Cover image for Passionate for justice : Ida B. Wells as prophet for our time
Title:
Passionate for justice : Ida B. Wells as prophet for our time
ISBN:
9781640651609
Physical Description:
x, 150 pages ; 22 cm
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Summary:
"Ida B. Wells was a powerful churchwoman and witness for justice and equity from 1878-1931. Born enslaved, her witness flowed through the struggles for justice in her lifetime, especially in the intersections of African-Americans, women, and those who were poor. Her life is a profound witness for faith-based work of visionary power, resistance, and resilience for today's world, when the forces of injustice stand in opposition to progress. These are exciting and dangerous times. Boundaries that previously seemed impenetrable are now being crossed. This book is a guide for the current state of affairs in American culture, enlivened by the historical perspective of Wells' search for justice. The authors are an African-American woman and a child of white supremacy. Both have dedicated themselves to working, writing, and developing ministries oriented towards justice, equity, and mercy. This book can be used in all settings, but most especially in churches (pastors and other church leaders, study groups), seminaries, and universities. - Reflections on current affairs through the lens of history -A resource for social justice and resilience."--
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Summary

* Reflections on current affairs through the lens of history *A resource for social justice and resilience Ida B. Wells was a powerful churchwoman and witness for justice and equity from 1878-1931. Born enslaved, her witness flowed through the struggles for justice in her lifetime, especially in the intersections of African Americans, women, and those who were poor. Her life is a profound witness for faith-based work of visionary power, resistance, and resilience for today's world, when the forces of injustice stand in opposition to progress. These are exciting and dangerous times. Boundaries that previously seemed impenetrable are now being crossed. This book is a guide for the current state of affairs in American culture, enlivened by the historical perspective of Wells' search for justice. The authors are an African-American woman and a child of white supremacy. Both have dedicated themselves to working, writing, and developing ministries oriented toward justice, equity, and mercy. This book can be used in all settings, but most especially in churches (pastors and other church leaders, study groups), seminaries, and universities.


Author Notes

Catherine Meeks, PhD, is the retired Clara Carter Acree Distinguished Professor of Socio-Cultural Studies at Wesleyan College and the Director of the Absalom Jones Center for Racial Healing. She has long been a strong advocate for social justice, community, and wellness. She is the author of several books, including Living into God's Dream.
Nibs Stroupe retired in 2017 as pastor of Oakhurst Presbyterian Church, a nationally recognized leader in multicultural and racial justice ministry. He has written numerous articles for magazines, including The Atlantic online. He has written frequently for Westminster John Knox's Feasting on the Word series, and is a frequent contributor to Journal for Preachers. He is the author of four books.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

In this hard-hitting yet heartfelt analysis, historians Meeks (Standing on Their Shoulders) and Stroupe (While We Run This Race) use Gilded Age reformer Ida B. Wells (1862--1931) as a touchstone for a discussion of 21st century racism. In the book's opening section the authors briefly rehash Wells's life; she worked as a journalist, was a tireless advocate for both black and woman's rights, and helped found the NAACP in 1909. Meeks and Stroupe argue Wells's life spans a pivotal intersection of racial and gender oppression within American history--which launches their examination of present-day white supremacy. While the biography section is idealized and rushed, the subsequent analysis is deeply moving. Meeks, a black woman, and Stroupe, a white man, tell their stories of dealing with racism. Meeks, in a dialogue with Stroupe, effectively points out the limitations in white versions of events, convincingly making the point that white Americans have largely failed to acknowledge the black experience of continuing oppression. Stroupe agrees and believes that all white Americans are born into a culture steeped in systemic, unconscious racism. The fix, Stroupe posits, is to recognize such racism, repent, partake in social justice causes, fight for reparations, and work toward reconciliation. In simple language, Meeks and Stroupe present a cogent, persuasive blueprint for achieving racial justice and equality in America. (Sept.)


Table of Contents

Forewordp. iv
An Introduction to Ida B. Wells from Her Great-Granddaughterp. vii
Prefacep. ix
1 "To the Seeker of Truth"p. 1
2 "Crusade for Justice"p. 10
3 "To Tell the Truth Freely"p. 21
4 "My Name Is Legion"p. 43
5 "At the Crossroads: Just Trying to Be Human"p. 71
8 "Order Our Steps"p. 95
7 Seeking the Beloved Communityp. 134