Cover image for Little green peas : a big book of colors
Title:
Little green peas : a big book of colors
ISBN:
9781442476608
Edition:
First edition.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Reading Level:
AD 360 L Lexile
Summary:
Little green peas make their way into collections of objects of many different colors, from blue boats, seas, and flags, to orange balloons, umbrellas, and fizzy drinks.
Holds:

Available:*

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On Order

Summary

Summary

The New York Times bestselling stars of LMNO Peas and 1-2-3 Peas are back for a romp through a rainbow of colors!

A passel of playful peas keeps it green as they experience the colorful world around them, from red kites to yellow buses to purple mountains and more! Bright and bold illustrations fill the pages of this delightful exploration of color.


Author Notes

Keith Baker has written and illustrated many acclaimed picture books for young children, including the New York Times bestselling LMNO Peas ; 1-2-3 Peas ; Little Green Peas ; Hap-pea All Year ; LMNO Pea-quel ; My Octopus Arms ; and No Two Alike . He lives in Seattle.


Reviews 5

Publisher's Weekly Review

Having previously played with letters and numbers in LMNO Peas and 123 Peas, Baker's tiny legumes show their true colors (green, namely) in this entertaining companion book. Bouncy rhymes introduce nine colors: "Blue boats, blue seas,/ blue flags, and.../ little green peas." Baker uses the page turns to create little crescendos of suspense, and the recurring answer changes just enough to keep things interesting. The color-themed spreads provide plenty of interest of their own, from a pair of autumnal "red" pages that show the peas flying kites and raking leaves to the cosmic black-and-white final spreads, which suggest that neither we (nor peas) are alone in this universe. Ages 4-8. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

Red fences, red trees, red kites, and... / little green peas." The peas are back (LMNO Peas; 1-2-3 Peas), and now kids will never eat them: they're too cute. In this concept book, the peas aren't illustrating the featured color but interacting with it (who did you expect to rake up those red leaves?). Baker is in fine form, injecting personality into each pencil-eraser-sized orb. (c) Copyright 2014. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

*Starred Review* This delightful, energetic concept book showcases nine colors and is a worthy companion to Baker's recent titles: LMNO Peas (2010) and 1 2 3 Peas (2012). Each color is designated two full-page spreads. Brightly hued, digitally rendered illustrations present the name of each color in large block letters, with every letter a varying texture and shade of the featured tint. The exuberance continues on the following pages, as the peas take part in the sports and entertainment specific to a particular season, which serves as a backdrop. The introductory color has a summertime theme: BLUE: Blue boats, blue seas, blue flags and little green peas, and the sweet peas are oh so busy. The pages offer plenty of white space and are fun to scrutinize, as there are peas piloting boats, riding on an ocean liner, sunbathing, scuba diving, looking for treasure, and building a sandcastle, among numerous other warm-weather activities. Simple rhymes scan well, and listeners will soon be enthusiastically joining in the refrain. This title also serves as seek-and-find entertainment since there is a ladybug and a paper airplane to be found on every page. Learning about colors has seldom been this much fun. Outstanding!--Owen, Maryann Copyright 2010 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Picture-book sequels can be tricky to do well, but Baker continues to beat the odds with this follow-up to LMNO Peas (2010) and 1-2-3 Peas (2012, both S. & S.). Groups of irrepressibly individual legumes frolic through a rainbow of colors-red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, silver, black, and white. Each color is given two spreads. The first shows the name of the color in large textured letters the size of buildings and surrounded by busy peas. "BLUE. Blue boats, blue seas, blue flags and.[page turn] little green peas." On the second spread, the name of the color is gone, replaced by a more detailed landscape showing the peas' escapades. Baker employs a good balance of predictability and surprise in the text; on the spread for green, instead of the familiar "little green peas" at the page turn, readers are treated to an utterly charming garden scene in which peas in colorful rubber boots collect "baby green peas!" from the vine. Careful readers will be rewarded by tiny details recurring throughout the book; a paper airplane thrown from the title page appears on every spread, a ladybug is hidden on every page, and the artist pea (Baker's self-portrait as a pea?) is shown on the cover with a colorful easel and is seen again painting each color throughout the story. Simple in concept but elegant in design and execution, this title is a delight.-Anna Haase Krueger, Ramsey County Library, MN (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

After tackling the alphabet and numbers in two previous excursions (LMNO Peas, 2013; 1-2-3 Peas, 2012), Baker's winsome legumes return for a third ap-pea-rance, exploring nine colors.Seven huesblue, red, yellow, orange, green, purple and silvergarner two double-page spreads each. The first spread establishes the color-redolent context; the second locates those inimitable peas within the color's established landscape. "B-L-U-E" towers in large, digitally rendered letters afloat on pale, stylized waves near a few sailboats. Sea stars cling to the "U," while three peas display semaphore flags. A page turn reveals an ocean liner cruising past a sandy isle, where some 40 peas sunbathe, paint pictures, lift weights, hunt for treasure and more. One charming spread glows green: A stringed trellis supports "Green vines, / green leaves, / green sprouts, and // baby green peas!" (Those babes in pods are adorable.) The "Silver" spreads contain large stacks of coins and a castle, complete with royal peas, distracted tower guards, a Rapunzel pea with long green locks, and even a gray, ghostly pea. The last color spread features both white and blackan appreciated twist in books about color concepts. While appealing, this doesn't quite measure up to Baker's earlier outings. The text is sparse and sometimes reads awkwardly. Too many of the spreads are under-pea-pulated, resulting in low exuberance levels.Sweetbut alas, not a three-pea-t. (Picture book. 3-7) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.