Cover image for The right to be cold : one woman's fight to protect the Arctic and save the planet from climate change
Title:
The right to be cold : one woman's fight to protect the Arctic and save the planet from climate change
ISBN:
9781517904975
Physical Description:
xxvi, 337 pages ; 22 cm.
General Note:
Includes index.

Originally published: Toronto, Ontario, Canada : Allen Lane, 2015.
Contents:
Foreword / Bill McKibben -- Introduction -- 1. An Early Childhood of Ice and Snow -- 2. From Dog Teams to Miniskirts and Rock 'n' Roll -- 3. A Return Home -- 4. Finding Our Voice -- 5. POPs and the Inuit Journey -- 6. The Voices of the Hunters -- 7. The Right to Be Cold -- 8. Acclaim from Outside, Peace from Within -- 9. Citizens of the World -- Conclusion: Bridging Old and New, North and South -- Acknowledgments -- Index.
Personal Subject:
Summary:
A "courageous and revelatory memoir" (Naomi Klein) chronicling the life of the leading Indigenous climate change, cultural, and human rights advocate. For the first ten years of her life, Sheila Watt-Cloutier traveled only by dog team. Today there are more snow machines than dogs in her native Nunavik, a region that is part of the homeland of the Inuit in Canada. In Inuktitut, the language of Inuit, the elders say that the weather is Uggianaqtuq--behaving in strange and unexpected ways. The Right to Be Cold is Watt-Cloutier's memoir of growing up in the Arctic reaches of Quebec during these unsettling times. It is the story of an Inuk woman finding her place in the world, only to find her native land giving way to the inexorable warming of the planet. She decides to take a stand against its destruction. The Right to Be Cold is the human story of life on the front lines of climate change, told by a woman who rose from humble beginnings to become one of the most influential Indigenous environmental, cultural, and human rights advocates in the world. Raised by a single mother and grandmother in the small community of Kuujjuaq, Quebec, Watt-Cloutier describes life in the traditional ice-based hunting culture of an Inuit community and reveals how Indigenous life, human rights, and the threat of climate change are inextricably linked. Colonialism intervened in this world and in her life in often violent ways, and she traces her path from Nunavik to Nova Scotia (where she was sent at the age of ten to live with a family that was not her own); to a residential school in Churchill, Manitoba; and back to her hometown to work as an interpreter and student counselor. The Right to Be Cold is at once the intimate coming-of-age story of a remarkable woman, a deeply informed look at the life and culture of an Indigenous community reeling from a colonial history and now threatened by climate change, and a stirring account of an activist's powerful efforts to safeguard Inuit culture, the Arctic, and the planet. --
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Summary

Summary

A "courageous and revelatory memoir"(Naomi Klein) chronicling the life of the leading Indigenous climate change, cultural, and human rights advocate For the first ten years of her life, Sheila Watt-Cloutier traveled only by dog team. Today there are more snow machines than dogs in her native Nunavik, a region that is part of the homeland of the Inuit in Canada. In Inuktitut, the language of Inuit, the elders say that the weather is Uggianaqtuq--behaving in strange and unexpected ways. The Right to Be Cold is Watt-Cloutier's memoir of growing up in the Arctic reaches of Quebec during these unsettling times. It is the story of an Inuk woman finding her place in the world, only to find her native land giving way to the inexorable warming of the planet. She decides to take a stand against its destruction.The Right to Be Cold is the human story of life on the front lines of climate change, told by a woman who rose from humble beginnings to become one of the most influential Indigenous environmental, cultural, and human rights advocates in the world. Raised by a single mother and grandmother in the small community of Kuujjuaq, Quebec, Watt-Cloutier describes life in the traditional ice-based hunting culture of an Inuit community and reveals how Indigenous life, human rights, and the threat of climate change are inextricably linked. Colonialism intervened in this world and in her life in often violent ways, and she traces her path from Nunavik to Nova Scotia (where she was sent at the age of ten to live with a family that was not her own); to a residential school in Churchill, Manitoba; and back to her hometown to work as an interpreter and student counselor. The Right to Be Cold is at once the intimate coming-of-age story of a remarkable woman, a deeply informed look at the life and culture of an Indigenous community reeling from a colonial history and now threatened by climate change, and a stirring account of an activist's powerful efforts to safeguard Inuit culture, the Arctic, and the planet.


Author Notes

Sheila Watt-Cloutier is one of four winners of the 2015 Right Livelihood Awards (also called the "alternative Nobels") for her work on climate change in the Arctic. In 2007 she was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize for her advocacy in showing the impact of global climate change on human rights. She has been awarded the Aboriginal Achievement Award, the UN Champion of the Earth Award, and the prestigious Norwegian Sophie Prize. She has received honorary doctorates from twenty universities for her pioneering work linking climate change to human rights. From 1995 to 2002, she served as the elected Canadian president of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, and in 2002 she was elected its international chair. Under her leadership, the world's first international legal action on climate change was launched with a petition to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

Bill McKibben is a founder of 350.org and the Schumann Distinguished Professor in Residence at Middlebury College in Vermont. He is a 2014 recipient of the Right Livelihood Award and is a founding fellow of the Sanders Institute. He has written a dozen books about the environment.



Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Multi-award-winning activist Watt-Cloutier, who was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for her work on climate change and its impact on human rights, pens a fascinating memoir of her life as an Inuk woman and the changes she has seen in her community. As a child, after being sent away from her native Quebec to attend school in Nova Scotia and Manitoba, Watt-Cloutier learned to adjust to new ways that didn't include education on traditional Inuit subjects, almost losing her native tongue in the process. Over the years she works on Inuit education issues, including the dangers of persistent organic pollutants in the Arctic, the effects of climate change, and the subsequent melting ice that threaten Inuit communities, from the swamping of coastal villages to preventing traditional hunting techniques. Working as an employee and as an elected official, Watt-Cloutier advocates tirelessly for northern communities to protect the Inuit and their way of life. VERDICT A detailed, compelling portrait of a woman chronicling her dedication to protecting Inuit culture. This memoir will appeal to readers who enjoy books about environmental activism and indigenous cultures.-Sue O'Brien, Downers Grove, IL © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.