Cover image for The act of killing
Title:
The act of killing
Edition:
Director's cut and theatrical cut, Widescreen.
Physical Description:
2 videodiscs (122 min., 166 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. + 1 booklet (40 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm)
General Note:
Special features: 45 min. interview with Oppenheimer on Democracy now!; Audio commentary with executive producer Werner Herzog and director Joshua Oppenheimer; Vice presents: Werner Herzog and Errol Morris on The act of killing; Deleted scenes; Trailers; 40 page booklet featuring an essay by Errol Morris; Digital download.
Contents:
disc 1. Theatrical version (122 min.) -- disc 2. Director's cut (166 min.)
Local Subject:
Summary:
The act of killing is an examination of the murder of political dissidents in Indonesia by government sponsored death squads in the years following the military coup in 1965, in which the filmmakers were successful in persuading those responsible to reenact the killings for the camera in the fashion of American movies.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Material Type
Call Number
Item Available
Copies
Status
Searching...
Nonfiction DVD DVD 959.8035 ACT 2 DISCS 1 1
Searching...
Searching...
Nonfiction DVD DVD 959.8035 ACT 2 DISCS 1 1
Searching...
Searching...
Nonfiction DVD DVD 959.8035 ACT 1 1
Searching...
Searching...
Nonfiction DVD DVD 959.8035 ACT 2 DISCS 1 1
Searching...
Searching...
Nonfiction DVD DVD 959.8035 ACT 2 DISCS 1 1
Searching...
Searching...
Nonfiction DVD DVD 959.8035 ACT 2 DISCS 1 1
Searching...
Searching...
Nonfiction DVD DVD 959.8035 ACT 2 DISCS 0 1
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Celebrated documentary filmmakers Errol Morris and Werner Herzog act as executive producers on Joshua Oppenheimer and Christine Cynn's deeply chilling documentary exploring mankind's frightening capacity for violence. Desperate to understand the rationale behind the mass killings of Communists in Indonesia during the 1960s, Oppenheimer and Cynn present former Indonesian death squad leader Anwar Congo with a unique opportunity -- reenact his savage crimes for the camera in the style of his favorite Hollywood films, and allow him the opportunity to speak candidly about his memories and motivations for committing mass murder. Later, as Congo recalls the various methods he and his followers used to intimidate and slaughter scores of Communists, the reality of his heinous transgressions begin to set in, and vivid nightmares fill his nights with unspeakable terror. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi