Cover image for Mirandy and Brother Wind
Title:
Mirandy and Brother Wind
ISBN:
9780679883333
Edition:
1st Dragonfly Books ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Dragonfly Books/Alfred A. Knopf : Distributed by Random House, c1996.
Physical Description:
[32] p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
General Note:
"Originally published in hardcover as a Borzoi Book by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., in 1988"--Verso t.p.

Includes recipe for a cake.
Reading Level:
690 L Lexile
Added Author:
Summary:
Who will be Mirandy's partner for the junior cakewalk?
Holds:

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Summary

Summary

"Each page sparkles with life."-- The New York Times Book Review

In this Caldecott Honor and Coretta Scott King Award winning tale, Mirandy is determined to capture the best partner for the junior cakewalk jubilee. And who is the best partner? The wind, of course!

Grandmama Beasley says, "Can't nobody put shackles on Brother Wind, chile. He be special. He be free." With neighbors up and down Ridgetop suggesting all manner of strategies, and friend Ezel laughing at each foiled one, Mirandy grows ever more determined: she'll get hold of that Brother Wind yet!
Patricia C. McKissack's thoroughly engaging tale dances with spirit and rollicking good humor. Complemented by Jerry Pinkney's rich, eye-catching watercolors of the rural South, here's one of those rare, rewarding picture books that is sure to be read and enjoyed again and again.


Author Notes

Patricia C. McKissack was born in Smyrna, Tennessee on August 9, 1944. She received a bachelor's degree in English from Tennessee State University in 1964 and a master's degree in early childhood literature and media programming from Webster University in 1975. After college, she worked as a junior high school English teacher and a children's book editor at Concordia Publishing.

Since the 1980's, she and her husband Frederick L. McKissack have written over 100 books together. Most of their titles are biographies with a strong focus on African-American themes for young readers. Their early 1990s biography series, Great African Americans included volumes on Frederick Douglass, Marian Anderson, and Paul Robeson. Their other works included Black Hands, White Sails: The Story of African-American Whalers and Days of Jubilee: The End of Slavery in the United States. Over their 30 years of writing together, the couple won many awards including the C.S. Lewis Silver Medal, a Newbery Honor, nine Coretta Scott King Author and Honor awards, the Jane Addams Peace Award, and the NAACP Image Award for Sojourner Truth: Ain't I a Woman?. In 1998, they received the Coretta Scott King-Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement.

She also writes fiction on her own. Her book included Flossie and the Fox, Stitchin' and Pullin': A Gee's Bend Quilt, A Friendship for Today, and Let's Clap, Jump, Sing and Shout; Dance, Spin and Turn It Out! She won the Newberry Honor Book Award and the King Author Award for The Dark Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural in 1993 and the Caldecott Medal for Mirandy and Brother Wind. She dead of cardio-respiratory arrest on April 7, 2017 at the age of 72.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3 Sultry watercolor washes in a realistic flowing style spread luxuriously and consistently over every two pages in this story set in the rural south. Young Mirandy wants to win her town's cakewalk jubilee, a festive dance contest. (According to the ``Author's Note,'' this dance was ``first introduced in America by slaves. . .and is rooted in Afro-American culture.'') Everyone says that if she captures the Wind he will do her bidding, but nobody seems to know how to capture him. In the end, Mirandy does believe that she has captured Brother Wind, but she also proves that she is a true friend to clumsy Ezel. McKissack's sincere belief in the joy of living is delightfully translated into this story which concludes, ``When Grandmama Beasley had seen Mirandy and Ezel turning and spinning, moving like shadows in the flickering candlelight, she'd thrown back her head, laughed, and said, `Them chullin' is dancing with the Wind!' '' A captivating story, with a winning heroine, told in black dialect. Gratia Banta, Germantown Public Library, Ohio (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

As a prefatory note explains, this picture book was inspired by a photo of the author's grandparents winning a cakewalk``a dance rooted in Afro-American culture''and her grandfather's boast that, in her dancing, his wife had captured the wind. In the book, Mirandy determines to catch Brother Wind and have him for her partner in the upcoming junior cakewalk. She tries a number of tactics springing from folk wisdom, and finally succeeds in trapping her prey in the barn. At the contest, Mirandy chooses to dance with her friend Ezelbut, with Brother Wind to do her bidding, the two friends win the cakewalk in style. Told in spirited dialect and rendered in lavish, sweeping watercolors, this provides an intriguing look at a time gone by. As a story, however, it proves somewhat disappointing. After the colorful description of cakewalking in the author's note and the anticipation created through Mirandy's own eagerness, the brief and rather static scenes portraying the dance itself are a letdown. Ages 4-8. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Gr. 2-4. Mirandy is convinced that if she captures Brother Wind as her partner, she will win the junior cakewalk. When her friend Ezell is taunted for being clumsy, Mirandy's plans take a new direction.