Cover image for My drunk kitchen holidays! : how to savor and celebrate the year
Title:
My drunk kitchen holidays! : how to savor and celebrate the year
ISBN:
9780525541431
Edition:
1st ed.
Physical Description:
211 pages : color illustrations, color portraits ; 24 cm.
Contents:
January -- New Year's Day: 1/1 -- My Bread Basket of Bliss -- Trivia Day: 1/4 -- Juice Don't Worry About It -- Play God Day: 1/9 -- Globe Cake -- Vision Board Day: Second Saturday of the Month -- V Is for Visionary -- Febuary -- Valentine's Day: 2/14 -- Sweet and Savory Cupcakes -- Singles Awareness Day: 2/15 -- Acceptance Avocado Toast -- Drink Wine Day: 2/18 -- Simple Pasta and Wine -- Clam Chowder Day: 2/2S -- Sexy Date-Night Oysters -- March -- Get Over it Day; 3/9 -- A List of My Favorite Salts -- Pack Your Lunch Day' 3/10 -- Pickling -- Ravioli Day: 3/30 -- Ravioli a la (Conflict) Resolution -- I Am in Control Day: 3/30 -- Egg Blessings -- April -- April Fools' Day: 4/1 -- Ten My Drunk Kitchen Foibles -- Walking Day: First Wednesday of the Month -- Facts About Sleepiness -- Love Our Children Day: Probably the First Saturday of the Month (And Easter Too. Kind Of) -- How to Make a Jesus Egg -- Earth Day' 4/22 -- Doomsday Prep -- May

(Me) Loyalty Day: 5/1 -- For Your Face -- Eat What You Want Day: 5/11 -- Secret Stash -- Mother's Day: Second Sunday of the Month -- Tiny Chef Competition -- Be a Millionaire Day: 5/20 -- Overnight Oats -- June -- Pride: Taste the Rainbow: Month of June -- Flag Day: 6/14 -- Rainbow Cake -- Father's Day: Third Sunday of the Month -- The Five Elements -- Summer Solstice: 6/21 -- Mead Your Maker -- July -- Independence Day: 7/4 -- Deviled Eggs -- Ice Cream Day: Third Sunday of the Month -- Ice Cream -- Hot Dog Day: 7/17 -- Hot Dogs -- Lipstick Day: 7/29 -- Watermelon Marg -- August -- Middle Child's Day: 8/12 -- Blintz, Baby -- Left-Hander's Day: 8/13 -- Left-Hander's Day -- Dog Day: 8/26 -- Foods That Are Safe for Dogs -- Just Because Day: 8/27 -- Drinking (Twenties vs. Thirties) -- September -- Labor Day: First Monday of the Month -- How to Strap a Watermelon to Your Body Using Duct Tape -- Cheese Pizza Day: 9/5 -- Postcollege Cooking Advice

Video Games Day: 9/12 -- List o'Snacks That Won't Destroy Your Body (Immediately) -- Love People Day: 9/30 -- Kale Chips -- October -- Mental Health Day: 10/10 -- Raw Beef and Salmon for Cats -- Freethought Day: 10/12 -- Pasta from the Heart (of a Non-Vampire) -- Color Day: 10/22 -- Candied Apples -- Halloween: 10/31 -- Smoking Spicy Potion -- November -- Thanksgiving: Fourth Thursday of the Month -- Garlic-Ass Mashed Potatoes -- A Great Gravy -- Green Bean Casserole -- Black Olive Stuffing -- Decmber -- Cookie Day: 12/4 -- Christmas Cookies -- Hanukkah: Starts on the 25th Day of Kislev. Usually But Not Always in December -- Love the Way You Latke -- Winter Solstice: 12/21 -- Cozy Corn -- Champagne Day: 12/31 -- How to Not Save Champagne.
Genre:
Summary:
New York Times bestselling author and Food Network star Hannah Hart is back with her biggest book ever: a humorous holiday cookbook celebrating year-round festivities with food, drink, and friends. In a world where everyone is looking for some good news and something to celebrate, Hannah Hart is there with almost fifty ideas, arranged into twelve months of themes and recipes for how to celebrate with family and friends. A collection of recipes, activities, and suggestions about hilarious and joyous ways to celebrate with family, friends, pets, and your entire community, My Drunk Kitchen Holidays! will commemorate holidays from Valentine's Day to Graduation, Pride Month and International Left-Handers' Day (really!). The book will culminate with the fall holidays that get much deserved attention: recipes for Halloween, Thanksgiving, and a celebration of Hanukkah/Kwanzaa/Christmas that is festive, inclusive, and incredibly hilarious.
Holds:

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Book 641.568 HAR 1 1
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Book 641.568 HAR 1 1
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Book 641.568 HAR 1 1
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On Order

Summary

Summary

In a world where everyone is looking for some good news and something to celebrate, Hannah Hart is there with almost fifty ideas, arranged into twelve months of themes and recipes for how to celebrate with family and friends.

A collection of recipes, activities, and suggestions about hilarious and joyous ways to celebrate with family, friends, pets, and your entire community, My Drunk Kitchen Holidays! will commemorate holidays from Valentine's Day to Graduation, Pride Month and International Left-Handers' Day (really!). The book will cumulate with the fall holidays that get much deserved attention- recipes for Halloween, Thanksgiving, and a celebration of Hanukkah/Kwanzaa/Christmas that is festive, inclusive, and incredibly hilarious.


Author Notes

Hannah Hart is an author, YouTube personality, actress, producer, and philanthropist. She was born in Colorado in 1986. The University of California, Berkeley is her alma mater, graduating with degrees in English literature and the Japanese language. She worked in New York City as a proofreader of Japanese and English. She started a YouTube channel series, My Drunkin Kitchen and soon after quit her translation job. She is the author of My Drunkin Kitchen, and Buffering: Unshared Tales of a Life Fully Loaded, which has become a bestseller. Her work in films includes Camp Takota (with Grace Helbig and Mamrie Hart), Electra Woman and Dyna Girl, and Dirty30. She is the founder of the Have a Hart Day initiative, helping young leaders volunteer.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Excerpts

Excerpts

Introduction Dear Hannah, I can't believe you've written your third book! This has been a hard one, huh? That's okay. You've only just learned how to savor and celebrate the year, so it's pretty ambitious of you to think you could teach others to do the same. But what's another word for "ambition"? "Arrogance." Just kidding. Wow. Don't take yourself too seriously over there, kiddo. You may be thirty--two and have two other books under your belt, but every creative craft is different. Especially this one. Remember when you wrote your first book? My Drunk Kitchen: A Guide to Eating, Drinking, and Going with Your Gut---that seems like so long ago now, doesn't it? Over two hundred pages of heartfelt gibberish and photos taken in an apartment you lived in for less than a year. And recipes that some people actually wanted to make! Wild. It's even more wild to think that you've signed copies of that book for the last six years since it was published. Six years! Congratulations, buddy. Oh, and then you wrote Buffering: Unshared Tales of a Life Fully Loaded---that was a doozy, wasn't it? A book that surmised your entire life to date. An autobiography. The book you've always wanted to write about homelessness, and family, and love, and mental health. The book that took years off your life and then put them back on. A book made from equal parts tears and joy. A book that showed you so much shared community that you never knew how to find but always wanted. Remember the day the book came out and you cried the whole plane ride home---reading the reviews online and in the New York Times? Holy hell, Hannah! There's a lot to be proud of, isn't there? Oh, what's that? You don't know how to be proud? You don't know how to slow down and take it all in? Or even pat yourself on the back for a job well done? Well, you're in luck cuz this book is for YOU! Over the last few years, I've spent a lot of time celebrating. Books, movies, TV shows, etc. There's been a lot to do. Now that all the above has slowed down (for the time being!), there's not much left to celebrate, is there? WRONG. There's a LOT to celebrate. And you can celebrate all year long! The Holidays (capital H for the big ones) can be equal parts exhilirating and exhausting. And that's not really fair considering it's your chance to let loose and take a break. That got me thinking . . . is there a smaller way to savor and celebrate all year long? That way, the months prior to "The Holidays" don't have to be a constant trudge toward obligatory hosting and family time. How do you even host something, anyway? And why do you love your family so much but feel so drained after seeing them? This book seeks to answer all those questions and more. And to give some shout--outs and recognition to the lesser holidays that so often get passed over. Holidays like: Middle Child's Day! Left--Hander's Day! Just Get Over It Day! Be a Millionaire Day! . . . and so many more! It's pretty cool that you've written another cookbook to pass along some tips and tricks to others. You're pretty lucky to get to attend a lot of celebrations throughout the year. Now, your job is to share that with others and keep the party going! (In a refreshing and relaxing way, of course.) So let's take a look at how you did, shall we? I really hope this book doesn't suck. I've been looking forward to reading it. Even if it did suck, the act of writing it and finishing it is definitely something worth celebrating. So let's bust open a bottle, baby. Don't save champagne. Love, Hannah P.S. For real, though . . . I hope this book is good.   ***************************** I've never liked the phrase "good things come to those who wait." It leaves me feeling empty and impatient. Every time someone tells me that, a sense of helplessness sparks within me. I appreciate the thought. The idea that patience will proffer its own reward is a lovely sentiment. But it doesn't click. Maybe I need a more grounded example-- something to symbolize the "good things" that will "come" after "waiting." Without one, it's hard to get a sense of the weight behind the words. What are the "good things"? A romantic partner? Or is it a personal goal? A professional one? I've seen friends run the corporate track waiting for the recognition of their efforts, and if that recognition doesn't come, then does that mean that they don't get any good things? And what about the idea that good things are going to "come" and appear before you? What's taking them so long? What are the good things off doing out there in the world? And then there is the waiting. For me, "wait" is one of the most active verbs. To wait is to ruminate. To wait is to subjugate (yourself). Waiting is a skill, in my opinion. Being patient allows you to sit in a state of being. To be patient you must become patient. Being patient can be practiced. Waiting implies anticipation, which to me is the opposite of acceptance. Now, are you ready for me to blow your mind? The maxim actually stems from a poem. And it's not "good things"; it's "all things." And guess what? The poem doesn't have a happy ending. As it was written by Lady Mary Montgomerie Currie in the nineteenth century: Ah! "All things come to those who wait"-- (I say these words to make me glad). But something answers soft and sad -- "They come, but often come too late!" The poem is essentially about a missed connection. About two people whose love for each other never timed up right. She loved him, but he wasn't interested. When he gained interest, she lost hers. One (or both) of them had in fact been waiting too long. The timing never worked out. Now you could look at this and say, "See, but if they had just waited, their love would have lined up correctly!" To this I'd like to say nay. Their love wasn't meant to be because the timing didn't work out. You can't wait for someone else's rejection to spur their epiphany. In fact, you can't wait for someone else's anything at all! Again, waiting is not the same as being patient. Being patient means that you understand and acknowledge why the delay is necessary. It's similar to mutual love or affection. Agreed upon by both parties. Waiting is anticipation. And anticipation is the opposite of acceptance. So next time someone is encouraging you to just sit back and wait, remember the California avocado. Remember the fourteen to eighteen months it took to lead to that moment of consumption. Don't be too eager. Don't be too shy. Accept the timing it takes to get the things you want. Making my favorite avocado toast is pretty simple, but it will take you more than zero seconds in the morning, so it's best to time it and not to rush. You deserve at least thirty minutes for your first meal of the day, right? It'll only take five minutes to make it, but if you want to enjoy it, you're gonna need to slow down. ACCEPTANCE AVOCADO TOAST Ingredients 1 appropriately-waited-for California avocado Garlic-infused olive oil Lemon Sea salt Cracked red pepper Your favorite kind of toasty toast 1. Cut the avocado in half and admire the perfect circle of the pit. You'll know you've timed it right when the pit looks smooth and dark. There shouldn't be a bunch of avocado residue on it--that means the avocado wasn't ready to let go. 2. Scoop half out into a small, stylish bowl. You're making avocado toast, dammit. Gotta look good while doing it. 3. Add lemon. I like a truly excessive amount of lemon in my life. I love the color. I love the acid. I just love this citrus so damn much. If you're feeling like you want texture, you can even zest a little of the lemon into it, but that's a move you can make later on. For now you just wanna try to make this tasty thing. 4. Add sea salt to taste. Maybe throw some black pepper in there if ya want. 5. Drizzle a small amount of garlic-infused olive oil and mush it all together. The olive oil will help the avocado become creamy and more accepting of the other flavors you've added. If you feel like it's more clunky than creamy, either add more oil or just deal with it and move on. Nobody's perfect. Not even avocados. 6. Toss a pinch of cracked red pepper on top and call it a day. Or rather, start your day. This is a breakfast food, dammit, and I just want to make sure you guys get a chance to know how tasty a semi-hasty breakfast can be. Excerpted from My Drunk Kitchen Holidays!: How to Savor and Celebrate the Year by Hannah Hart All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.