Cover image for Little legends : exceptional men in black history
Title:
Little legends : exceptional men in black history
ISBN:
9780316475143
Edition:
1st ed.
Physical Description:
86 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm.
Added Author:
Summary:
Profiles thirty-five prominent men in African American history, including James Armistead Lafayette, Thurgood Marshall, Alvin Ailey, and Leland Melvin.
Holds:

Available:*

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On Order

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Stillwater Public Library1On Order

Summary

Summary

New York Times bestselling author-illustrator Vashti Harrison shines a bold, joyous light on black men through history.
An important book for readers of all ages, this beautifully illustrated and engagingly written volume brings to life true stories of black men in history.
Among these biographies, readers will find aviators and artists, politicians and pop stars, athletes and activists. The exceptional men featured include artist Aaron Douglas, civil rights leader John Lewis, dancer Alvin Ailey, filmmaker Oscar Micheaux, musician Prince, photographer Gordon Parks, tennis champion Arthur Ashe, and writer James Baldwin.
The legends in this book span centuries and continents, but what they have in common is that each one has blazed a trail for generations to come.


Author Notes

Vashti Harrison earned her MFA in Film/Video from CalArts and BA from the University of Virginia. Her experimental films and documentaries have shown around the world at film festivals. After a brief stint in television as a production coordinator, she is now a freelance graphic designer and a picture-book illustrator (books forthcoming from S&S and HarperCollins). She lives in Brooklyn, NY.


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Gr 3--7--Harrison's biographies of trailblazing men are brief enough for elementary school children but enjoyable for readers of any age. The subjects include Benjamin Banneker, the inventor of the first full-size clock; Thurgood Marshall, the first African American member of the U.S. Supreme Court; and André Leon Talley, former editor-at-large for American Vogue. Harrison's ideas are thoughtful, thorough, and accessible. She acknowledges that not every exceptional black man in history could be included and adds several mini-biographies at the back of the book with accompanying illustrations. VERDICT This striking book will resonate with readers in search of biographies of pioneering black men in history.--Sara Jurek, Children's English Library, Stuttgart, Germany


Kirkus Review

Harrison celebrated black women of note in Little Leaders (2017); here, with an assist from Johnson, she presents a companion volume of profiles from black history, this one focusing on black men.This is a book many have been waiting for, and it does not disappoint. The winning formula that endeared Little Leaders to readers is employed again here: One page of biographical text faces a full-page portrait of a young-looking figure with a serenely smiling brown face with closed eyes. The figure's clothing and the background setting design represent his field of contribution. The text begins with each leader's early life and is held together with a thread showing how the leader found an interest, learned and improved, worked hard, and made his work matter in the lives of others. Ordered chronologically, the names include well-known figures such as Frederick Douglass, Alvin Ailey, and Prince, but there are also many lesser-known names, such as historian Arturo Schomburg and astronaut Leland Melvin. Included also are international legends, such as Senegalese filmmaker Ousmane Sembne and British Ghanaian architect Sir David Adjaye. Whereas hairstyling details created an illusion of visual variation in Little Leaders, here the uniformity of the portraits' faces is more pronouncedyet this allows readers to see that a black boy can play at and ultimately grow into any one of these roles. A "Draw Your Own Little Legend" spread at the end invites readers into Harrison's creative process.Inspiring and healing as it educates, this volume belongs beside its companion on every bookshelf. (further bios, further reading, sources) (Collective biography. 7-12) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.