Cover image for Like a lizard
Title:
Like a lizard
ISBN:
9781629792118
Edition:
First edition.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 x 29 cm
Reading Level:
200 Lexile.
Added Author:
Summary:
The attributes of 28 different lizards are revealed in this STEM nonfiction picture book, while the story provides a subtle message encouraging children to be true to their own nature. The actions of 28 lizard species--the flying dragon that swoops through the air, the shingleback that sticks out its blue tongue to scare predators, the basilisk that can race across the surface of water--invite readers to act like a lizard themselves. The text by noted author April Pulley Sayre asks: "Can you run like a lizard? Sun like a lizard? Bob your head like a lizard?" Featuring brilliantly colorful, textured artwork by illustrator Stephanie Laberis, the book also includes extensive back matter with further information about the featured lizard species--their size, geographical range, why they perform the various actions introduced in the text--as well as details about lizards in general.
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Summary

Summary

The actions of 28 lizard species--the flying dragon that swoops through the air, the shingleback that sticks out its blue tongue to scare predators, the basilisk that can race across the surface of water--invite readers to act like a lizard themselves. The text by noted author April Pulley Sayre asks- "Can you run like a lizard? Sun like a lizard? Bob your head like a lizard?" Featuring brilliantly colorful, textured artwork by illustrator Stephanie Laberis, the book also includes extensive back matter with further information about the featured lizard species--their size, geographical range, why they perform the various actions introduced in the text--as well as details about lizards in general.


Author Notes

April Pulley Sayre is the award-winning author of over 65 books for children, including Vulture View, which received the Geisel Award Honor; Stars Beneath Your Bed (an ALA Notable Book), Eat Like a Bear (an ALA Notable Book), and The Bumblebee Queen, which marked her third win of the John Burroughs Award. Sayre and her husband live in South Bend, Indiana. Visit her at aprilsayre.com.


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-There are thousands of lizard species that are so different from one another that their distinct characteristics make for the clever rhyming text that drives this book. Right from the start, a pattern is established with a question: "Can you run like a lizard / Sun like a lizard/ Bob your head like a lizard?" Questions are followed by bright, digitally rendered and labeled illustrations that represent the particular animals capable of performing these various actions. For further information, however, the reader must consult the back of the book, where there are more detailed entries for 28 lizard types. While not sufficient for in-depth research, these brief entries all include a physical description, a habitat fact, and an explanation as to why the author attributed a given behavior to a given creature. VERDICT This rhythmic, zippy work is packed with verbs printed in bold-faced type. Valuable not only for reptile enthusiasts but also as a mentor text for students working to expand their own writing vocabularies. A fun and useful purchase that a range of readers will enjoy.-Gloria Koster, formerly at West School, New Canaan, CT © Copyright 2019. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Can you behave like a lizard?Using a series of rhythmic triplets followed by two-syllable lines, Sayre invites young readers and listeners to imagine being a lizard. "Would you lunge like a lizard? / Sponge like a lizard? / Chew bugs like a lizard? / Mouth mash?" (A final page reminds readers to "Be you!") Once the reader-aloud masters the form, this text would be a delight for storytime, encouraging imitation. Laberis used digital media to create reasonably accurate paintings of the one (occasionally two) lizard that performs the behaviors described, often with a bit of natural background. Each animal shown is clearly labeled with its common name. These 28 lizards are described more fully in short paragraphs keyed to the behavior depicted and headed with the common name, Latin name, usual home, and length in the backmatter. Various expert herpetologists are credited with scientific review of this appealing work by nature-lover Sayre. Some pages include other animals: The opening spread shows an American badger chasing a six-lined racerunner, and the last shows a greater short-horned lizard defending itself from a coyote. These lizards come from around the world; they vary amazingly in shape, size, and habitat. Suggested further resources include both books and websites. An appealing invitation to look more closely at the world of lizards and a welcome addition to a nature shelf. (Informational picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Using a series of lyrically phrased questions ( Can you run like a lizard? Sun like a lizard? Bob your head like a lizard? One, two! ), Sayre spotlights 28 lizards, drawing attention to their most noteworthy behaviors and features. She mentions the prominent dewlaps (throat pouches) found on green anoles; the blue tongues that distinguish shingleback lizards; the insect-eating capabilities of red-headed rock agamas; and the swimming prowess of marine iguanas, among others. Laberis' brightly colored digital artwork brings these vividly hued creatures to life. She uses naturalized settings, but each species takes prominence in the art. Particularly striking are the greater short-horned lizard (depicted squirting blood at a coyote) and the green basilisk lizard, seen dashing through water to escape an eyelash viper. A final verse urges readers to refrain from emulating these creatures: No need to match like a lizard. Pretend don't defend like a lizard . . . Be you! Appended with extensive notes on the selected species, this makes a good STEM-themed read-aloud or introduction to herpetology units.--Kay Weisman Copyright 2019 Booklist