Cover image for Coding games in Scratch : a step-by-step visual guide to building your own computer games
Title:
Coding games in Scratch : a step-by-step visual guide to building your own computer games
ISBN:
9781465439352
Edition:
First American edition.
Physical Description:
224 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
Subtitle from cover.

Includes index.
Contents:
Computer Games -- Getting Started -- Star Hunter -- Cheese Chase -- Circle Wars -- Jumpy Monkey -- Doom On The Broom -- Dog's Dinner -- Glacier Race -- Tropical Tunes -- What Next? -- Glossary & Index.
Reading Level:
940 L Lexile
Summary:
"If you like playing computer games, why not create your own? This book has all you need to build thrilling racing challenges, crazy platform games, and fiendish puzzles,"--page [4] of cover.

Coding computer programs is one of the most valuable skills for anyone to have. Written for children with little to no coding experience,Coding Games with Scratch guides children through building platform games, puzzles, racers, and 3-D action games. Schools have incorporated computer coding into their curriculum, beginning as early as kindergarten to ensure students understand the languages and uses of computer coding. The step-by-step guides are simple and easy to follow with Minecraft-style pixel art. Children will learn essential coding skills while having fun and creating games to play with their friends. The many different styles and types of games are covered, such as classic and arcade games. When people learn to code in Scratch, they learn important strategies for solving problems, designing projects, and communicating ideas. Coding Games with Scratch empowers children to be creative and to have fun while teaching them practical real-life skills.
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Written for children ages 8-12 with little to no coding experience, this straightforward visual guide uses fun graphics and easy-to-follow instructions to show young learners how to build their own computer projects using Scratch, a popular free programming language.

With Coding Games in Scratch , kids can build single and multiplayer platform games, create puzzles and memory games, race through mazes, add animation, and more. All they need is a desktop or laptop with Adobe 10.2 or later, and an internet connection to download Scratch 2.0. Coding can be done without download on https://scratch.mit.edu.

Essential coding concepts are explained using eight build-along game projects that guide young coders step-by-step, using visual samples, easy-to-follow instructions, and fun pixel art. The book teaches important strategies for solving problems, designing projects, and communicating ideas, all while creating games to play with their friends.

Supporting STEM education initiatives and the maker movement, computer coding teaches kids how to think creatively, work collaboratively, and reason systematically, and is quickly becoming a necessary and sought-after skill. DK's computer coding books are full of fun exercises with step-by-step guidance, making them the perfect introductory tools for building vital skills in computer programming.


Author Notes

Dr. Jon Woodcock has a degree in Physics from the University of Oxford and a PhD in Computational Astrophysics from the University of London. He started coding at the age of eight and has programmed all kinds of computers from single-chip microcontrollers to world-class supercomputers. His many projects include giant space simulations, research in high-tech companies, and intelligent robots made from junk. Jon has a passion for science and technology education, giving talks on space and running computer programming clubs in schools. He has worked on numerous science and technology books as a contributor and consultant, including DK's How Cool Stuff Works and Help Your Kids with Computer Coding .


Reviews 2

Kirkus Review

A comprehensive guide to creating games in Scratch, a beginner-oriented programming language that uses visual blocks instead of raw code. Woodcock begins by contextualizing computer games (explaining their elements, genres, and how computers think) and introducing Scratch (explaining its building blocks and how to acquire it and providing a rundown of what each part of the Scratch control window means). After this introduction, the book quickly has readers programming interactive games with animated characters, enemies, and scoring systems galore. Each of the eight games given (including mazes, jumping games, music patterns, races, and more) starts with a screenshot of the finished game that explains the roles of the characters and players' objectives. Clear text and screenshotsof both code blocks and game visualsthen walk readers through each increasingly complicated programming step. While sometimes pages are information-dense, the steps' numbering is easy to follow. Frequently, readers create their own images instead of using preprogrammed ones. What's especially nice about the instructions is that they aren't framed as "do this, then this"they fully explain why (right down to meanings of number variables) and provide fixes for anticipated bugs. Each game chapter ends with a "Hacks and tweaks" section suggesting further customizations, sometimes building off previous chapters' code. A "What Next?" chapter directs readers toward potential futures as programmers, be it hobbyist or professional. An absolutely wonderful introduction to programming games. (glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 7 up) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

With so much focus on kids and coding, it was high time for a detailed, interesting, comprehensible instruction guide targeted at middle-grade gamers in the making (and, hey, adults, too no shame). The first two chapters provide a basic introduction to gaming on the whole and the Scratch platform. After that, it's eight chapters of step-by-step coding of different types of games, including treasure hunts, mazes, jumping platforms, and races. Starting with a screenshot of the end result, each chapter is written with clear instructions and plenty of images that make coding just about foolproof, and at no point in time does the reader feel patronized. In fact, the instructions tell you not just the how-tos but also the whys, and every chapter ends with a Hacks and Tweaks section for more advanced work. Readers will walk away with a solid grasp of Scratch and the building blocks to bigger things. A great purchase for patron use, or even for curious library staff wanting to dip their toes into coding.--Linsenmeyer, Erin Copyright 2016 Booklist