Cover image for You asked for perfect
Title:
You asked for perfect
ISBN:
9781492658276
Physical Description:
267 pages ; 21 cm.
Summary:
Senior Ariel Stone is the perfect college applicant: first chair violin, dedicated community volunteer, and expected valedictorian. A failed Calculus quiz is not part of his plan. As his grade slips further, he enlists a classmate, Amir, as a tutor. Amir and Ariel have never gotten along, but spending time with Amir makes the world seem fuller and brighter. Except adding a new relationship to his long list of commitments may just push Ariel past his limit. --
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Summary

Summary

"WiseÂ, romanticÂ, and painfully relatable."--BECKY ALBERTALLI, award-winning author of Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda

For fans of Adam Silvera and Nina LaCour comes a timely novel about a teen?s struggle when academic success and happiness pull him in opposite directions.

Senior Ariel Stone has spent his life cultivating the perfect college résumé: firstchair violinist, dedicated volunteer, active synagogue congregant, and expected valedictorian. He barely has time to think about a social life, let alone a relationship...until a failed calculus quiz puts his future on the line, forcing Ariel to enlist his classmate, Amir, as a tutor.

As the two spend more time together, Ariel discovers he may not like calculus, but he does like Amir. When he's with Amir, the crushing academic pressure fades away, and a fuller and brighter world comes into focus. But college deadlines are still looming. And adding a new relationship to his long list of commitments may just push Ariel past his limit.

Full of empathy, honesty, and heart, You Asked for Perfectis a story for anyone who has ever questioned the price of perfection.

Praise for You Asked for Perfect:
"Silverman's novel hit me straight in the heart... It was powerful enough to make me want to be a better--yet still imperfect--person." --Bill Konigsberg, author of The Music of What Happens
"A coming-of-age novel that will charm readers with its relatable and diverse characters, quirky storyline, and interweaving of faith, queerness, and the everyday lives of seniors navigating the pressures of college applications, grades, and relationships. Heartwarming and engaging."--Kirkus


Author Notes

Laura Silverman is a writer and editor. She loves books, dogs, and bubble baths. She currently lives in Brooklyn, NY. You can follow her on Twitter @LJSilverman1.


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-At the start of senior year, Ariel is valedictorian, first chair violin, and a perfect Harvard applicant. Despite all that work, his road to the perfect future is getting bumpy. Unexpected struggles in AP calculus, bloody fingers from a new violin solo, more work and less sleep send Ariel into a spiral of panic and exhaustion. He certainly doesn't need a crush on his (secret) calculus tutor, Amir, to further complicate things. As pressure mounts and Ariel grows terrified that someone will learn of his inadequacies, he has to decide how far he'll go-and what he'll sacrifice-to be perfect. Silverman's book is a critical look at the growing academic pressures teens face and the ease with which adults overlook the well-being of high-performing kids. Ariel's struggles with high expectations and a competitive school environment (high achieving kids often trade in their lunch period for extra AP credits) are heartbreakingly relatable. His fear and embarrassment over being less than the best drive him deeper into dangerous habits and isolation. Ariel's turmoil is the undoubted heart of the novel, but his friends and family are rich, interesting characters on their own. Inclusion is celebrated on every page. Ariel is openly bisexual, his family is devoutly Jewish, his best friend is Korean, his love interest is Muslim. These things are all simply facts of the world, neither watered-down nor over-explained. VERDICT Highly recommended for teen collections, -especially in competitive school environments.-Amy Diegelman, Chicago Public Library © Copyright 2019. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Ariel has always been a straight-A student, but now it's senior year.For this overachiever, that means taking a kajillion AP courses, practicing violin, and making everyone think he's a perfectionist to whom it all comes easy. But Ariel's dream of Harvard begins to waver when he fails a calculus quiz. Thankfully, Amir comes to the rescue by agreeing to tutor him. Gay Amir is Pakistani Muslim, and bisexual Ariel comes from an observant Jewish family; the boys have been in the same school for years and their families are friendly, but it is only now that they really noticeand quickly fall forone another. With AP exams approaching, college applications due, a violin recital and numerous family events loomingnot to mention Rosh Hashanah and Yom KippurAriel begins to realize that effortless perfection requires quite a bit of effort after all. As their romance grows, Ariel finds himself unable to keep up with the various elements of his life: the stresses of school, romance, and family. Ultimately, he learns the importance of stepping back, seeking help, and admitting to weakness. Silverman (Girl Out of Water, 2017) writes a coming-of-age novel that will charm readers with its relatable and diverse characters, quirky storyline, and interweaving of faith, queerness, and the everyday lives of seniors navigating the pressures of college applications, grades, and relationships.Heartwarming and engaging. (Romance. 14-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Seventeen-year-old Ariel is smart. Like valedictorian smart. So how is it that he fails his calculus quiz? What will this mean for his class standing and his application to Harvard? Does he need a tutor? In a word, yes. Desperate, he asks hottie Amir for help and, to his surprise, Amir agrees. Oh, yes; Amir is gay and Ariel is bi. Hmm . . . Happily, with Amir's tutelage, Ariel aces his next test, and the two begin a sweet-spirited relationship. But academic woes strike again when Ariel gets a C on an English paper and his orchestra solo is deemed unsatisfactory and then there are his five other AP classes. Is his dream of Harvard turning into a nightmare? Furthermore, unremitting stress and lack of sleep compromise his memory, and he forgets an important gallery showing of Amir's photographs. Is their relationship over? Silverman's novel isn't the most original to come down the pike, and she tends to overdo the stressors, but her characters are appealing; and who can resist a heartfelt romance?--Michael Cart Copyright 2010 Booklist