Cover image for Bad gateway
Title:
Bad gateway
ISBN:
9781683962076
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : chiefly color illustrations ; 31 cm.
Summary:
Perpetually drunk and high, lovable degenerates Megg and Mogg have drifted through a life full of raucous antics and free of consequences. But their heavy drug use, once a gateway to adventure, has begun to take a grim psychological toll. As her unstable lifestyle finally catches up to her, Megg must turn to her past to uncover the roots of her self-destructive habits that have led her down this dark path.
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Summary

Summary

Perpetually drunk and high, lovable degenerates Megg and Mogg have drifted through a life full of raucous antics and free of consequences. But their heavy drug use, once a gateway to adventure, has begun to take a grim psychological toll. As her unstable lifestyle finally catches up to her, Megg must turn to her past to uncover the roots of her self-destructive habits that have led her down this dark path.


Author Notes

Born 1981, Launceston, Tasmania. Simon Hanselmann's New York Times Best-Selling Megg, Mogg and Owl series has been translated into thirteen languages, nominated for multiple Ignatz and Eisner awards, and won Best Series at the Angoulème International Comics Festival in 2018. He currently lives in Seattle, Washington with his wife and a rotating cast of small animals.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Hanselmann's fifth Megg, Mogg & Owl collection, set after the events of the Eisner-winning Megg & Mogg in Amsterdam, finds its depressed, drug-addicted ensemble cast tumbling out of their arrested development and into a free fall of self-reflection. Whereas most previous volumes have existed in a realm outside of time and continuity, Owl's abrupt departure from the trio's shared home starts a ticking clock for red-headed witch Megg and her black cat partner Mogg, who have been tricking Owl (an owl) into paying their rent. As their desperation to escape their problems, and one another, skyrockets, so too does their drug and alcohol abuse. Megg's armor begins to crack as she uncovers the roots of her trauma in long-avoided childhood memories. In a surprising turn, Hanselmann's trademark raunchy dark humor is only rarely on display in this collection, making room instead for a stark, unblinking gaze into the heart of self-harm, mental illness, and addiction-a reminder that, despite their goofy, cartoonish aesthetic, each character is a monster in their own horror story. The grotesque stoner art style and sickly coloring remains consistent, with little evolution over the course of the series. But Hanselmann's storytelling sensibilities have matured here, with meditations on the makeup of a "bad person" that are tense, uncomfortable, and, appropriately enough, sobering. (July) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Witch Megg and cat Mogg are perpetually broke, eternally stoned lovers and roommates who drift through life, completely incapable of getting their acts together. Early in this fourth volume of their latest exploits, Megg takes desperate action to avoid losing her welfare benefits, while Mogg is forced to hunt for a job after his father cuts him off following the discovery of his secret Tumblr account. Later, they spend a day wandering around with their friend Werewolf Jones, looking for someone willing to buy an old pair of Megg's roller blades so they can afford drugs. Their misadventures begin hysterically funny but turn increasingly dark as their actions become more transparently self-destructive, climaxing with a flashback to their teenage years and revelations about Megg's mother that highlight the tragic origins of her inability to cope with reality. VERDICT Hanselmann (One More Year) is a phenomenally talented, internationally renowned cartoonist who switches between laugh-out-loud absurdist humor and startlingly raw scenes of extreme sadness from one panel to the next, and this is his finest, funniest, and most mature work to date.