Cover image for Winter dance
Title:
Winter dance
ISBN:
9780544313347
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Reading Level:
AD 520 L Lexile
Added Author:
Summary:
A fox wonders how he should prepare for the coming winter, but what other animals advise will not work for him until another fox comes to his aid.
Holds:

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Summary

Summary

Snow is coming, and it's time to get ready! The squirrel gathers nuts, the geese soar south, and the snowshoe hare puts on its new white coat. But what should the fox do? Each animal advises the fox that its own plan is best, but the fox thinks otherwise--yet it's not until he meets a golden-eyed friend that he finds the perfect way to celebrate the snowfall.

Stunning illustrations by the new talent Richard Jones are the perfect complement to the Newbery Honor winner Marion Dane Bauer's lyrical and playful homage to the natural world.


Author Notes

Marion Dane Bauer was born in Oglesby, Illinois. She attended community college first, in her home town, and then went to the University of Missouri when she was a junior to study journalism. She quickly realized that journalism was not for her and changed her focus to the humanities and a degree in English literature. She switched one last time to focus on teaching english, which she did when she graduated college.

After her children were born, Bauer decided to try her hand at writing. She started out with a children's picture book, but discovered that youg adult novels were more to her taste. After making a career out of writing, Bauer became the first Faculty Chair at Vermont College for the only Master of Fine Arts in Writing program devoted exclusively to writing for children and young adults.

Bauer is the author of more than forty books for young people. She has won many awards, including a Jane Addams Peace Association Award for her novel Rain of Fire and an American Library Association Newbery Honor Award for On My Honor and the Kerlan Award from the University of Minnesota for the body of her work. Her picture book My Mother is Mine was a New York Times bestseller.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 5

Publisher's Weekly Review

With winter fast approaching, geese know to fly away and bears know to hibernate, but a red fox is at a loss. One by one, animals offer the fox advice, and one by one the fox rejects their suggestions. "Gather, gather, gather./ Then quick,/ quick,/ hide everything away," says a squirrel. "That won't do for me," the fox muses. "I don't even like acorns." Eventually, another red fox shows up with an idea that works: "When a million snowflakes/ fill the air,/ twirling,/ tumbling,/ spinning,/ waltzing,/ you and I/ join them." Bauer's verselike text pairs gracefully with smudgy and similarly understated scenes from British illustrator Jones: the text and artwork work in tandem to suggest the hushed onset of winter while carrying readers forward with the swiftness of a snow flurry. Ages 4-7. Author's agent: Rubin Pfeffer, Rubin Pfeffer Content. Illustrator's agent: Arabella Stein, Bright Group. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

As winter approaches, a fox wonders what to do. Advice from other animals gives young listeners an overview of creatures in a woodland habitat as, for example, a squirrel scurries to gather nuts, a turtle buries itself in mud, and a snowshoe hare camouflages itself with a white coat. Illustrations reflect a gentle narrative and uncluttered setting as the fox learns its surprising seasonal role. (c) Copyright 2018. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

*Starred Review* When a snowflake lands on the head of a red fox, he knows it's time to prepare for winter. But what he doesn't know is how he should go about doing that. So he sets off through the woods, asking a variety of creatures for advice none of which is particularly suitable for a fox. A furry caterpillar recommends he make himself a chrysalis. A turtle suggests that he swim to the bottom of a pond and bury himself in mud. In every case, the exchange ends with the animal doing just that, sending the fox onward in his quest. As he talks with geese, a bear, a squirrel, bats, and a snowshoe hare, young readers get a glimpse of how the forest as a whole prepares for the winter season. The regular pattern of Bauer's text provides excellent support for prereaders, while remaining sweetly simple. However, it's Jones' soft-lined, textured illustrations that steal the show, as they cast beautiful forest scenes across the page, using a cool wintry palette against which the fox's orangey-red fur pops. Eventually, the fox finds another of his kind, who has the answer to his question, providing a lovely finish to this finely crafted winter's tale.--Smith, Julia Copyright 2017 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Winter approaches with the arrival of a solitary snowflake, while a young red fox questions what to do when the air grows colder and the ground slowly covers with snow. A softly painted palette that gently mimics a snowy landscape presents the change in seasons and the still quiet of nature through varied perspectives as, one by one, the fox asks the creatures of the forest, "What should I do?" Each answers with the instinct or innate behavior of their species-helpful advice comes from a caterpillar, turtle, bat, squirrel, goose, and snowshoe hare. Lastly, a "great black bear," advises "Curl beneath the roots of a toppled balsam tree, and tuck all your growls away." No advice seems quite right until another fox invites him to watch as "a million snowflakes fill the air" and join in a celebratory dance. Inspired by the author's discovery of the foxes' dance in the woods of the North, the descriptive, lyrical text and its placement imitate the dance's movement. VERDICT A suggested first purchase suitable for young readers in libraries and classrooms studying seasons and animal behavior.-Mary Elam, Learning Media Services, Plano ISD, TX © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

As winter begins to set in, a curious fox wonders what he ought to do. Winter is cominga snowflake has just fallen on the nose of the "fine red fox"and he wonders what he should do. With each page turn, he encounters a critter that gives him advice. A caterpillar tells him to wrap himself in a chrysalis and become a butterfly in the spring, but the fox replies that he was "not meant to fly." The bat tells him to find a cave, hang by his toes, and go to sleep, but the fox says his "toes would get tired." The squirrel tells him to "gather, gather, gather," but the fox replies, "I don't even like acorns." In this cheerful way, readers follow the fox through his rambles while learning what different creatures do during the winter. Bauer's free-verse narrative is sprightly and accomplished, with a playful touch and earnest humor. Jones' full-page illustrations, done in rich, muted earth tones, are stunningly designed and executedthe hare is particularly effectivewhile the book's illustrated endpapers amplify the story with satisfying detail. What the fox ultimately finds to do may surprise readers, but it is, like the rest of the book, based in fact. An exemplary addition to the shelves of nature-themed picture books. (Picture book. 3-6) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.