Cover image for The bus ride that changed history : the story of Rosa Parks
Title:
The bus ride that changed history : the story of Rosa Parks
ISBN:
9780618449118
Publication Information:
Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 2005.
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 23 x 28 cm.
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Summary:
Details the positive consequences of one woman's act of defiance in the segregated South, including the Montgomery bus boycott, the repeal of Alabama's race laws, and the strengthening of the civil rights movement. In 1955, a young African American woman named Rosa Parks took a big step for civil rights when she refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white passenger. The bus driver told her to move. Jim Crow laws told her to move. But Rosa Parks stayed where she was, and a chain of events was set into motion that would eventually change the course of American history. Fifty years later, the Bus Ride that Changed History retraces that chain of events by introducing the civil rights movement one idea at a time. Take a ride through history with this unique retelling of what happened when one brave woman refuses to stand up so that a white passenger could sit down.
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Summary

Summary

In 1955, a young African-American woman named Rosa Parks took a big step for civil rights when she refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white passenger.The bus driver told her to move.Jim Crow laws told her to move.But Rosa Parks stayed where she was, and a chain of events was set into motion that would eventually change the course of American history.Fifty years later, The Bus Ride That Changed History retraces that chain of events by introducing the civil rights movement one idea at a time.Take a ride through history with this unique retelling of what happened when one brave woman refuses to stand up so that a white passenger could sit down.


Author Notes

Pamela Duncan Edwards was born in England. She became a school librarian when she moved to the United States with her husband and children. She eventually started writing children's books. Her works include Livingstone Mouse; Roar! A Noisy Counting Book; The Worrywarts; Clara Caterpillar; Wake-Up Kisses; Dear Tooth Fairy; McGillycuddy Could!; and The Neat Line.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-Published 50 years after Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, AL, this book retraces the segregation laws and the events surrounding the early stages of the Civil Rights movement. This historical account, illustrated with pen-and-ink and watercolor artwork, has a new twist as it is interspersed with modern-day cartoon characters guiding readers through the events and posing questions via dialogue-balloon conversations. Each new page builds from the previous one in the cumulative fashion similar to "This Is the House That Jack Built." If used as a read-aloud, listeners will want to join in on the refrain, "which was overturned because one woman was brave." This is an excellent tribute to Parks and to her role in history, told in a child-friendly style.-Tracy Bell, Eastway Elementary School, Durham, NC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

This glancing treatment of Rosa Parks's 1955 refusal to give up her bus seat to a white man unwinds as a cumulative narrative reminiscent of "The House That Jack Built." The style, jarringly at odds with this historical event, comes off almost as a parody. After introducing the bus, the passengers, the white man in need of a seat and the bus driver in recurring phrases, Edwards (Some Smug Slug) finally focuses on Parks: "This is Rosa Parks, who said, `No!' to/ the driver who told her to move for the white man/ left standing near the seats of black passengers riding/ the bus in Montgomery,/ where they enforced a law forbidding/ blacks to sit next to whites on buses,/ which was overturned because one woman was brave." The sing-song text goes on to highlight the resultant bus boycott, the Supreme Court's ruling and its impact on the growing civil rights movement. Four contemporary youngsters appear in the margins whose dialogue (presented in speech balloons) ranges from informative to inane (e.g., "Look! That woman is refusing to get up. That's so brave!"). Featuring muted hues, New Yorker cartoonist Shanahan's (Buckledown the Workhound) mostly static cartoon art is as lackluster as the narrative. Ages 5-9. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

An informative introduction and the dialogue balloons of four children provide background facts to the awkward cumulative main text. Pastel cartoon illustrations soften the harsh reality of the discriminatory Jim Crow law that prompted Rosa Parks's historic stand and the subsequent Montgomery Bus boycott. An author's note and an illustrated timeline conclude the book. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

K-Gr. 2. This is a law forbidding / black people to sit next to white people on buses, / which was overturned because one woman was brave. Each page adds a new first line to a cumulative chant about Rosa Parks (This is the boycott triggered by . . . ), and line-and-watercolor cartoon illustrations, which make use of speech balloons, depict kids asking questions and filling in the history of segregation and the struggle against it. Unfortunately, Edwards reinforces the image of Parks as the innocent passenger who worked alone to change the world, and she tells almost nothing about Parks' activist politics and the organizations she worked with. There's no denying, however, that kids will respond to the message (Sometimes it just takes one person to be brave ), and the lively pictures help make this an interactive introduction to civil rights history. Pair this with Nikki Giovanni's Rosa (2005), which does fill in Parks' political connections. --Hazel Rochman Copyright 2005 Booklist