Cover image for Standing up against hate : how Black women in the Army helped change the course of WWII
Title:
Standing up against hate : how Black women in the Army helped change the course of WWII
ISBN:
9781419731600
Physical Description:
xi, 196 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
"Standing Up Against Hate tells the stories of the African American women who enlisted in the newly formed Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) in World War II. They quickly discovered that they faced as many obstacles in the armed forces as they did in everyday life. However, they refused to back down. They interrupted careers and left family, friends, and loved ones to venture into unknown and sometimes dangerous territory. They survived racial prejudice and discrimination with dignity, succeeded in jobs women had never worked before, and made crucial contributions to the military war effort. The book centers around Charity Adams, who commanded the only black WAAC battalion sent overseas and became the highest ranking African American woman in the military by the end of the war. Along with Adams's story are those of other black women who played a crucial role in integrating the armed forces. Their tales are both inspiring and heart-wrenching. The book includes a timeline, bibliography, and index"--
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Summary

Summary

Standing Up Against Hate tells the stories of the African American women who enlisted in the newly formed Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) in World War II. They quickly discovered that they faced as many obstacles in the armed forces as they did in everyday life. However, they refused to back down. They interrupted careers and left family, friends, and loved ones to venture into unknown and sometimes dangerous territory. They survived racial prejudice and discrimination with dignity, succeeded in jobs women had never worked before, and made crucial contributions to the military war effort. The book centers around Charity Adams, who commanded the only black WAAC battalion sent overseas and became the highest ranking African American woman in the military by the end of the war. Along with Adams's story are those of other black women who played a crucial role in integrating the armed forces. Their tales are both inspiring and heart-wrenching. The book includes a timeline, bibliography, and index.


Author Notes

Mary C. Farrell is an award-winning journalist and the author of Fannie Never Flinched and Pure Grit. She lives in Spokane, Washington.Major General Marcia M. Anderson'smilitary career spanned 36 years, and included many "firsts" including selection as the first African American female Major General in the Army, Army Reserve, or Active Army.


Reviews 2

Kirkus Review

African-American women fought for freedom at home and abroad as they served their country during World War II.When the United States Army found itself in need of personnel who could do work that would free men to report to combat, it established first the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps and then the Women's Army Corps. Black leaders were already encouraging more wartime opportunities for African-Americans and sought to use this innovation to help end segregation. Civil rights activist Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune pushed for integration of the corps, but the country's official "separate but equal" policy stood, although a quota of black women received officer's training. The women who responded to the call were well familiar with the racial mores of the times, but the insults they endured hurt. Nevertheless, they worked and trained hard and put forth every effort to succeed, sometimes risking court martial for standing up for themselves. When they were called for overseas duty, the 6888th Central Postal Battalion performed their duties so well in Birmingham, England, that they went on to another assignment in France. Importantly, Farrell brings in the voices of the women, which provides clarity and understanding of what they experienced. She also highlights the role of black newspapers in keeping the community informed about the difficulties they often faced. The text is richly supported with archival photographs. The importance of this story is amplified by the inspiring forward by Maj. Gen. Marcia M. Anderson, Army (Ret.), who makes a direct link between the determined struggles of those described and the achievements of African-American women in today's U.S. military.The stories in this valuable volume are well worth knowing. (author's note, glossary, timeline, source notes, bibliography; index and forward not seen) (Nonfiction. 10-14) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Throughout history, women have often faced limited futures. Before WWII, most women were encouraged to get married and have children. Often, educated women were allowed careers only as teachers; for black women, teaching in underfunded segregated schools was a bleak, monotonous future. With war came opportunity: though they would not make rank or receive equal pay, women were encouraged to join the military, and they began bringing about a change in perception as to what women were capable of achieving. The Women's Army Auxiliary Corps was begun to help usher in this new change, though, unfortunately, it brought about more problems segregation and racism ran rampant among the officers and enlisted. Still, black women enlisted by the droves, leaving their children with relatives in order to build them a better future. Extensive back matter, which includes a time line and notes on the primary sources used, will help guide readers as they explore how black women took advantage of these opportunities to help drive integration forward. An adventurous ride through the history of black women pioneers.--Jessica Anne Bratt Copyright 2018 Booklist


Table of Contents

Forewordp. ix
Chapter 1 Reporting for War Dutyp. 1
Chapter 2 Second-Class Citizensp. 9
Chapter 3 Becoming Officers Togetherp. 23
Chapter 4 Black Women Persistp. 37
Chapter 5 Every Victory Countsp. 51
Chapter 6 Black Soldiers Get the Dirty Workp. 67
Chapter 7 Black WACs Strike for Fair jobsp. 75
Chapter 8 Violence Targets Black WACsp. 83
Chapter 9 Called for Overseas Dutyp. 95
Chapter 10 The 6888th Goes to Europep. 105
Chapter 11 Welcomed as Equalsp. 117
Chapter 12 A Challenge to Leadershipp. 131
Chapter 13 Mission Accomplishedp. 135
Chapter 14 Black WACs Carry Onp. 149
Author's Notep. 163
Glossaryp. 167
Time linep. 171
Notesp. 173
Select Bibliographyp. 185
Image Creditsp. 189
Acknowledgmentsp. 191
Indexp. 193