Cover image for All that's left to tell
Title:
All that's left to tell
ISBN:
9781250085559
Edition:
First edition.
Physical Description:
290 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
"Every night, Marc Laurent, an American taken hostage in Pakistan, is bound and blindfolded. And every night, a woman he knows only as Josephine visits his cell. At first, her questions are mercenary: Is there anyone back home who will pay the ransom? But when Marc can offer no name, she asks him a question about his daughter that is even more terrifying than his captivity. And so begins a strange yet increasingly comforting ritual, in which Josephine and Marc tell each other stories. As these stories build upon one another, a father and daughter start to find their way toward understanding each other again" -- Provided by publisher.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Material Type
Call Number
Item Available
Copies
Status
Searching...
Book FICTION LOW 1 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book FICTION LOW 1 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book FICTION LOW 1 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book FICTION LOW 1 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book FICTION LOW 1 1
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

"Like Tim O'Brien's Going After Cacciato , All That's Left to Tell celebrates not just the power of storytelling but the deeply human need for it in even the most dire situations. Alternately gripping and dreamy, Daniel Lowe's debut imagines what the stories we tell reveal about ourselves, and how they may save us."
--Stewart O'Nan, author of West of Sunset

Every night, Marc Laurent, an American taken hostage in Pakistan, is bound and blindfolded. And every night, a woman he knows only as Josephine visits his cell. At first, her questions are mercenary: is there anyone back home who will pay the ransom? But when Marc can offer no name, she asks him a question about his daughter that is even more terrifying than his captivity. And so begins a strange yet increasingly comforting ritual, in which Josephine and Marc tell each other stories. As thesestories build upon one another, a father and daughter start to find their way toward understanding each other again.


Author Notes

Daniel Lowe teaches writing in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and received his MFA in fiction writing from the University of Pittsburgh. All That's Left to Tell is his debut.


Reviews 3

Publisher's Weekly Review

The spirit of Scheherazade animates this first novel about a midlevel Pepsi executive working in Pakistan, Marc Laurent, who is kidnapped by terrorists and held for ransom. Unfortunately, Marc was already personally estranged from everyone he knows back in the U.S. While his captors try to figure out what to do with him, blindfolded Marc is befriended by a woman who asks to be called Josephine and seems to have an upstate New York background. When she finds out that Marc has a 19-year-old daughter, Claire, who was murdered a month ago, and he didn't even go home to attend her funeral, Josephine begins spending their time together making up a narrative of what Claire's life might have been like if she hadn't died. In her story, Claire is 34 and lives with her husband, Jack, and their young daughter, Lucy, in California, where they operate a small motel. When she hears that her estranged father is in the hospital, Claire drives east to Michigan to see him. On the way, she picks up a hitchhiker named Genevieve, who spends their time together spinning out for Claire stories of Marc's life after he divorced her mother. Not since Kevin Brockmeier's The Truth About Celia has a novel made a more dramatic case for the importance of stories as a way to deal with life's tragic events. Despite one too many meta-games with the reader, the characters here remain real and memorable, a credit to Lowe's storytelling skill. (Feb.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Tell me a story may be the most hopeful request in the English language. In Lowe's luscious, if elegiac, debut novel, it produces an effect that is both alien and familiar. Kidnapped while on business in Pakistan, Marc Laurent is bound and blindfolded as he awaits daily visits from a woman known only as Josephine. She is not there to torture him, though torture him she does every time she commands him to tell her the story of his daughter, Claire, who was murdered at 19. Like a call-and-response religious ritual, Marc's stories then compel Josephine to create an alternative narrative of what Claire's life would have been like had she survived. Within that imagined story line runs yet another, of Claire's life as told by Genevieve, a hitchhiker who accompanies Claire on a cross-country trip to see Marc as he lies dying in a cabin in Michigan. This is a complex novel, without a doubt. And compelling. Lowe's elaborate tapestry showcases humankind's reliance on the power of stories to comfort, correct, and clarify both our hidden feelings and exposed fears. With its shifting points of view and emotional authenticity, Lowe's masterfully crafted first novel will be a surefire hit with book discussion groups.--Haggas, Carol Copyright 2017 Booklist


Library Journal Review

In this notable first novel, an American corporate executive is kidnapped by a shadowy Pakistani group. At a low point in his life, Marc Laurent has taken a position in Pakistan hoping to make a break with the difficulties of his recent past. These include a divorce from his wife, Lynne, and the murder of their daughter, Claire. Not long after his arrival, he is kidnapped while wandering near a sketchy neighborhood in Karachi. Held for ransom, he is visited by a member of the group, a woman who appears to be an American and calls herself -Josephine. She questions him about his daughter, and the two surprisingly begin a series of ongoing sessions in which they tell each other stories about Claire, inventing a life she might have lived. Through these conversations, Marc works his way to a better understanding about who his daughter was and toward a degree of healing and peace. VERDICT While the subject matter is taken from the news, this is a largely nonpolitical title. Lowe's concern is with the intricacies and intimacies of family life and the power of stories to sustain, even under the most extreme circumstances. A -remarkably accomplished debut.-Lawrence Rungren, Andover, MA © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.