Cover image for Black enough : stories of being young & black in America
Title:
Black enough : stories of being young & black in America
ISBN:
9780062698728
Edition:
1st ed.
Physical Description:
xiv, 400 pages ; 22 cm.
Contents:
Half a moon / Renée Watson -- Black enough / Varian Johnson -- Warning, color may fade / Leah Henderson -- Black. Nerd. Problems / Lamar Giles -- Out of the silence / Kekla Magoon -- The ingredients / Jason Reynolds -- Oreo / Brandy Colbert -- Samson and the Delilahs / Tochi Onyebuchi -- Stop playing / Liara Tamani -- Wild horses, wild hearts / Jay Coles -- Whoa! / Rita Williams-Garcia -- Gravity / Tracey Baptiste -- The trouble with drowning / Dhonielle Clayton -- Kissing Sarah Smart / Justina Ireland -- Hackathon Summers / Coe Booth -- Into the starlight / Nic Stone -- The (r)evolution of Nigeria Jones / Ibi Zoboi.
Summary:
A collection of short stories explore what it is like to be young and black, centering on the experiences of black teenagers and emphasizing that one person's experiences, reality, and personal identity are different than someone else.
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Edited by National Book Award finalist Ibi Zoboi, and featuring some of the most acclaimed bestselling Black authors writing for teens today--Black Enough is an essential collection of captivating stories about what it's like to be young and Black in America.

Black is...sisters navigating their relationship at summer camp in Portland, Oregon, as written by Renée Watson.

Black is...three friends walking back from the community pool talking about nothing and everything, in a story by Jason Reynolds.

Black is...Nic Stone's high-class beauty dating a boy her momma would never approve of.

Black is...two girls kissing in Justina Ireland's story set in Maryland.

Black is urban and rural, wealthy and poor, mixed race, immigrants, and more--because there are countless ways to be Black enough.

Contributors:

Justina Ireland

Varian Johnson

Rita Williams-Garcia

Dhonielle Clayton

Kekla Magoon

Leah Henderson

Tochi Onyebuchi

Jason Reynolds

Nic Stone

Liara Tamani

Renée Watson

Tracey Baptiste

Coe Booth

Brandy Colbert

Jay Coles

Ibi Zoboi

Lamar Giles


Author Notes

Kekla Magoon is a writer, editor, speaker, and educator. She is the author of Camo Girl, 37 Things I Love (in No Particular Order), How It Went Down, and numerous non-fiction titles for the education market. Her book, The Rock and the River, won the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award. She also leads writing workshops for youth and adults and is the co-editor of YA and Children's Literature for Hunger Mountain, the arts journal of Vermont College.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 5

Publisher's Weekly Review

This collection of 17 original stories is written by contemporary black authors who explore "teens examining, rebelling against, embracing, or simply existing within their own idea of blackness." The tales offer a wide array of perspectives and thoughtful reflections on black teenagers' experiences, with pervading themes that include black identity (Varian Johnson's "Black Enough"), sexual awakening (Justina Ireland's "Kissing Sarah Smart"), and teenage worries. The stories, all worth savoring, share a celebratory outlook on black teenagers fully and courageously embracing life. Ages 13-up. (Jan.) c Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

What does it mean to be black? What does black look like? Sound like? Feel like? Zobois anthology explores these questions and more in seventeen short stories by an impressive collection of well-known black childrens and young adult authors. The Ingredients by Jason Reynolds offers a glimpse of hungry teenagers fantasizing about sandwiches on a hot summer day. The Afrofuturistic Whoa! by Rita Williams-Garcia humorously shows past and present colliding through an ancestral portal. Justina Irelands Kissing Sarah Smart is a sweet same-sex romance. Other stories deal with the loss of a sibling to suicide; the challenging of parental expectations; romance (a forbidden rendezvous with a secret crush at a drive-in); and a variety of other relatable themes. This collection seeks not merely to counteract societys idea of blackness but to expand it to its fullest expression; it shows teens examining, rebelling against, embracing, or simply existing within their own idea of blackness. Its a celebration of identity through vibrant narratives that will accurately communicate to all young people that they are enoughjust as they are. monique harris January/February 2019 p 109(c) Copyright 2018. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

*Starred Review* What is it like to be young and black, and yet not black enough at the same time? That's the question explored in this poignant collection of stunning short stories by black rock-star authors, including Justina Ireland, Jason Reynolds, Nic Stone, and Brandy Colbert. The stories center on the experience of black teens, while driving home the fact that they are not a monolith; one person's experiences, reality, and personal identity can be completely different from another's. Family, friends, belonging, isolation, classism, and romance are among the topics that take center stage, and the stories' teens come from a diverse array of backgrounds (e.g., economic, neighborhood, country of origin). Readers glimpse the struggles, achievements, heartaches, and joys of a host of black teens who are authentically and lovingly portrayed. From the kid with two black parents to the mixed-race kid with one black parent, all of the characters grapple with the heart-wrenching question most real-life black teens struggle with (and never should need to): Am I black enough? The additional magic of this collection is that it shirks off the literary world's tired obsession with only depicting the struggles of black teens. With this, readers see everyday struggles as well as the ordinary yet remarkable joys of black teens that have nothing to do with the trauma of their history.--Enishia Davenport Copyright 2018 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-A compilation of short stories that offers unique perspectives on what it means to be young and black in America today. Each entry is deftly woven and full of such complex humanity that teens will identify with and see some of their own struggles in these characters. In Leah Henderson's "Warning: Color May Fade," a prep school girl examines the cost of being and remaining invisible in a world carefully crafted to exclude her. Two girls take the peer pressure of naked selfies and turn it on its head in "Girl, Stop Playing" by Liara Tamani. A group of young black boys dream up food creations heavily influenced by the flavors of other cultures in "The Ingredients" by Jason Reynolds. This collection presents the beauty of black humanity in all its many forms. The teens in these tales are dealing with mental health issues, complicated family dynamics, sexuality and gender constraints, and being part of a marginalized group. The entries offer a rich tableau of the black teen diaspora in an accessible way. VERDICT A great volume for all libraries serving young adults.-Desiree Thomas, Worthington Library, OH © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

A diverse and compelling fiction anthology that taps 17 established, rising star, and new #ownvoices talents.Editor Zoboi (Pride, 2018, etc.) lays out the collection's purpose: exploring black interconnectedness, traditions, and identity in terms of how they apply to black teens. Given that scope, that most stories are contemporary realistic fiction makes sense (Rita Williams-Garcia's humorous "Whoa!" which dips into the waters of speculative fiction, is a notable exception). Conversely, the characters are incredibly varied, as are the narrative styles. Standouts include the elegant simplicity of Jason Reynolds' "The Ingredients," about a group of boys walking home from the swimming pool; Leah Henderson's "Warning: Color May Fade," about an artist afraid to express herself; the immediacy of Tracey Baptiste's "Gravity," about a #MeToo moment of self-actualization birthed from violation; Renee Watson's reflection on family in "Half a Moon"; and the collection's namesake, Varian Johnson's "Black Enough," which highlights the paradigm shift that is getting woke. In these stories, black kids are nerds and geeks, gay and lesbian, first gen and immigrants, outdoorsy and artists, conflicted and confused, grieving and succeeding, thriving and survivingin short, they're fully human. No collection could represent the entire spectrum of blackness, however, the presence of trans, Afro-Latinx, and physically disabled characters is missed: a clarion call for more authentic black-centric collections.A breath of fresh air and a sigh of long overdue relief. Nuanced and necessary. (contributor biographies) (Anthology. 12-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.