Cover image for 1973 : rock at the crossroads
Title:
1973 : rock at the crossroads
ISBN:
9781250299987
Edition:
1st ed.
Physical Description:
xvii, 428 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : portraits ; 25 cm.
Contents:
Introduction : Raw power and innervisions -- I. Winter. The dope's that there's still hope ; Yeah! It was time to unfreeze ; God is in the grooves ; The dark side of the moon ; No secrets ; Houses of the holy ; Now that it's over, what you gonna do? -- II. Spring. We'll help you party down ; We're coming out ; AOR, Prog, and Yacht rock ; The harder they come ; Ballerina Wolfmen -- III. Summer. Honky tonk heroes ; The once and current kings ; Goodbye to glitter ; Counterculture '73 ; Southern rock ; Keep gettin' it on ; Star-crossed in pleasure ; The world is a ghetto ; Country rock ; Papa, don't lay that s**t on me ; Troubadour underdogs -- IV. Autumn. Quadrophenia ; Standing on the sound of some open-hearted people ; Time to get down ; Underground vibrations ; Court and spark ; Headbangers apotheosis ; If we make it through December ; I hope you're having fun ; Bob Marley ; Goodbye yellow brick road -- Epilogue : Keep on truckin'.
Summary:
A fascinating account of the music and epic social change of 1973, a defining year for David Bowie, Bruce Springsteen, Pink Floyd, Elton John, the Rolling Stones, Eagles, Elvis Presley, and the former members of The Beatles. 1973 was the year rock hit its peak while splintering-just like the rest of the world. Ziggy Stardust travelled to America in David Bowie's Aladdin Sane. The Dark Side of the Moon began its epic run on the Billboard charts, inspired by the madness of Pink Floyd's founder, while all four former Beatles scored top ten albums, two hitting #1. FM battled AM, and Motown battled Philly on the charts, as the era of protest soul gave way to disco, while DJ Kool Herc gave birth to hip hop in the Bronx. The glam rock of the New York Dolls and Alice Cooper split into glam metal and punk. Hippies and rednecks made peace in Austin thanks to Willie Nelson, while outlaw country, country rock, and Southern rock each pointed toward modern country. The Allman Brothers, Grateful Dead, and the Band played the largest rock concert to date at Watkins Glen. Led Zep's Houses of the Holy reflected the rise of funk and reggae. The singer songwriter movement led by Bob Dylan, Neil Young, and Joni Mitchell flourished at the Troubadour and Max's Kansas City, where Bruce Springsteen and Bob Marley shared bill. Elvis Presley's Aloha from Hawaii via Satellite was NBC's top-rated special of the year, while Elton John's albums dominated the number one spot for two and a half months. Just as U.S. involvement in Vietnam drew to a close, Roe v. Wade ignited a new phase in the culture war. While the oil crisis imploded the American dream of endless prosperity, and Watergate's walls closed in on Nixon, the music of 1973 both reflected a shattered world and brought us together. --
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Summary

Summary

A fascinating account of the music and epic social change of 1973, a defining year for David Bowie, Bruce Springsteen, Pink Floyd, Elton John, the Rolling Stones, Eagles, Elvis Presley, and the former members of The Beatles.

1973 was the year rock hit its peak while splintering--just like the rest of the world. Ziggy Stardust travelled to America in David Bowie's Aladdin Sane. The Dark Side of the Moon began its epic run on the Billboard charts, inspired by the madness of Pink Floyd's founder, while all four former Beatles scored top ten albums, two hitting #1.

FM battled AM, and Motown battled Philly on the charts, as the era of protest soul gave way to disco, while DJ Kool Herc gave birth to hip hop in the Bronx. The glam rock of the New York Dolls and Alice Cooper split into glam metal and punk. Hippies and rednecks made peace in Austin thanks to Willie Nelson, while outlaw country, country rock, and Southern rock each pointed toward modern country. The Allman Brothers, Grateful Dead, and the Band played the largest rock concert to date at Watkins Glen.

Led Zep's Houses of the Holy reflected the rise of funk and reggae. The singer songwriter movement led by Bob Dylan, Neil Young, and Joni Mitchell flourished at the Troubadour and Max's Kansas City, where Bruce Springsteen and Bob Marley shared bill. Elvis Presley's Aloha from Hawaii via Satellite was NBC's top-rated special of the year, while Elton John's albums dominated the number one spot for two and a half months.

Just as U.S. involvement in Vietnam drew to a close, Roe v. Wade ignited a new phase in the culture war. While the oil crisis imploded the American dream of endless prosperity, and Watergate's walls closed in on Nixon, the music of 1973 both reflected a shattered world and brought us together.


Author Notes

ANDREW GRANT JACKSON is the author of Still the Greatest: The Essential Songs of the Beatles' Solo Careers, Where's Ringo? and Where's Elvis? He has written for Rolling Stone, Slate, Yahoo!, and PopMatters . He directed and co-wrote the feature film The Discontents starring Perry King and Amy Madigan . He lives in Los Angeles.


Reviews 3

Kirkus Review

An astute observer of popular culture takes a granular look at 12 months of music that reflected "the aftermath" of the preceding cultural revolution.In a natural follow-up to 1965: The Most Revolutionary Year in Music (2015), Los Angeles-based music writer Jackson examines another pivotal year in popular music, when radio programmers figured out how to commodify " album-oriented rock'[which] soon segregated rock from other genres that once spurred its evolution." There's all sorts of intriguing cross-pollination going on in the author's rollicking retrospective of 1973, a year that some may consider unexceptional. However, Jackson's expansive exploration obliterates such notions. On one hand, 1973 was a remarkable year for celebrated acts to produce some of their most seminal works, including Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon, Led Zeppelin's Houses of the Holy, Elton John's Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, The Who's Quadrophenia, and Alice Cooper's Billion Dollar Babies. On the other hand, 1973 was also an exceedingly fertile time for exciting new artists to burst on to the sceneBruce Springsteen with Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J.and for others to break away from the confines of their home countries and garner a more global audience (Bob Marley's Catch a Fire). The title aside, Jackson demonstrates a determination to be musically inclusive. "Fifteen of the year's nineteen No. 1 albums were rock albums," writes the author. "In 2018, only eight out of the forty-one No. 1 albums were rock." Though Jackson dives deep into AOR radio, he makes it clear that 1973 was also about outlaws Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings upending the country music scene; superstars Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye revolutionizing the Motown sound; Linda Ronstadt and Joni Mitchell defying genre norms; and much more. As the year turned over, the top song in the country was Jim Croce's "Time in a Bottle." A month-by-month selected timeline helps readers situate the events discussed in the book.Consistently surprising and richly entertaining. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Jackson has been part of a trend, biographies of particular years in music history. He follows 1965: The Most Revolutionary Year in Music (2015) with this in-depth examination of 1973, the defining year for such artists as David Bowie, Bob Dylan, Elvis Presley, Bruce Springsteen, Elton John, and the former Beatles. Jackson tags 1973 the zenith of classic rock, which also marks the arrivals of punk, disco, and hip hop and the rise of funk and reggae. Jackson divides the year into the four seasons, discussing the singles and albums that were released during the 12-month period in chapters each devoted to a particular artist, album, genre, or trend. The spectrum is full, from Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon to Led Zeppelin's Houses of the Holy, Jimmy Cliff's The Harder They Come (film and soundtrack), the outlaw country albums of Kris Kristofferson, Willie Nelson, and Waylon Jennings, on to southern rock, progressive rock, and the Rolling Stones. This all adds up to a many-versed love song to classic rock.--June Sawyers Copyright 2019 Booklist


Library Journal Review

Jackson (1965) argues that 1973 was a transitional yet cornerstone year for rock music, as the once almost monolithic world of rock and pop started to split into multiple subgenres and styles, leading to the eventual erosion of its singular influence in music. The year produced classics, including Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon and Elton John's Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, key albums from all four former Beatles, debuts from Bruce Springsteen and Aerosmith, and landmark work from David Bowie and Stevie Wonder. Examining the first big stateside impact of reggae with Bob Marley and the soundtrack to The Harder They Come, the peak of glam rock, the rise of outlaw country, and the beginnings of punk and disco, the book surveys 1973's diverse musical landscape. This lively, detailed narrative provides a backdrop of historical changes that were also roiling the world as the Seventies hit their stride. VERDICT Deeply sourced and entertainingly informative, Jackson's chronology of a transformative year in music, culture, and society may prompt debate (as well as playlist creation) and will appeal to a wide swath of readers.--James Collins, Morristown-Morris Twp. P.L., NJ


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. ix
1973 Selected Time Linep. xi
Introduction: Raw Power and Innervisionsp. 1
I Winter
1 The Dope's That There's Still Hopep. 13
2 Yeah! It Was Time to Unfreezep. 23
3 God Is in the Groovesp. 36
4 The Dark Side of the Moonp. 47
5 No Secretsp. 55
6 Houses of the Holyp. 64
7 Now That It's Over, What You Gonna Do?p. 70
II Spring
8 We'll Help You Party Downp. 81
9 We're Coming Outp. 90
10 AOR, Prog, and Yacht Rockp. 99
11 The Harder They Comep. 109
12 Ballerina Wolfmenp. 116
III Summer
13 Honky Tonk Heroesp. 129
14 The Once and Current Kingsp. 138
15 Goodbye to Glitterp. 150
16 Counterculture 73p. 162
17 Southern Rockp. 176
18 Keep Gettin' It Onp. 186
19 Star-Crossed in Pleasurep. 192
20 The World Is a Ghettop. 201
21 Country Rockp. 211
22 Papa, Don't Lay That S**t on Mep. 221
23 Troubadour Underdogsp. 229
IV Autumn
24 Quadropheniap. 241
25 Standing on the Sound of Some Open-Hearted Peoplep. 250
26 Time to Get Downp. 260
27 Underground Vibrationsp. 270
28 Court and Sparkp. 279
29 Headbangers Apotheosisp. 288
30 If We Make It Through Decemberp. 296
31 I Hope You're Having Funp. 315
32 Bob Marleyp. 324
33 Goodbye Yellow Brick Roadp. 333
Epilogue: Keep On Truckin'p. 340
Notesp. 349
Bibliographyp. 397
Indexp. 419