Cover image for Lost and found
Title:
Lost and found
ISBN:
9781470820596
Edition:
Unabridged.
Physical Description:
7 audio discs (9 hr., 4 min.) : CD audio, digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Compact discs.

Title from container.

This audiobook has been repackaged by Midwest Tape, LLC.
Reading Level:
Ages 12-17.
Genre:
Summary:
"Are you really a thief?" That's the question that has haunted fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast all his life. But he's not a thief; he just has a talent for finding things. Not a superpower, a micropower. Because what good is finding lost bicycles and hair scrunchies, especially when you return them to their owners and everyone thinks you must have stolen them in the first place? If only there were some way to use Ezekiel's micropower for good, to turn a curse into a blessing. His friend Beth thinks there must be, and so does a police detective investigating the disappearance of a little girl. When tragedy strikes, it's up to Ezekiel to use his talent to find what matters most.
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Summary

Summary

"Are you really a thief?"

That's the question that has haunted fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast all his life. But he's not a thief, he just has a talent for finding things. Not a superpower--a micropower. Because what good is finding lost bicycles and hair scrunchies, especially when you return them to their owners and everyone thinks you must have stolen them in the first place? If only there were some way to use Ezekiel's micropower for good, to turn a curse into a blessing. His friend Beth thinks there must be, and so does a police detective investigating the disappearance of a little girl. When tragedy strikes, it's up to Ezekiel to use his talent to find what matters most.

Master storyteller Orson Scott Card delivers a touching and funny, compelling and smart novel about growing up, harnessing your potential, and finding your place in the world, no matter how old you are.


Author Notes

Orson Scott Byron Walley Card, was born in 1951 and studied theater at Brigham Young University. He received his B.A. in 1975 and his M.A. in English in 1981. He wrote plays during that time, including Stone Tables (1973) and the musical, Father, Mother, Mother and Mom (1974).

A Mormon, Scott served a two-year mission in Brazil before starting work as a journalist in Utah. He also designed games at Lucas Film Games, 1989-92. He is best known for his science fiction novels, including the popular Ender series. Well known titles include A Planet Called Treason (1979), Treasure Box (1996), and Heartfire (1998). He has also written the guide called How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy (1990).

His novel Ender's Game and its sequel Speaker for the Dead, both won Hugo and Nebula awards, making Card the only author to win both prizes in consecutive years. His titles Shadows in Flight, Ruins and Ender's Game made The New York Times Best Seller List. He is also the author of The First Formic War Series, which includes the titles Earth Unaware, Earth Afire, and Earth Awakens.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

In this uneven novel by Card, a young man with the "micropower" to locate lost items must explore new applications of his abilities after the police enlist him to find a kidnapped girl. At first, Ezekiel Blast, 14, is reluctant to help; previous misunderstandings over his abilities have left him branded a thief with a healthy, even obnoxious, distrust of authority. But with the assistance of his new friend Beth, a girl with proportionate dwarfism, and a support group dedicated to those with similarly unusual powers, Ezekiel succeeds in tracking down the missing child. Then Beth is taken, and Ezekiel must find her before she suffers a terrible fate. While Card (The Hive) starts with an intriguing premise, the story devolves into ongoing commentary and extrapolation about the micropowers. In addition, many of the younger characters, especially Ezekiel and Beth, sound inauthentic and overly adult. Readers may also be disturbed by the narrative's sudden twist into poorly integrated darker material, such as the introduction of a pedophiliac pornography/snuff ring. While this story raises provocative questions about family, friendship, and the value of individual abilities, the irregular narrative tone and disjointed parts fail to cohere. Ages 12--up. (Sept.)


Kirkus Review

A teen with the micropower (much smaller than a superpower) of finding lost things is asked to help in a kidnapping investigation.Long ostracized as a thief because no one believes him, freshman Ezekiel has tried to tamp down his ability to recognize lost items and compulsion to return them. His loner act is interrupted by Beth, an almost 14-year-old sophomore with proportionate dwarfism who wants to befriend him so that his isolation bubble can protect her from the bullying she faces. He's jerkish as a defense mechanism; she's persistent; they're both precocious intellectuals with snarky, dark humormost importantly, she believes in and encourages his micropower. Also encouraging him is a desperate detective who wants Ezekiel's help in a missing child case (though Ezekiel's more accustomed to being accused and mistreated by police). The pacing of the multilayered mystery enables a buildup of dread leading to the revelation of how incredibly dark the crime story really is. The story's psychological elementsboth traumatic fallout and beautiful interpersonal relationshipsare given breathing space in a satisfying denouement. Physical and racial descriptors are largely absent, creating a white default. The slur "Paki" is used without contextualization in reference to a Bangladeshi American character. Despite the infantilizing descriptive phrase "pitter patter of little feet," Beth is portrayed as strong and capable.A winning combination of wit, a twisted crime drama, and a fresh take on teens with powers. (Thriller/science fiction. 15-adult) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.