars tropes and runs with them and is at its best when it subverts the traditional doctrine. The scenes with Yoda are hilarious; Roan can't understand a word he says. YODA: "Ohhhh! Good to meet me, it is, hm? Heh Heh!" ROAN: "Um, what?" The plot rambles from time to time, and not every joke works, but even the Bible has its share of dubious puns. If this book is apocryphal, it's more fun than some of the actual movies and a lot funnier. One of the droids breaks down like an old VCR, right when it's supposed to deliver an urgent message. Sacrilege of the most satisfying kind. (Graphic fantasy. 8-12)]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.