Cover image for Level 13 : a slacker novel
Title:
Level 13 : a slacker novel
ISBN:
9781338286205
Edition:
1st ed.
Physical Description:
241 pages ; 22 cm.
Summary:
Dedicated slacker Cameron Boxer thinks he has found gamer heaven: playing video games online for an audience (and money); but the Positive Action Group (the club he created to keep his parents off his back) keeps getting in the way with meetings and fund-raisers for worthy causes, and his friends keep turning to him for plans and girlfriend advice, plus Elvis the beaver is back chewing on the back wall--and all Cameron wants to do is to conquer the infamous level 13.
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Summary

Summary

From the bestselling author of Swindle , Restart , and Slacker is another hilarious story about an underachiever who learns to go above and beyond.Cameron Boxer, king of the slackers, has found something worth his time. By playing video games online in front of an audience he can find both fame AND fortune -- especially with Elvis (a beaver who seems to love video games as much as Cam) at his side.The only problem? Things keep getting in Cam's way. Like school. And the club he accidentally started. And the misguided people in his life who don't think beavers should be playing video games.It's going to take some trickery, some close calls, and a fierce devotion to slacking in order for Cam to get to his goal -- conquering the game's infamous Level 13. But if any slacker can do it, Cam can.


Author Notes

Gordon Korman was born in Montreal, Canada on October 23, 1963. When his 7th-grade English teacher told the class they could have 45 minutes a day for four months to work on a story of their choice, Korman began This Can't Be Happening at Macdonald Hall. He was also the class monitor for the Scholastic TAB Book Club, so he sent his novel to the address on the TAB flyer, and a few days after his 14th birthday, he had a book contract with Scholastic.

By the time he graduated from high school, he had published five other novels and several articles for Canadian newspapers. He received a BFA degree from New York University with a major in Dramatic Writing and a minor in Film and TV. He has written over 75 books for children and young adults including the Swindle series, The Juvie Three, and two books of poetry written by the fictional character Jeremy Bloom.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4--7--In this follow-up to Slacker, Cameron Boxer still just wants to play video games, and he thinks he's found the way to do it. If he can establish himself as a popular livestreamer with 50,000 subscribers, he can maintain his lifestyle. There are just a few problems: he has to keep his grades up or his parents will stop him from gaming; he's still president of his school's wildly popular Positive Action Group (P.A.G.), and those responsibilities really cut into gaming time; and right now, his stream has only eight followers. Cam inadvertently kills two birds with one stone. When he tells the P.A.G. members that he's stepping aside because of failing grades, enthusiastic Daphne takes on presidential duties and many supportive P.A.G. members start slipping Cam completed homework assignments on the sly. The problem of livestream followers is solved when Elvis the beaver proves to be an avid fan of gaming, and when he appears in Cam's stream, the feed blows up. Of course, if the P.A.G. learns that he's gaming rather than studying, and if Daphne discovers that he's removing Elvis from his habitat, it's not just the livestream that will blow up in Cam's face. This fast-paced, funny novel features short chapters from a variety of perspectives. Korman's humor and gaming references are on point, and reluctant readers will race through the book. Some may find the ending somewhat anticlimactic, but others will enjoy the irony. All will find that the story makes more sense if they have already read Slacker. VERDICT Purchase where the previous title is popular.--Misti Tidman, Mansfield/Richland County Public Library, OH


Kirkus Review

Can Cam hit 50,000 subscribers on his game stream? Not with distractions like schoolwork.In Slacker (2016), Cam Boxer tried to perpetuate his video game "lifestyle" by starting a fake do-gooder club at school; then everyone joined the Positive Action Group. Now it's so successful (and the eighth-grader is such a hero) that he has no time to game. He and his best friends, Chuck and Pavel, devise a scheme to convince the student body that Cam is failing and needs to study instead of running the P.A.G. This works, and Cam's stream takes off, especially after Cam starts playing a rare, early-release copy of "Guardians of Geldorf." But then his classmates, worried about their hero, start offering homework help; a mysterious stalker comes to town; and Chuck's budding relationship with P.A.G. second-in-command Daphne threatens both the game streaming and the three boys' friendship. This sequel, narrated, as before, by the threesome and a few others by turns, is more of the same. Cam is no more likable, as he lies and cheats his way to unearned success. Nothing here is actually believablea Zorro mask would not hide Cam's identityand a twist about questionable content in the game's early release is profoundly unexciting. As before, the cast defaults to white, with diversity largely cued via naming convention.Fans of Korman's school stories and caper novels may find this fluff just fun enough. (Fiction. 7-11) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

As they did in Slacker (2016), unintended consequences again haunt video gamer Cam Boxer, whose online audience skyrockets after he acquires a suppressed version of Guardians of Geldorf at a library discard sale and a live, game-addicted beaver for a sidekick. Making time for the game not only requires hiding his obsession from his parents but also passing off the presidency of the wildly popular Positive Action Group (PAG), a community service club at school, with the fib that he's failing eighth grade. It's a ploy that brings an unexpected (but guiltily accepted) side benefit in the form of homework done by sympathetic paggers. Ultimately, his closest friends grow cheesed off, his health takes a serious turn for the worse, and all the deception comes home to roost in a big, public way when he's named class valedictorian. Korman uses multiple narrators to tell the tale, throws in plenty of comical antics, and pointedly ends Guardians of Geldorf not with a bang but an anticlimactic whimper. Oh well the scene-stealing beaver alone is worth the price of admission.--John Peters Copyright 2019 Booklist