Cover image for Let's play!
Title:
Let's play!
Uniform Title:
Tu joues. English
ISBN:
9781452154770
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 23 x 23 cm
General Note:
Cover title.

"Simultaneously published in France by Bayard Éditions under the title Tu Joues?"
Reading Level:
AD 360 L Lexile
Summary:
A lively yellow dot leads the reader through a journey through color, shape, and a child's imagination.
Holds:

Available:*

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On Order

Summary

Summary

An interactive picture book from the creator of theNew York Times bestsellersPress Here andMix It Up!

Enjoy a ride of color, shape, motion, and imagination: It's only a yellow dot...but what a dot it is! Readers won't be able to resist this jaunty, adventurous dot, nor its invitation to play along. Filled with artistry and delight, on theLet's Play! journey, prepare to leap headlong into a completely new dimension: emotion. Connecting not only to the mind but also to the heart, this dot expresses an extraordinary sense of humor, fear, joy, and more as it pushes, lurches, wiggles, and slides its way through--and even off!--the pages of this glorious companion toPress Here,Say Zoop!, andMix It Up! The perfect book for young children to learn about following directions and basic emotion. Ideal as a fun and interactive read aloud book for families or small groups. Known as the "Prince of Preschool," the versatile Hervé Tullet has been an art director at various ad agencies, a magazine illustrator, and for the past 15 years, a creator of children's books. Fans ofMix It Up!,Press Here, andSay Zoop! will love this fun and inventive picture book,Let's Play!

Great for toddlers, preschoolers, and early readers to learn about emotion in a simple and engaging way. Kids will giggle and be amazed as the pages of the book seemingly come alive Screen-free imaginative fun for kids and adults. Makes a great gift! Books for kids ages 4-8 Children's picture book for preschool and kindergarten


Author Notes

Hervé Tullet was born in 1958. He studied Fine Art and worked as an Art Director before joining the advertising industry. In 1994 he published his first book for children and has since become one of the world¿s most innovative book makers. He is known in France as `The Prince of pre-school books' because he takes the concept of reading to a new level, teaching young minds to think imaginatively, independently and creatively.

Tullet's beautiful illustrations, interactive cut-outs, and magic lines make titles such as The Game of Light, The Game of Patterns, and The Game of Mix-Up Art, the perfect way to encourage seat-bound kids to think creatively and independently.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Fans of Tullet's Press Here (2011) and Mix It Up (2014, both Chronicle) will be entranced by his latest interactive offering. This time, readers are invited to follow a yellow blob through a variety of travails. Kids will be busy tracing their fingers along a curling black line, pressing the dot, and searching for it. Though simple-most of the pages are dominated by white space-Tullet's design is masterly, with the images and text artfully placed, and there's a beguiling charm to the childlike aesthetic. Spreads where the tone takes a slightly darker turn-a Jackson Pollock-esque one, for instance, dominated by smudges of black-add a bit of menace but never threaten to overwhelm. The text, rendered in Tullet's signature all-caps font, is enthusiastic and encouraging, perfect for this age group. The interactive elements make this selection ideal for reading alone or with an adult and are sure to invite plenty of repeat use. VERDICT Tullet proves once more that apps are no match for his savvy and kid-friendly vision. A delightfully whimsical addition, especially where the author's other titles are popular.-Mahnaz Dar, School Library Journal © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Tullet (Press Here; Mix It Up!) develops his innovative, interact-with-the-book project still further as readers travel through the book with a yellow dot. "So, will you take me along? It's easy: Just follow the line with your finger," says the dot. Readers trace Tullet's spidery, squiggly black scrawl across the pages: "Wow! That's really way up high... and really way down low!" the dot exclaims as the ink line arches, then dives. Tullet, always a fountain of new ideas, sends the line swirling and creates a carousel of dots to circle. There's a tunnel for the dot to go through and a page full of menacing splotches ("I really don't like this page," the dot says anxiously). Most of the interactions are hits-readers help the dot vault over a red blob, at which point it lands, the dot claims, in the reader's hair-with a couple misses mixed in (tucked deep within the book's gutter, the dot is nearly unfindable on a hide-and-seek page). Regardless, Franceschelli provides another fine translation, and Tullet's fans will rush to add this to their collection. Ages 3-5. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Kirkus Review

Another digital (in the original sense of the term) adventure from the reigning grand master of no-tech gaming. Following genial directions in a "hand-lettered" typeface called Herv Tullet Whimsy, readers can make a slightly-larger-than-thumb-sized yellow circle shift position by pressing different spots (and then turning the page). This is prelude to a fingertip odysseytraveled by "pushing" the dot along a continuous inked line that bounces, loops, climbs stairs, snakes through a thicket of streaks and dots for a bit of hide-and-seek, creeps into a dark passage and past obstacles, halts temporarily at a red light, then breaks into a series of increasingly exuberant spirals. The dot finally follows the line off the edge of the last page, leaving behind a tempting "Hey! Do you want to come back sometime and play some more?" The general idea has been carried through more elaborate, concrete iterations in a direct line that leads from Crockett Johnson's Harold and the Purple Crayon to Laura Ljundqvist's Follow the Line (2006) and sequels. Still, the spot offers an engaging ongoing commentary, which ranges from "Oooooh WOW ooooooo!" to "EEEEK! We better leave on tiptoe" and (for a spread of chaotic black scribbles) "I really don't like this page. You see why now, don't you?" It encourages a broad range of emotional reactions and responses from fellow travelers to go along with the physical interactivity. Playful indeed. Preschoolers will line up for a turn. (Picture book. 3-6) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

*Starred Review* The little yellow dot from Press Here (2011) and Mix It Up! (2014) returns, and this time it's in the mood to play. After a few introductory press here instructions, the real fun begins. Toddlers will be immediately engaged as the dot follows a black line, changes colors, plays hide-and-seek, travels through the dark, disappears, jumps onto the listener's head, pauses for a stoplight, runs, flips, and flies. Along the way, youngsters will experience various unstated emotions: exhilaration with the dot's movements, curiosity searching for the hidden yellow dot, bravery in the dark, disgust at ugliness, and silliness over the dot springing off the page. As with the earlier titles, this is interactive, inventive, and intuitive, but it does not repeat Tullet's previous tricks. An unseen narrator gently prods listeners (even adults will be hard pressed to resist responding) to follow simple commands, resulting in an experience that will convince some toddlers that the book in hand has become a touch screen device. As before, Tullet employs mostly primary colors set against white backgrounds, ensuring that the intended audience will focus on important details. The choice of heavy page stock and a sturdy binding also bodes well for repeated viewings. Ideal for one-on-one sharing, this could also work as part of an interactive story hour.--Weisman, Kay Copyright 2016 Booklist