Cover image for The hero two doors down : based on the true story of friendship between a boy and a baseball legend
Title:
The hero two doors down : based on the true story of friendship between a boy and a baseball legend
ISBN:
9780545804516
Edition:
1st ed.
Physical Description:
202 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Reading Level:
640 L Lexile
Summary:
Eight-year-old Steve Satlow is thrilled when Jackie Robinson moves into his Jewish neighborhood in Brooklyn in 1948, although many of his neighbors are not, and when Steve actually meets his hero he is even more excited--and worried that a misunderstanding over a Christmas tree could damage his new friendship.
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Based on the true story of a Brooklyn boy's friendship with his hero, Jackie Robinson.

The year is 1948, and the place is Brooklyn, NY. Stephen Satlow, a local Jewish boy, is an avid Brooklyn Dodgers' fan but a mediocre athlete, at best. When Jackie Robinson moves into his predominantly Jewish neighborhood and befriends Steve, his status changes instantly.

Their bond deepens when Jackie commits a wellintentioned blunder. He mistakenly gives Steve's family a Christmas tree. As the tension clears, acceptance of Jackie's gift of the tree becomes symbolic of two families from different religious and cultural backgrounds finding common ground. The friendship between the two families grows over the next few decades, when enormous social changes sweep the nation.


Author Notes

Sharon Robinson, daughter of baseball legend Jackie Robinson, is the author of several works of fiction and nonfiction. She has also written several widely praised nonfiction books about her father, including Jackie's Nine: Becoming Your Best Self and Promises to Keep: How Jackie Robinson Changed America.


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

Robinson takes a fictional approach to the subject of her famous father, Jackie Robinson. It unfolds in the voice of Steve Satlow, who was eight when the Robinsons moved onto his predominately Jewish street in Brooklyn in 1948 (Steve and his family also featured prominently in Robinson's 2010 picture book, Jackie's Gift). The story is relayed in flashback, triggered by 20-year-old Steve's discovery of a ticket stub from the '48 Brooklyn Dodgers' home opener in a box of "boyhood treasures" that his recently deceased father left him. Steve's impatience to meet his baseball idol and new neighbor (which finally takes place more than a third of the way in) grows repetitive, but the story's energy builds once Robinson is in the picture. Segues into political and humanitarian issues can get heavy-handed ("Prejudice," Steve's father explains, "is when you judge a person based on the color of their skin and not by their character"), but play-by-play baseball action will hold fans' attention, and Steve's struggle to curb his impulsiveness and fit in with his peers will register with many. Ages 8-12. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

Robinson has rich material to plumb in her story of the friendship between her African American father, Jackie, and the Jewish, hero-worshiping eight-year-old who lived two doors away in 1948 Brooklyn. Unfortunately, her writing about the moments of high emotion attendant to such a relationship is interspersed with awkward speeches about discrimination, prejudice, perseverance, and the like. A strong premise, hampered by earnestness. (c) Copyright 2016. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Inspired by a true story, Robinson tells the tale of a young boy who was able to befriend his hero (and the author's father), Jackie Robinson. Steve Satlow is a huge Dodgers fan, so he is thrilled when he hears the news that a player will be moving in two doors down. He hopes that it's his favorite player, Jackie Robinson, and that maybe he can catch a glimpse of him. Steve gets more than he expected when Jackie befriends Steve and his family. While told in a simplistic storytelling style, this charming tale offers up good fodder for discussion about prejudice, discrimination, friendship, and family. Steve's friendship with Jackie gives readers a glimpse into the personal side of this famous baseball hero. A nice choice for libraries looking to expand their sports collection. Be sure to have additional titles about Jackie Robinson on hand as readers are sure to want to learn more.--Thompson, Sarah Bean Copyright 2016 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-In 1948, when eight-year-old Steve learns that his African American baseball hero Jackie Robinson, who broke the color barrier in the sport the previous year, will be the new next-door neighbor in his all-Jewish Brooklyn neighborhood, he gains knowledge about respect, friendship, and unity. © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.