Cover image for My monster friends and me : a big kid's guide to things that go bump in the night
Title:
My monster friends and me : a big kid's guide to things that go bump in the night
ISBN:
9781492693673
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm.
Added Author:
Summary:
A young boy introduces readers to the monsters he once feared, but, through the power of imagination, he now knows are friendly.
Holds:

Available:*

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Summary

Summary

A story to help kids overcome their fears, because sometimes it's more than just the monster under the bed

"This is a great way to start talking to young children about their fears and the monsters they become in their imaginations." --Kirkus Reviews

From noisy dogs behind gates to thunderous storms that seem scarier than they are, this clever story encourages children to take control of their fears, grown monstrous in their imaginations. By giving them names and turning fears into friends, My Monster Friends and Me guides children into healthier mindsets on how to deal with their worries and anxiety, issues all kids face.

When I was young, I had many fears,
Like darkness or storms in the sky.
But then I learned when you meet your monsters,
You can make them friends if you try!


Author Notes

Annie Sarac is a fiction editor, author, and playwright. Annie loves all things Scotland and cookies. Her all-time favorite gig is being a mom to a lovely and talented daughter. You can find Annie running off the cookies or at her tidy desk at TheEditingPen.com.

Alice Brereton grew up in Minneapolis, MN, and is absurdly proud of it. Her artwork is colorful, textured, shape oriented, and always strives to be quirky or "smile inducing." Her favorite food is "pickled anything," and if she were not an illustrator, Alice would be at the bottom of the sea in a submarine, discovering new kinds of sea life and naming them ridiculous names.


Reviews 1

Kirkus Review

A child invites readers to uncover common childhood fears and describes how to transform monsters to friends.An 8-year-old kid shares experiences with monsters and fearsand the secret to handling them: Naming each monster makes the fear go away. The first sharp-toothed monster lives on the other side of a picket fence. It turns out the first monster's name is Kate and is actually a sweet dog. The protagonist continues through the house addressing other monsters, or common childhood fears, including shadows, the dark, thunder and lightning, and, of course, the monster under the bed. Each fear is first illustrated and described with its own dark, frightening monster personality, but with a flip of the page it is transformed into a bright, cheery version of what it really is. This is a great way to start talking to young children about their fears and the monsters they become in their imaginations. In rhyming verse, Sarac encourages children to take control of their fears by giving them names and reimagining them as friends, not foes. Some of the verses do not flow smoothly, but they still get the message across. The illustrations combine bold colors, geometrical shapes, and lots of textures and patterns that really emphasize the darkness of fearsand the light of reimagining them. The bespectacled protagonist has pale skin and wavy black hair.A solid choice to address fears. (Picture book. 4-7) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.