Cover image for How to cocktail : recipes and techniques for building the best drinks
Title:
How to cocktail : recipes and techniques for building the best drinks
ISBN:
9781945256943
Physical Description:
ix, 262 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
General Note:
Includes index.
Contents:
Built -- Stirred -- Shaken -- Muddled and infused -- Blended -- Big batch -- Syrups, shrubs, bitters, and garnishes -- Homemade liqueurs and vermouths -- How about snacks?
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Genre:
Added Corporate Author:
Summary:
All the kitchen secrets, techniques, recipes, and inspiration you need to craft transcendent cocktails, from essential, canonical classics to imaginative all-new creations from America's Test Kitchen. Cocktail making is part art and part science--just like cooking. The first-ever cocktail book from America's Test Kitchen brings our objective, kitchen-tested and -perfected approach to the craft of making cocktails. You always want your cocktail to be something special--whether you're in the mood for a simple Negroni, a properly muddled Caipirinha, or a big batch of Margaritas or Bloody Marys with friends. After rigorous recipe testing, we're able to reveal not only the ideal ingredient proportions and best mixing technique for each drink, but also how to make homemade tonic for your Gin and Tonic, and homemade sweet vermouth and cocktail cherries for your Manhattan. And you can't simply quadruple any Margarita recipe and have it turn out right for your group of guests--to serve a crowd, the proportions must change. You can always elevate that big-batch Margarita, though, with our Citrus Rim Salt or Sriracha Rim Salt. How to Cocktail offers 150 recipes that range from classic cocktails to new America's Test Kitchen originals. Our two DIY chapters offer streamlined recipes for making superior versions of cocktail cherries, cocktail onions, flavored syrups, rim salts and sugars, bitters, vermouths, liqueurs, and more. And the final chapter includes a dozen of our test cooks' favorite cocktail-hour snacks. All along the way, we solve practical challenges for the home cook, including how to make an array of cocktails without having to buy lots of expensive bottles, how to use a Boston shaker, what kinds of ice are best and how to make them, and much more.
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Summary

Summary

All the kitchen secrets, techniques, recipes, and inspiration you need to craft transcendent cocktails, from essential, canonical classics to imaginative all-new creations from America's Test Kitchen.

Cocktail making is part art and part science--just like cooking. The first-ever cocktail book from America's Test Kitchen brings our objective, kitchen-tested and -perfected approach to the craft of making cocktails. You always want your cocktail to be something special--whether you're in the mood for a simple Negroni, a properly muddled Caipirinha, or a big batch of Margaritas or Bloody Marys with friends. After rigorous recipe testing, we're able to reveal not only the ideal ingredient proportions and best mixing technique for each drink, but also how to make homemade tonic for your Gin and Tonic, and homemade sweet vermouth and cocktail cherries for your Manhattan. And you can't simply quadruple any Margarita recipe and have it turn out right for your group of guests--to serve a crowd, the proportions must change. You can always elevate that big-batch Margarita, though, with our Smoked Rim Salt or Sriracha Rim Salt. How to Cocktail offers 125 recipes that range from classic cocktails to new America's Test Kitchen originals. Our two DIY chapters offer streamlined recipes for making superior versions of cocktail cherries, cocktail onions, flavored syrups, rim salts and sugars, bitters, vermouths, liqueurs, and more. And the final chapter includes a dozen of our test cooks' favorite cocktail-hour snacks. All along the way, we solve practical challenges for the home cook, including how to make an array of cocktails without having to buy lots of expensive bottles, how to use a Boston shaker, what kinds of ice are best and how to make them, and much more.


Author Notes

Bridget Lancaster is the host of America's Test Kitchen and the host of Cook's Country from America's Test Kitchen, as well as a regular contributor to the public radio program The Splendid Table. She began working as a test cook for Cook's Illustrated in 1998 and is an original cast member of both television shows. Bridget is the lead instructor for the America's Test Kitchen Online Cooking School. Julia Collin Davison is the host of America's Test Kitchen and the host of Cook's Country from America's Test Kitchen. She began working as a test cook for Cook's Illustrated in 1999 and is an original cast member of both television shows. Julia leads the recipe development team working on America's Test Kitchen cookbooks. America's Test Kitchen is well-known for its top-rated television shows with more than 4 million weekly public television viewers, bestselling cookbooks, magazines, websites, and cooking school. The highly reputable and recognizable brands of America's Test Kitchen, Cook's Illustrated, and Cook's Country are the work of over 60 passionate chefs based in Boston, Massachusetts, who put ingredients, cookware, equipment, and recipes through objective, rigorous testing to identify the very best. Discover, learn, and expand your cooking repertoire with Julia Collin Davison, Bridget Lancaster, Jack Bishop, Dan Souza, Lisa McManus, Tucker Shaw, Bryan Roof, and our fabulous team of test cooks!


Reviews 3

Publisher's Weekly Review

With their trial-and-error approach for perfection, the America's Test Kitchen cooks step away from the stove for this, their first cocktail manual. The book includes a broad spectrum of precise classic and updated recipes: Irish coffee is sampled at a variety of java to whiskey proportions and with three different types of sugar before landing on a four-to-one ratio sweetened with basic simple syrup; a more radical caffeinated concoction, turning up in a chapter of shaken beverages, is an espresso martini that substitutes rum and Bénédictine for the traditional vodka. Equally daring, among the stirred offerings is the new-fashioned gin and tonic, which employs a tonic syrup rather than the effervescent version to create a still and stiff quaff made for a rocks glass. For fans of vegetables, there's a celery gimlet as well as the Alcachofa, which blends tequila with the artichoke-based liqueur Cynar. Party hosts will welcome the chapter of "big batch" recipes while teetotalers will appreciate the numerous nonalcoholic offerings including the Sicilian sojourn, made with tarragon and blood orange juice. The concluding chapters offer a vast assortment of homemade syrups, bitters, rim salts and sugars, liqueurs, and vermouths. Foolproof and high-proof, this thoroughly researched and easy to follow volume will steady the hand of any home mixologist. (Oct.)


Booklist Review

Fledgling bartenders should run, not walk, to borrow the first cocktail-focused guide from America's Test Kitchen (ATK). Without a doubt, it's one of the most comprehensive introductions to a centuries-old art and science, beginning with nearly 10 critical principles of cocktailing, such as using higher-quality ingredients and always measuring (never just eyeballing it). And instead of categorizing the 100-plus drinks by type of spirit, the editors focus on the five ways drinks are made, with the assertion that technique is everything: built, stirred, shaken, muddled, and blended. Each recipe features a photograph and a long note (one of ATK's hallmarks) on why this recipe works (usually including historical tidbits, the contemporary embellishments, and creation), followed by the directions. Other chapters focus on drinks to make in big batches, syrups and shrubs, homemade liqueurs and vermouths, and particular attention to accompanying snacks, whether dips, mixes, or the perfect cheese plate. Pass the asparagus puffs and another celery gimlet. Includes a resource guide and reference for conversions.--Barbara Jacobs Copyright 2010 Booklist


Library Journal Review

The first cocktail book from America's Test Kitchen is a primer on mixology, beginning with an overview of base spirits and liqueurs, juices, syrups, and bitters. The editors recommend the bottles and tools that are essential to stock a liquor cabinet, as well as the strictly additional purchases. Two pages of Helpful Cocktail Lists focus on figuring out exactly what to make based on what's in your home bar: One-Bottle Cocktails, Three-Ingredient Cocktails, Low-Alcohol Cocktails, Nonalcoholic Cocktails, and Spirit-Only Cocktails. Chapters are separated by the way a drink is constructed--built in a glass, shaken (with instructions on how to master the shaker), muddled, blended, and batched for a crowd. The cocktails are predominantly classics, such as a Ramos gin fizz, hot toddy, mint julep, and sidecar, along with some original concoctions, including a kiwi blossom, which is made with cucumber and homemade Jasmine liqueur. An intriguing chapter offers recipes for DIY liqueurs and vermouths, and the book finishes with a chapter of cocktail party snacks. Little surprises, but the straightforward explanations and attractive photos make this a handy guide. VERDICT A thorough and helpful introduction to cocktail making from the perspective of the home cook.--Katy Hershberger, School Library Journal