Cover image for Like a wolf
Title:
Like a wolf
ISBN:
9789888240449
Edition:
North American ed.

Michael Neugebauer ed.
Publication Information:
Hong Kong : Michael Neugebauer Publishing, 2014
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : illustrations (some color) ; 30 cm.
General Note:
Translation of: Tout d'un loup.
Added Author:
Summary:
"A dog, feared and mistreated by everyone, is rescued and cared for by a man who needs and appreciates him. Pointed ears, sharp teeth, and a back slightly bent under dark fur: a lonely dog gets mistaken for a wolf. No one came close--no one dared--so the sad dog howled. Until one day, someone reached out a hand to him"--Amazon.
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Summary

Summary

Winnner of: 2016 USBBY Outstanding International Books, Grades Pre K - 2 A dog, feared and mistreated by everyone, is rescued and cared for by a man who needs and appreciates him Pointed ears, sharp teeth, and a back slightly bent under dark fur: a lonely dog gets mistaken for a wolf. No one came close--no one dared--so the sad dog howled. Until one day, someone reached out a hand to him.


Author Notes

Géraldine Elschner has translated many books from German to French and French to German. She is the author of several children's books, including The Cat and the Bird, The Little Hippo, Mark's Messy Room, and Where Is the Frog? Antoine Guilloppé is the illustrator of many children's books, including One Scary Night and White Fang .


Reviews 5

Publisher's Weekly Review

Stark silhouettes make a dramatic impact in Elschner's grim account of an urban dog whose wolflike characteristics inspire mistreatment and fear. Terse, verselike passages bring readers inside the mind of the dog who is first seen chained to a post in a desolate yard: "A high fence all around, a roof made of metal,/ a rusty dish, and now and then,/ an old bone to chew./ This is where I lived./ No one came near me./ No one dared." A page turn reveals the wolf in profile against a white cityscape as it imagines itself bounding over fields. Accents of gray (for the dog's fur) and pale blue (for its eyes) hint at the beauty humans seem unable to see in the animal as it ends up in a kennel. Eventually, a man with a red scarf and a tall staff sees potential in the dog: " 'You look like a real shepherd dog!' he said./ It sounded like a promise." The story's darkest moments may upset readers with a soft spot for animals, but the closing scenes offer a sense of comfort, hope, and peace. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

A wolflike dog, chained up and neglected, narrates his own story in stark prose ("No one came near me. No one dared"), originally written in French. Stark, too, are the crisp silhouette illustrations, in mostly black-and-white with rare pops of color. After the story's sad start, dog lovers will rejoice as this "good dog" finds his place in the world. (c) Copyright 2016. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Every day people passed by, says the canine narrator of this picture book, each one looking for something cute, a good little doggie not a dog that looks like a wolf. The sad, fierce-looking dog has been in the pound for a long time, mistreated and passed over for softer, sweeter animals, and he is slowly losing hope. But one day, in comes a man who is looking for something a little different: a good dog he can put to work herding his sheep. This French import, a spare story about compassion and acceptance, is occasionally clunky in translation, though the narrative and the design compensate. The illustrations are striking silhouettes, primarily done in black-and-white with intermittent spots of color; the dog's kennel at the beginning is bleak and confining, while the later illustrations are much more open, featuring wide expanses of sky. A beautiful and ultimately heartwarming tale of seeing past the surface that will be especially appealing to animal-lovers.--Reagan, Maggie Copyright 2016 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-Narrated by a lonely dog, trapped in a shelter, this text will touch the hearts of animal lovers who believe there is a place for all creatures in this world. The dog is told that he looks wild, like a wolf, and there is no place for him. He is chained to a stake in a fenced-in shelter, spending his lonely days yearning for a "friendly hand on my fur" and spending his nights howling at the darkness. People pass him over until one day an imposing figure reaches through the bars to stroke his fur. "You look like a real shepherd dog," the man says and leads him away from his cage. Dramatic black-and-white silhouettes convey the darkness and loneliness of the dog and his cage until the shepherd arrives with a touch of color that leads to a bright ending. VERDICT Heartfelt and poignant, this simple text expresses what it truly means to be a "good dog." A sweet additional purchase for large picture book collections.-Carol Connor, Cincinnati Public Schools, OH © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

High-contrast, laser-cut images accompany a simple story about the destiny of a canine whose wolflike appearance and behavior lead it from imprisonment in a pound to a better life. "Pointed ears. Sharp teeth. A back slightly bent under dark fur. Wide eyes, always checking, always on alert. This is what I looked like. Just like a wolf!' people said." These opening words are set in white over black negative space on a double-page spread. The rest of the illustration uses to great advantage the starkness of black on white and white on black, with its depiction of a scruffy, fierce-looking animal behind a chain-link fence. It is no wonder why people associate this beast with a wolf. The animal builds sympathy as it describes its barren, caged existence and its longing to be free and to "feel a friendly hand on my fur." Some of the images are powerful, even disturbing, but the fact that the dog tells the tale in the past tense provides clues to readers that something better is coming. The artwork also changes accordingly, with a particularly furry, less-lupine image on a page where the dog sighs about all those people who pass it by, looking for "something cute"not something lupinefor a pet. The pages are arrestingly beautiful, with sparse, pointed text and frame-worthy illustrations. It's hard not to feel for this good dog. (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.