Cover image for Did you burp? : how to ask questions ... or not!
Title:
Did you burp? : how to ask questions ... or not!
ISBN:
9781580897372

9781580898423
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm.
Added Author:
Summary:
Describes what a question is, how to form one correctly, and when it is appropriate to ask one.
Holds:

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Summary

Summary

Asking questions may seem like it comes naturally, but it's actually a learned social skill. How do questions and answers work? What makes a good question--and what makes a rude one? Who cares about questions?

This helpful how-to guide teaches kids what a question is, when to ask one, and how to form one. Friendly tips and pointers ("Keep it short!" "Show interest!") help kids keep their questions appropriate and on point. Above all, the book encourages readers to keep on asking questions--the beginning of learning about the world.


Author Notes

April Pulley Sayre has done enough school visits to know that question formation can be tricky for kids. Faced with a "hilarious cascade of non-questions, sort-of-questions, and what-was-that questions" from her young audiences, she realized that a book was in order. April is the award-winning author of more than 65 nonfiction books for children and adults, including Trout Are Made of Trees ; Thank You, Earth ; Best in Snow ; The Slowest Book Ever ; and the Geisel Honor book Vulture View . Each year she speaks to more than 15,000 students--who ask her lots and lots of questions.

Leeza Hernandez is the illustrator of several books for children, including Eat Your Math Homework , Eat Your Science Homework , Eat Your U.S. History Homework , and Never Play Music Right Next to the Zoo . She is also the author and illustrator of Dog Gone! and Cat Napped! (Putnam). www.leezaworks.com


Reviews 3

Horn Book Review

"Questions are powerful." As a veteran of many, many school visits, Sayre knows a thing or ten about the why, what, when, where, and how of questions. In this more-than-an-etiquette guide, Sayre steers kids toward understanding and getting the most out of this tool. Beginning with the basic "why ask questions?" ("They help you get information"), the brief main text introduces different types of questions, how and when to ask them, and what a question is not ("A question doesn't tell a long story. If you are doing all the talking, you're probably not asking a question"). With their energetic cartoon vibe, Hernandez's digital-collage illustrations, featuring a diverse classroom of inquisitive kids, will draw readers in to this valuable communication lesson. The recurring characters' engaging and often funny speech-balloon dialogue effectively demonstrates Sayre's points. One concept receiving particular attention: "Asking the right question at the right time." When the president (depicted as a woman with brown skin) visits your school, it's appropriate to ask, "What do you like about your job?" Asking "Did you burp, Madam President?" is not. But: change the setting to a doctor's office and the questioner to a medical professional, and that question is completely okay. The bottom line for posing questions to authors, authority figures, or anyone: think before you ask. Kitty Flynn November/December 2019 p.119(c) Copyright 2019. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

What are questions, and what are they good for?On a beach, in a garden, visiting a museum, sitting in class with the president of the United States (a woman of color, as it happens), and elsewhere, a racially diverse and compulsively inquisitive group of children demonstrate the ins and outs of productive questioning: "Are you the new teacher?" "Is this a veggie burger?" "Do you know if walruses have ears?" "Where do you park Air Force One?" Sayre describes how speakers use words such as "who" or "where" plus intonation to formulate questions in English (with a brief excursion into Spanish: "Where is the gerbil?" "Dnde est el jerbo?"). In explaining that questions can express curiosity or care for others as well as simply act as requests for information, she also points out situational subtleties: "Did you burp, Madam President?" can be discomfiting in some contexts, for instance, but appropriate in, say, the course of a medical exam. She also suggests that "How" questions can "ask in a gentle way about feelings, tender topics, and complicated subjects," and that it's OK to make mistakes in the course of learning what works and when. Younger audiences, hard-wired to start asking questions from an early age, at last have a toolbox for formulating more and better ones. "So be brave," the author concludes. "Be bold. Ask questions!" Funny, thoughtful, and rewarding to read, no question. (Informational picture book. 6-9) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

A book about questions? Sayre helps young children, who are always inquisitive, understand questions' purpose, potential, and appropriateness. Digitally enhanced, patterned illustrations feature children with different skin tones, hair colors, and physical abilities in a variety of settings, from the classroom to the beach. In each locale, short text explains a facet of questioning, while the children provide examples through speech bubble questions and answers. The book begins with how questions originate, such as with a need to get information or from curiosity, and continues with how to ask them, particularly with words like who, when, and why. Educators will appreciate the section about asking the right questions at the right time. In this case, a school visit from a female president and the president getting a checkup in a doctor's office highlight the appropriateness of questions like How old are you? in different settings. And comments and stories? They're not questions! Sayre concludes with questions as catalysts to understanding the world around us, leaving readers wondering, why wasn't this thought-provoking book written sooner?--Angela Leeper Copyright 2010 Booklist


Excerpts

Excerpts

Why ask questions? Questions are powerful. They help you get information.  "What is the gerbil's name? What does he eat? Can I feed him?"  "Is this my desk?" "Why are our desks in a circle?" "Are you the new teacher?" "Where is my shoe?"  "Where is the bathroom?"  "What are you doing?"  "Who dropped this wrench?" Questions may start with needs.  "How long do we have for lunch?" "Do I have to stand in line?"  "Where are the trays?"  "May I have extra carrots?"  "Is this a veggie burger?" Excerpted from Did You Burp?: How to Ask Questions (or Not!) by April Pulley Sayre All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.