Cover image for Quiet girl in a noisy world : an introvert's story
Title:
Quiet girl in a noisy world : an introvert's story
ISBN:
9781449486068
Physical Description:
174 pages, 3 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 21 cm.
Summary:
This illustrated gift book of short comics illuminates author Debbie Tung's experience as an introvert in an extrovert's world. Presented in a loose narrative style that can be read front to back or dipped into at one's leisure, the book spans three years of Debbie's life, from the end of college to the present day. In these early years of adulthood, Debbie slowly but finally discovers there is a name for her lifelong need to be alone: she's an introvert.The first half of the book traces Debbie's final year in college: socializing with peers, dating, falling in love (with an extrovert!), moving in, getting married, meeting new people, and simply trying to fit in. The second half looks at her life after graduation: finding a job, learning to live with her new husband, trying to understand social obligations when it comes to the in-laws, and navigating office life. Ultimately, Quiet Girl sends a positive, pro-introvert message: our heroine learns to embrace her introversion and finds ways to thrive in the world while fulfilling her need for quiet.
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Book GRAPHIC 921 TUNG 1 2
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Summary

Summary

Sweet, funny, and quietly poignant, Debbie Tung's comics reveal the ups and downs of coming of age as an introvert. Presented in a loose narrative style that can be read front to back or dipped into at leisure, the book spans three years of Debbie's life, from the end of college to the present day. In these early years of adulthood, Debbie slowly but finally discovers there is a name for her lifelong need to be alone: she's an introvert. Ultimately, Quiet Girl sends a positive, pro-introvert message: our heroine learns to embrace her introversion and finds ways to thrive in the world while fulfilling her need for quiet.


Author Notes

Deborah "Debbie" Tung is a cartoonist and illustrator from Birmingham, England. Her comics are based on simple everyday life moments and her love for books and tea.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Growing up, Tung felt shy and socially awkward and alienated because of it. Her coming-of-age graphic memoir shares her evolving understanding of her introvertedness as well as the methods she, now a well-adjusted and still-introverted adult, has developed to cope in a world that seems to more readily reward socially gracious extroverts. In this format, watery black-ink comics fairly typically divided into frames and occasional whole-page illustrations, Tung tells her story relatably and with an easy good humor. When an uncomfortable date ends earlier than anticipated, for instance, Tung trades halting speech for visible wisps of relief. Her cartoons introduce with clarity the concept of her social battery: what depletes it, how to recharge it, how much harder everything is when it's nearing empty. Though there is plenty for introverts and people with social anxiety to identify with here, this is above all Tung's personal story. This is a perfect way to learn more about personality traits that, by their very nature, can be difficult to publicly articulate.--Bostrom, Annie Copyright 2018 Booklist


Library Journal Review

[DEBUT] Introversion is in vogue these days. And why not? The vast yet anonymous expanse of the Internet is the perfect place for folks to be themselves while remaining guarded by digital distance-and loud-spoken introversion paradoxically flourishes. Tung's comics are a great example of this phenomenon of the introvert in the spotlight. In this loosely knit memoir about realizing that one must work with one's shy character rather than against it, episodes range from growing up quiet to finding a respectful romantic relationship to the crush of a mundane office job. Tung's experiences are instantly recognizable for anyone who has ever chosen bed and a book over happy hour, but they also feel tidy and safe to the point of oversimplification. The precise, cute but not cloying panel comics are satisfying as small, emotionally vivid stand-alones, but the arc of the artist's young life begs a bit more self-revelation. Verdict Well drawn and gently told, Tung's tale is pleasant but does little to distinguish itself from the pack.-Emilia Packard, Austin, TX © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.