Cover image for Happy hair
Title:
Happy hair
ISBN:
9781984895547

9781984895554
Edition:
1st ed.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm.
General Note:
Originally self-published in slightly different form in 2014.

Companion to: Cool cuts.
Summary:
A visual and rhyming celebration of African-American girls' hair. --
Holds:

Available:*

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On Order

Summary

Summary

African American girls and their beautiful hair are celebrated in this bright, joyful read-together picture book that will have girls everywhere repeating the book's chorus- "I love being me!"

Full 'fro, cute bow! I love being me! Smart girl, cool curls! I love being me!

African American girls will love seeing strong, happy reflections of themselves in this vibrant, rhythmic picture book celebrating the diversity of beautiful black hair. From a cute crop to pom-pom puffs, adorable illustrations of girls with gorgeous braids, blowouts, and bantus grace each page, side by side with a call-and-response affirmation that will make girls cheer. It's a great read-aloud to promote self-esteem for girls of all ages, building and growing the foundation of self-love (and hair love!) and letting every girl know "You are made beautiful!"

And look for Cool Cuts --a hip hair book for boys!--coming in February 2020!


Author Notes

MECHAL RENEE ROE is a #1 New York Times bestselling illustrator (for Superheroes Are Everywhere by Senator Kamala Harris) and a designer, writer, photographer, and entrepreneur. She originally self-published Happy Hair, born out of her love of natural hair and embracing your own unique beauty. Learn more about Mechal's Happy Hair brand at happyhairshop.com, and join her many Instagram followers at @happyhairgirls.


Reviews 1

Kirkus Review

A book that pays homage to the versatility of black hair.A dark-skinned black girl, eyes closed, face forward, greets readers on the cover against a bright yellow background, and she wears a pink bow (die-cut out of the case) in her wavy updo. This is one of many hairstyles featured in the illustrations, designed to help readers appreciate the potential for styling natural Afro hair. "Bomb braids," "pom-pom puffs" and "fro-hawk" (an Afro-styled mohawk) also appear. Like these, most of the hairstyle names incorporate alliteration, making them fun to read aloud. At first glance, readers might think this book is about one girl's hairwhich is possible, given how many styles one head of afrotextured hair can sportbut skin color changes, as do clothes, earrings, and other details that are easily altered, although every girl holds the same face-front, eye-closed position. But the sameness of each face leaves no room for variations in other features such as the eyes, lips, and nose. Hence, young readers might consider this a paper version of the video games that allow changes in hairstyles on a face that has limited or no customizabilitywhich also limits the book's usefulness as multicultural literature.The refrain, "I love being me," offers a worthwhile affirmation, but cookie-cutter faces undermine the message about diversity. (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.