Cover image for Yes no maybe so
Title:
Yes no maybe so
ISBN:
9780062937049

9780062983794
Edition:
1st ed.
Physical Description:
436 pages ; 22 cm.
Added Author:
Summary:
Jamie Goldberg is cool with volunteering for his local state senate candidate?as long as he?s behind the scenes. When it comes to speaking to strangers (or, let?s face it, speaking at all to almost anyone), Jamie?s a choke artist. There?s no way he?d ever knock on doors to ask people for their votes?until he meets Maya. Maya Rehman?s having the worst Ramadan ever. Her best friend is too busy to hang out, her summer trip is canceled, and now her parents are separating. Why her mother thinks the solution to her problems is political canvassing?with some awkward dude she hardly knows?is beyond her. Going door to door isn?t exactly glamorous, but maybe it?s not the worst thing in the world. After all, the polls are getting closer?and so are Maya and Jamie. Mastering local activism is one thing. Navigating the cross-cultural romance of the century is another thing entirely.
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Summary

Summary

A book about the power of love and resistance from New York Times bestselling authors Becky Albertalli and Aisha Saeed.

YES

Jamie Goldberg is cool with volunteering for his local state senate candidate--as long as he's behind the scenes. When it comes to speaking to strangers (or, let's face it, speaking at all to almost anyone) Jamie's a choke artist. There's no way he'd ever knock on doors to ask people for their votes...until he meets Maya.

NO

Maya Rehman's having the worst Ramadan ever. Her best friend is too busy to hang out, her summer trip is canceled, and now her parents are separating. Why her mother thinks the solution to her problems is political canvassing--with some awkward dude she hardly knows--is beyond her.

MAYBE SO

Going door to door isn't exactly glamorous, but maybe it's not the worst thing in the world. After all, the polls are getting closer--and so are Maya and Jamie. Mastering local activism is one thing. Navigating the cross-cultural crush of the century is another thing entirely.


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up--Even though they're not old enough to vote in the upcoming state special election, 17-year-olds Jamie and Maya find themselves roped into canvassing for a progressive candidate in an effort to flip a historically conservative voting district. Jamie sees himself both as a passionate activist and a completely hopeless, clumsy mess. When he's asked to deliver the toast at his sister's bat mitzvah and go door-to-door to talk to likely voters, he's convinced he'll do or say something that will make him a laughingstock. Maya is having a terrible summer--her best friend is moving to college and her parents announced their trial separation at the beginning of Ramadan. When the local political candidate holds a campaign event at her mosque, her mother encourages her to volunteer as a way of filling her time. Although they'd been close as children, Jamie and Maya's relationship has been dormant for several years, but begins to bloom slowly into something beautiful, multilayered, and complex. While this scenario hardly sounds like the setup for a compelling novel, Albertalli and Saeed unfold a story told in alternating chapters that weaves together timely, relevant, and engaging themes. VERDICT With topical references to state and national issues--including hijab bans, bathroom bills, and the subtle politics of meme culture--this is a warm, beautiful story about relationships' beginnings, endings, and transitions; what it means to fight the good fight; and the transformative power of local activism. A solid addition to any contemporary YA collection.--Erin Downey, Boise School District, ID


Publisher's Weekly Review

Once childhood friends, deeply shy Jamie Goldberg, who is Jewish and white, and stability-loving Maya Rehman, who is Pakistani-American and Muslim, reconnect when pressured into working on the campaign of a progressive Senate hopeful. At 17, both are reluctant to dedicate their summers to canvassing in the Atlanta heat; this is especially so for Maya, whose best friend is college-bound at summer's end, but her need to escape the constant reminders of her parents' separation compels her to team up with Jamie to inform and persuade local voters. Soon, swept up in the passions and pressures leading to Election Day, the pair starts falling for each other, though Maya doesn't date. They also learn firsthand that the political is personal when a proposed bill calls for "a partial ban on head and facial coverings while participating in certain public activities." Albertalli and Saeed's collaborative authorship is seamlessly achieved via alternating first-person narratives that offer a nuanced lens on the current U.S. political climate and individuals' roles in democracy. With a convincing, relevant message about democratic responsibility, studded with references to activists, the authors offer an honest handling of cultural misunderstandings, microaggressions, and open communication via Jamie and Maya's tight-knit families and developing relationship. Ages 14--up. (Feb.)■


Horn Book Review

In alternating chapters, teens Maya (a Muslim girl) and Jamie (a Jewish boy) narrate a story set amidst a longshot Georgia state senate campaign. Pushed by their politically progressive moms into canvassing together, they continue the work longer than expectedmostly because they believe in the cause (their candidates opponent supports a bill that would restrict head and facial coverings, and though Maya doesnt wear hijab, her mother does)but also because they enjoy each others company. Jamies cousin, whos the candidates assistant campaign manager, complicates matters with his eagerness to exploit anything that might make the campaign go viral, including the pairs awkwardly burgeoning romance and the vandalism of Jamies car with a white-supremacy sticker. Albertalli and Saeed work the above concerns naturally into a mostly light rom-com, along with elements of both characters religions: Jamies family is in prep mode for his sisters bat mitzvah, while Maya fasts for Ramadan for much of the book and struggles with her parents reservations about her dating, either outside the faith or at all until shes older. Though the ending is hopeful, the novel leaves much unresolved, allowing its characters and their emotions to stay complicated. Shoshana Flax January/February 2020 p.85(c) Copyright 2020. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Two 17-year-olds from the northern suburbs of Atlanta, Georgia, work together on a campaign for a progressive state senate candidate in an unlikely love story.Co-authors Albertalli (Leah on the Offbeat, 2018, etc.) and Saeed (Bilal Cooks Daal, 2019, etc.) present Jamie Goldberg, a white Ashkenazi Jewish boy who suffers from being "painfully bad at anything girl-related," and Maya Rehman, a Pakistani American Muslim girl struggling with her parents' sudden separation. Former childhood best friends, they find themselves volunteered as a team by their mothers during a Ramadan "campaign iftar." One canvassing adventure at a time, they grow closer despite Maya's no-dating policy. Chapters alternate between Maya's and Jamie's first-person voices. The endearing, if somewhat clichd, teens sweetly connect over similarities like divorced parents, and their activism will resonate with many. Jamie is sensitive, clumsy, and insecure; Maya is determined, sassy, a dash spoiled, and she swears freely. The novel covers timeless themes of teen activism and love-conquers-all along with election highs and lows, messy divorces, teen angst, bat mitzvah stress, social media gaffes, right-wing haters, friendship drama, and cultural misunderstandings, but the explicit advocacy at times interferes with an immersive reading experience and the text often feels repetitious. Maya's mother is hijabi, and while Maya advocates against a hijab ban, she chooses not to wear hijab and actively wrestles with what it means to be an observant Muslim.Best leave it at maybe so. (Romance. 14-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.