Cover image for Old MacDonald had a farm
Title:
Old MacDonald had a farm
ISBN:
9780062198730
Edition:
First edition.
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm.
Series:
Reading Level:
AD 630 L Lexile
Summary:
"Pete the cat learns the sounds of the different farm animals in this twist on the classic song"--
Holds:

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Summary

Summary

New York Times bestselling author and artist James Dean brings us a groovy rendition of the classic favorite children's song "Old MacDonald Had a Farm," sung by cool cat Pete and perfect for sing-along time with young readers.

Pete the Cat: Old MacDonald Had a Farm is in a sturdy paper-over-board format and filled with vibrant, engaging illustrations for even the youngest of Pete fans.

"Old MacDonald had a farm e-i-e-i-o!"


Author Notes

James Dean was born in 1957, in Fort Payne, Indiana. He attended Auburn University and completed an engineering degree, before eventually following his dream to of being a full-time artist. He became an Illustrator, and his collaboration with Eric Litwin led to the success of their book Pete the Cat and His White Shoes. He is the illustrator of all the books in the Pete the Cat series. Several of James Dean's Pete the Cat titles including Pete the Cat: Valentine's Day Is Cool, Pete the Cat: Big Easter Adventure, Pete the Cat and the New Guy, and Pete the Cat: Five Little Pumpkins made The New York Times Best Seller List in 2015.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Pete the Cat is yet again inspiring sing-alongs, this time on Old MacDonald's farm. The book goes through the song with 17 different animals, each one keeping strictly to the familiar lyrics with no other textual additions. Each verse is accompanied by a spread illustration of that animal and Pete, either holding a guitar or driving a truck or tractor. The book has the repetition that readers have come to expect, but it is not original; it's simply an Old MacDonald picture book with illustrations featuring Pete the Cat. Those expecting the catchy original songs found in the first three "Pete the Cat" titles (HarperCollins) will be disappointed. However, for libraries that cannot keep enough Pete books on the shelves, this will do.-Emily E. Lazio, The Smithtown Special Library District, NY (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Horn Book Review

Pete the Cat and a turtle wander around Old MacDonald's farm noting the animals--chickens, dogs, horses, etc. (Oddly, the goat says baa and the sheep says maa.) The illustrations feel somewhat static, and there's not much here to hold the viewer's attention. However, Pete the Cat fans may enjoy seeing him down on the farm. (c) Copyright 2014. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

The heavy-lidded cat with a cult following dons overalls for a trip to the farm. There is absolutely nothing out of the ordinary about the text in this outing, verses unfurling spread by spread, one per animal. This feline Old MacDonald has some equally heavy-lidded chickens, dogs, cows, pigs, horses, (Siamese) cats, goats, ducks, turkeys, roosters, donkeys, sheep, frogs and geese, as well as a turtle that's pictured in each scene. They all pretty much say the expected things, though preschoolers will be quick to call shenanigans when they hear that Pete-the-Cat MacDonald's goats say "baa-baa" while the sheep say "maa-maa." The "action," such as it is, plays out on static, green-grassed, blue-skied backgrounds in which the occasional tractor or barn trades places with a red pickup. Aside from Pete and his turtle, the animals included in the spreads vary, sometimes accumulating and sometimes not; children who like to find patterns will be frustrated here. But the book's biggest liability is its star's practically comatose affect. Jacket copy and the character's mythos tell readers that Pete's "groovy," but he just looks like he couldn't care less. As the lyrics of "Old MacDonald" beg to be sung aloud with brio, Pete's never-changing expression and the unwavering stolidity of the compositions make a hopeless mismatch. "Old MacDonald" for narcoleptics. (Picture book. 3-5)]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.