Cover image for The food of Sichuan
Title:
The food of Sichuan
ISBN:
9781324004837
Edition:
First American edition.
Physical Description:
495 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 28 cm
General Note:
First published in the UK in 2001 by Michael Joseph as Sichuan Cookery and in the US in 2003 by W. W. Norton & Company as Land of Plenty.

This revised and updated edition first published in 2019 by Bloomsbury Publishing.
Added Author:
Summary:
Almost twenty years after the publication of Land of Plenty, considered by many to be one of the greatest cookbooks of all time, Fuchsia Dunlop revisits the region where her own culinary journey began, adding more than 70 new recipes to the original repertoire and accompanying them with mouthwatering descriptions of the dazzling flavors and textures of Sichuanese cooking. Food of Sichuan shows home cooks how to re- create classics such as Mapo Tofu, Twice-Cooked Pork and Gong Bao Chicken, or a traditional spread of cold dishes, including Bang Bang Chicken, Numbing-and-Hot Dried Beef, Spiced Cucumber Salad and Green Beans in Ginger Sauce. With gorgeous food and travel photography and enhanced by a culinary and cultural history of the region, The Food of Sichuan is a captivating insight into one of the world's greatest cuisines.
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Summary

Summary

Almost twenty years after the publication of Land of Plenty, considered by many to be one of the greatest cookbooks of all time, Fuchsia Dunlop revisits the region where her own culinary journey began, adding more than 70 new recipes to the original repertoire and accompanying them with mouthwatering descriptions of the dazzling flavors and textures of Sichuanese cooking.Food of Sichuan shows home cooks how to re- create classics such as Mapo Tofu, Twice-Cooked Pork and Gong Bao Chicken, or a traditional spread of cold dishes, including Bang Bang Chicken, Numbing-and-Hot Dried Beef, Spiced Cucumber Salad and Green Beans in Ginger Sauce. With gorgeous food and travel photography and enhanced by a culinary and cultural history of the region, The Food of Sichuan is a captivating insight into one of the world's greatest cuisines.


Author Notes

Fuchsia Dunlop is the author of Land of Fish and Rice, among other books. She has won four James Beard awards for her writing and lives in London.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

For more than a century, a bland and bastardized version of Cantonese cooking formed Americans' notion of Chinese food. But now U.S. eaters eagerly seek out the tongue-numbing adventure that is the cooking of China's Sichuan province. Dunlop, one of few Westerners to train as a professional chef in Chengdu, has revised and expanded her classic Land of Plenty (2003), and this new cookbook takes into account growing familiarity with Sichuan cooking and increasing availability of both fresh ingredients and necessary kitchen staples to produce genuine Sichuan cooking at home. Dunlop shares with her readers not merely recipes, but essays and instructive tables delineating the 23 flavors and 56 cooking methods of Sichuan. Dishes vary from simple stir-fries to elaborate stuffed steamed breads and dumplings. Some U.S. readers may find the use of metric measures in Dunlop's recipes a stumbling block to fully embracing these delicious foods. A bibliography and a glossary of Chinese characters will intrigue and inspire the most serious student cooks.--Mark Knoblauch Copyright 2010 Booklist


Library Journal Review

When Dunlop's Land of Plenty appeared in 2001, Sichuan cooking was not well known in the West; for many, a Sichuan dish meant adding peanuts or extra chiles. Dunlop's exhaustive work imploded that myth and presaged several food trends. Here the author offers a new, updated edition that includes fresh photographs, recipes, and recent food trends in the region, with some older recipes retested and tweaked. The focus remains on explicating the astonishing array of Sichuan flavors and techniques. Some dishes, such as dry-fried green beans, traditional dandan noodles, and strange flavor bang bang chicken, have become more prominent since the first edition, but many dishes will be new to Western palates, including scalded kidneys with fresh chilli and rabbit eaten cold. Dunlop was the first Westerner to be trained at the Sichuan Higher Institute of Cuisine, and while she does address home cooking, many of the recipes are inspired by banquet and restaurant cooking. Techniques are fully explained, but cooks will need to obtain several special ingredients. VERDICT With the original still considered one of the best sources on Sichuan cooking, this new edition is a must-have for anyone interested in authentic Chinese cuisine.--Devon Thomas, Chelsea, MI