Cover image for Dog Man : a tale of two kitties
Title:
Dog Man : a tale of two kitties
ISBN:
9780545935210
Edition:
1st ed.
Physical Description:
253 pages : chiefly color illustrations ; 22 cm.
Series:
General Note:
At head of title: Tree-House Comix proudly presents.
Reading Level:
GN 260 L Lexile
Summary:
Dog Man, the newest hero from the creator of Captain Underpants, hasn't always been a paws-itive addition to the police force. While he can muzzle miscreants, he tends to leave a slick of slobber in his wake! This time, Petey the cat's dragged in a tiny bit of trouble-- a double in the form of a super-cute kitten. Dog Man will have to work twice as hard to bust these furballs and remain top dog!
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Material Type
Call Number
Item Available
Copies
Status
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC PIL 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC PIL 0 7
Searching...
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC PIL 0 2
Searching...
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC PIL 0 4
Searching...
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC PIL 0 5
Searching...
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC PIL 0 16
Searching...
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC PIL 0 2
Searching...
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC PIL 1 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book J GRAPHIC PIL 0 1
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Dog Man, the newest hero from the creator of Captain Underpants, is still learning a few tricks of the trade. If only the Chief would throw him a bone every once and a while... Dog Man needs to dry up the drool, dust away the dander, and roll out of the refuse if he's going to impress the Chief, and he needs to do it fast! Petey the cat is out of the bag, and his criminal curiosity is taking the city by storm. Can the canine crime biter unleash justice on this ruffian in time to save the city, or will Petey get away with the purrfect crime?


Author Notes

Dav Pilkey was born on March 4th, 1966 in Cleveland, Ohio. His father was a steel salesman, and his mother was the organist at a local church.

In 1984, Pilkey attended Kent State University as an art major. One of Pilkey's freshman English professors complimented him on his creative writing skills, and encouraged him to write books, which launched him into his career. He found out about a contest for students who write and illustrate their own books, with the winners earning the prize of publication. Pilkey began creating his first book, "World War Won," and entered it in The National Written and Illustrated By...Awards Contest for Students. Pilkey won the contest and flew to Kansas City, Missouri to meet the editors and publishers at Landmark Editions, Inc.

Soon after the publication of World War Won, Dav moved back to Kent, Ohio where he had gone to college. In 1997, Pilkey won the Caldecott Honor for his book "The Paperboy" but is perhaps better known for his "Captain Underpants" series, which he had created while still in elementary school. His title Super Diaper Baby 2: The Invasion of the Potty Snatchers made Publisher's Weekly best seller list for 2011. His title's, The Adventures of Captain Underpants and Dog Man Unleashed, made The New York Times Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4-Fifth graders George and Harold, inspired by reading classic literature in school, have finished their third "Dog Man" graphic novel. A cop with the head of a canine and the body of a policeman, Dog Man fights crime while trying hard to be a good boy. As in the earlier installments, he defends his city from a daunting array of bad guys. Flippy the fish returns as an evil cyborg to ravage the city with an army of Beasty Buildings, and Petey the mad scientist cat clones himself and causes double trouble for our dogged hero. Though George and Harold are a bit older and "totally mature" now, their artwork remains charmingly childlike, with bold outlines and colorful simple backgrounds, and their dialogue retains its amusing misspellings and quirky syntax. Madcap action and general silliness abound on every page. The book is filled with laugh-out-loud situations, puns, delightful Flip-o-Rama animations, and a lot of licking and chewing on furniture-enough to keep even the most jaded young reader enthralled. VERDICT Pilkey has done it again. This latest installment is just as "supa" funny and irreverent as the first two volumes in the series. Sure to be popular, it's a great choice for elementary school graphic novel collections and of particular interest to reluctant readers and fans of the series.-Kelley Gile, Cheshire Public Library, CT © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Horn Book Review

Hoping to double his villainy, cat Petey (Dog Man's nemesis) clones himself but accidentally creates a sweet young clone; Li'l Petey wins everyone over, including his creator. Peppered with Dickensian allusions and "flip-o-ramas," this third series entry highlights the redemptive power of love and friendship. Pilkey's child-emulating cartoon style never condescends, and the graphic novel brims with cleverness, humor, and action. (c) Copyright 2018. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Humbug! Not only has feline supergenius Petey escaped from prison, but an evil psychokinetic fish is raising up an army of animate apartment buildings. What the dickens is Dog Man to do?Fictive co-authors George and Harold dish up another heap of "mirth and woe" for their dog-headed police officerfeaturing, to no Pilkey fan's surprise, slapdash plotting, sly jokes, alimentary humor, and Flip-O-Rama sequences aplenty. Actually, in a major twist, Petey the cat takes center stage thanks to Li'l Petey. This is a mini-me clone who refuses to be evil even when presented with a "supa-robot" 80-Hexotron Droidformigon wielding "80-HD Power" and who transforms Petey from supervillain to self-sacrificing parent, intoning "It is a far, far better thing I do" in the climactic clash. Said clash is inevitable after tiny but powerful Flippy sets out for revenge with a tank of "Living Spray Gas" that converts buildings to hungry monsters capable of eating (and, it turns out, ralphing up) anything in their path. But L'il Petey saves both day and the thoroughly diverse human cast by winning over the furious fish with a homemade picture book and, with his jailbird dad (temporarily) back behind bars, ends up Dog Man's cherished ward. Step-by-step instructions for drawing major characters and monsters, plus a tail-wagging plug for reading to canine audiences, cap a sequel that ably fulfills the 2015 opener's great expectations. Only chuzzlewits will be less than delighted. (Graphic science fiction. 7-10) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.