Cover image for How to raise a reader
Title:
How to raise a reader
ISBN:
9781523505302
Physical Description:
xii, 202 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm.
Contents:
Born to read -- Growing a reader -- Your middle-grade reader -- A reader for life : teenagers -- More books to love : by theme and reading level.
Summary:
Do you remember your first visit to where the wild things are? How about curling up for hours on end to discover the secret of the Philosophers Stone? Combining clear, practical advice with inspiration, wisdom, tips, and curated reading lists, How to Raise a Reader, from the authors of the original and viral New York Times Books feature, shows you how to instil the joy and time-stopping pleasure of reading. Divided into four sections, from baby through teen, and each illustrated by a different artist, this book offers something useful on every page, whether its how to develop rituals around reading or build a family library, or ways to engage a reluctant reader. A fifth section, 'More Books to Love: By Theme and Reading Level,' is chockful of expert recommendations. Throughout, the authors debunk common myths, assuage parental fears, and deliver invaluable lessons in a positive and easy-to-act-on way.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Material Type
Call Number
Item Available
Copies
Status
Searching...
Book 649.58 PAU 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book 649.58 PAU 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book 649.58 PAU 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book 649.58 PAU 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book 649.58 PAU 1 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book 649.58 PAU 0 1
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Do you remember your first visit to where the wild things are? How about curling up for hours on end to discover the secret of the Philosopher's Stone? Combining clear, practical advice with inspiration, wisdom, tips, and curated reading lists, How to Raise a Reader, from the authors of the original and viral New York Times Books feature, shows you how to instil the joy and time-stopping pleasure of reading.

Divided into four sections, from baby through teen, and each illustrated by a different artist, this book offers something useful on every page, whether it's how to develop rituals around reading or build a family library, or ways to engage a reluctant reader. A fifth section, 'More Books to Love: By Theme and Reading Level,' is chockful of expert recommendations. Throughout, the authors debunk common myths, assuage parental fears, and deliver invaluable lessons in a positive and easy-to-act-on way.


Author Notes

Pamela Paul is the editor of The New York Times Book Review and oversees books coverage at The New York Times , which she joined in 2011 as the children's books editor. She is also the host of the weekly Book Review podcast for The Times . She is the author and editor of five books: My Life with Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books , Plot Ensues , The Starter Marriage and the Future of Matrimony , Pornified , Parenting, Inc. , and By the Book . She is a former columnist for The Economist , Worth , and The New York Times Styles section. Her work has also appeared in The Atlantic , The Washington Post , Slate , Vogue , Psychology Today , Brown Alumni Magazine and other national publications.

Maria Russo is the children's books editor of The New York Times Books Review . She has been a writer and editor at the Los Angeles Times , The New York Observer , and Salon, and holds a Ph.D. in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University. She lives in Montclair, New Jersey with her husband and three children.


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

Paul and Russo, respectively editor and children's book editor of the New York Times Book Review, bring parental and editorial knowledge to this practical, reassuring guide to encouraging children to read. Devoting different sections to different age levels, from infants through teenagers, the authors give recommended reading lists, with a mix of classics and newer titles, in each. Suggestions for fostering a love of reading in children include reading to one's newborn, giving books as birthday gifts and organizing used-book swaps as birthday party events, and encouraging teenagers to connect online with contemporary YA authors (Sarah Dessen, Brendan Kiely, and Tahereh Mafi are cited as particularly engaged writers). Writing in the second person, in a casual but fact-based style, Paul and Russo also seek to quell adult worries. For example, they assure their audience that while school curricula may push reading in kindergarten, "many perfectly bright children are simply not able to process the steps of independent reading before age 6 or 7." Furthermore, parents need to remember to leave the instruction to school, and to focus on enjoyment, "sprinkling the fairy dust around reading and books." With the bottom line that "If you want to raise a reader, be a reader," their primer is recommended for all worried parents and anyone looking for suggestions of what books to read or give to children. (Sept.)


Horn Book Review

It's hard not to compare their advice book to ours (A Family of Readers, 2010), and Paul and Russo do strike a similar tone to Sutton and Parravano: books are to be enjoyed; give your children time and space; don't panic. In the first four sections, the New York Times Book Review editors discuss books for babies and toddlers, emerging readers and independent readers, middle graders, and young adults. Recommended booklists appear regularly (with title, author, illustrator, and some jackets, but no publication info); the final section presents over a dozen additional booklists organized by age level within parent-friendly themes ("Books That Make Us Laugh," "Tearjerkers," "Family Stories"). The recommendations include plenty of "classics" and some solid modern-day favorites. Sidebars delve into such topics as reading aloud, visiting the library, and supporting struggling readers. Friendly spot art and occasional full-page images are included, with each of the illustrators' distinct styles well matched to the section he or she is covering. Ind. Elissa Gershowitz November/December 2019 p.130(c) Copyright 2019. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Savvy counsel and starter lists for fretting parents.New York Times Book Review editor Paul (My Life With Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues, 2017, etc.) and Russo, the children's book editor for that publication, provide standard-issue but deftly noninvasive strategies for making books and reading integral elements in children's lives. Some of it is easier said than done, but all is intended to promote "the natural, timeless, time-stopping joys of reading" for pleasure. Mediumwise, print reigns supreme, with mild approval for audio and video books but discouraging words about reading apps and the hazards of children becoming "slaves to the screen." In a series of chapters keyed to stages of childhood, infancy to the teen years, the authors supplement their advice with short lists of developmentally appropriate titlesby their lights, anyway: Ellen Raskin's Westing Game on a list for teens?all kitted out with enticing annotations. The authors enlarge their offerings with thematic lists, from "Books That Made Us Laugh" to "Historical Fiction." In each set, the authors go for a mix of recent and perennially popular favorites, leaving off mention of publication dates so that hoary classics like Janice May Udry's A Tree Is Nice seem as fresh as David Wiesner's Flotsam and Carson Ellis' Du Iz Tak? and sidestepping controversial titles and themes in the sections for younger and middle-grade readerswith a few exceptions, such as a cautionary note that some grown-ups see "relentless overparenting" in Margaret Wise Brown's Runaway Bunny. Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little House series doesn't make the cut except for a passing reference to its "troubling treatment of Indians." The teen lists tend to be edgier, salted with the provocative likes of Art Spiegelman's Maus and Angie Thomas' The Hate U Give, and a nod to current demands for more LGBTQ and other #ownvoices books casts at least a glance beyond the mainstream. Yaccarino leads a quartet of illustrators who supplement the occasional book cover thumbnails with vignettes and larger views of children happily absorbed in reading.Mostly conservative in its stance and choices but common-sensical and current. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Library Journal Review

New York Times Book Review editors Paul and Russo are the perfect candidates to guide us in raising children who love reading. Colorful and visually pleasing, this attractive text shares not only book lists but also "must-knows" for each age level, from toddlers to teens. For instance, reading for babies should involve all their senses, while four month olds appreciate lift-the-flap pages and feeling the textures of a book, as children are starting to develop good hand control at this age. Interruptions aren't a bad thing, state the authors, as they reveal whether your toddler is engaged and remind adults that each child views the world through their own eyes. Chapter ideas range from helping new readers engage other readers to building conversations and friendships around books to why paying for some downloads on Audible or iTunes may be the key to keeping your teen reading. VERDICT Bold and bright illustrations combine with varied recommendations for instilling a love of reading in children of all ages; a must-purchase for all collections.