Cover image for 10 times 10
Title:
10 times 10
ISBN:
9781849762472
Edition:
English edition.
Physical Description:
1 volume of unnumbered pages : illustrations ; 19 cm
Subject Term:
Summary:
How many ways can you count to 10? With numbers, fingers, paints? How about with racing cars or with a fairy tale? In fact, you can do it almost any way you like! Herve Tullet, who has established an international reputation for creating dynamic books for young children, brings us this smart and silly counting book that will teach and entertain in equal measure. Counting has never been so much fun!
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Summary

Summary

How many ways can you count to 10? With numbers, fingers, paints? How about with racing cars or with a fairy tale? In fact, you can do it almost any way you like! Herv#65533; Tullet, who has established an international reputation for creating dynamic books for young children, brings us this smart and silly counting book that will teach and entertain in equal measure. Counting has never been so much fun!


Author Notes

Hervé Tullet was born in 1958. He studied Fine Art and worked as an Art Director before joining the advertising industry. In 1994 he published his first book for children and has since become one of the world¿s most innovative book makers. He is known in France as `The Prince of pre-school books' because he takes the concept of reading to a new level, teaching young minds to think imaginatively, independently and creatively.

Tullet's beautiful illustrations, interactive cut-outs, and magic lines make titles such as The Game of Light, The Game of Patterns, and The Game of Mix-Up Art, the perfect way to encourage seat-bound kids to think creatively and independently.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-This sophisticated concept book cleverly illustrates the numbers one through 10 using 10 different categories: "Numbers," "Fingers," "Paints," "Body," "Creation," "Construction," "Games," "Story," "Racing," and "Questions." The first chapter starts with zero while, oddly, none of the others do. In "Fingers," the digits of a human hand illustrate the numbers 11 to 15 and then morph into an undersea plant to show the numbers 16 to 20. Older children may find this amusing, but the transition is subtle and potentially confusing. "Paints" begins with one white line of paint accompanied by the text "One is white." The next page shows a white stripe and a red stripe and the text "Two is red." For "Five is orange," the four previous stripes (white, red, yellow, and blue) ingeniously appear, with the red and yellow ones intersecting to create orange. The four colors continue to intersect to create additional colors. Children may find the text puzzling. The wordless "Creation" chapter stretches over 10 pages and includes a naked Eve and Adam wearing fig leaves. Toward the end, there's a tally count of 100; 1,000 legs on a millipede; 10,000 spectators. The following page poses the question "What would you buy with one hundred thousand gold bars?" and shows six different luxurious objects. The book concludes with "one thousand million grains of sand" and "one thousand billion stars and more, to infinity.." Curiously, the last 13 pages are unnumbered. Counting books abound, and while this one certainly ranks high on the novelty and creativity scale, it may be too amorphous and esoteric to have wide audience appeal.-Rachel Kamin, North Suburban Synagogue Beth El, Highland Park, IL (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Tullet counts to 10 in 10 wildly eccentric ways, channeling the energy of a messy preschool art room. In one chapter, Tullet counts by fingers-but instead of using two hands, he just keeps adding fingers on one, with the resulting appendage resembling a sea anemone. Elsewhere, an accumulation of two ears, three noses, four eyes, five mouths, and more form a grotesque pink mutant creation with ruby-red lips and fangs. A riff on the Biblical story of creation and a fairy tale about two princes, three princesses, four witches, and so on are just a couple of the ways Tullet takes something as simple as counting to 10 and uses it as a springboard for loopy, creative experimentation. Ages 2-up. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

This deceptively sophisticated picture book offers creative options for counting from 0 to 100. Bright paintings with bold lines and splotchy brushstrokes whimsically portray increasing numbers of objects, beginning with integers and then progressing through themed sequences (fingers that morph into seaweed, primary colors that intersect to produce additional hues, a face that takes on Picasso-like features, and so on). Topics range from simple (race cars) to more involved (game participants) to abstract (the history of creation, including Adam and Eve, cartoonishly au naturel). Readers of all ages will enjoy counting along with the text, whether through literal tallying or figuring out more elusive representations. Preschoolers can practice number-recognition skills, and school-age children will appreciate the humor and wry take on traditional counting books. This engaging selection has multiple applications for the classroom and should find enthusiastic public library audiences, whether it's displayed in the children's section or elsewhere. Shelve this near universal pleasers such as David Carter's 600 Black Dots (2007) or classic Remy Charlip titles.--McBroom, Kathleen Copyright 2014 Booklist