Cover image for I voted : making a choice makes a difference
Title:
I voted : making a choice makes a difference
ISBN:
9780823445615
Edition:
1st ed.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unnumbered pages) : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
Added Author:
Summary:
...explains the concept of choosing, individually, and as a group, from making a simple choice: "Which do you like better, apples or oranges?", to selecting a class pet, to even more complicated decisions, like electing community representatives. --
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Material Type
Call Number
Item Available
Copies
Status
Searching...
Book J 324.6 SHU 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book J 324.6 SHU 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book J 324.6 SHU 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book J 324.6 SHU 0 1
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

With the next presidential election upon us, this witty, nonpartisan book will help explain the concept of voting to the youngest readers.

I Voted explains the concept of choosing, individually, and as a group, from making a simple choice: "Which do you like better, apples or oranges?", to selecting a class pet, to even more complicated decisions, like electing community representatives.

You may not always get want you want, but there are strategies to better your odds!

Serge Bloch's effortless and charming illustrations paired with Mark Shulman's funny and timely text create a perfect resource for discussing current events with your children.

Backmatter includes information about the United States electoral process.

Selected for the CBC Champions of Change Showcase
A Junior Library Guild Selection!


Author Notes

Mark Shulman has authored over 150 books, including the picture book Mom and Dad are Palindromes . His debut novel Scrawl was an ALA/YALSA pick for Best Fiction for Young Adults title. Shulman lives in New York City.

Serge Bloch is a society of Illustrators Gold Medal winner and the recipient of France's Baobab Award. He illustrated Susie Morgenstern's A Book of Coupons, named an ALA Batchelder Honor Book, and has written and illustrated numerous books for children and young adults including One Proud Penny written by Randy Siegel. He lives in Paris.


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Gr 1--3--This delightful picture book introduces young readers to the process of voting. Readers learn that voters must gather information, have conversations with people who hold opposing views, and collaborate with others who want the same outcome. But win or lose, it's important to take an active part. Shulman's text compares voting for local, state, and national officials to more kid-friendly examples such as choosing an ice cream flavor or deciding on the class pet. Young voters are instructed to "Listen. Read. Talk. Ask. And tell someone who's old enough…to bring you along on Election Day." Bloch's cheerful red, white, and blue illustrations pair perfectly with the text, producing a joyful, engaging book that encourages responsible citizenship. Back matter makes these concepts even more concrete. Specific examples of how all three branches of government work are featured. Shulman reminds readers that civic engagement starts well before the age of 18. VERDICT Purchase for classroom and library collections to encourage the next generation of decision makers.--Jen McConnel, Queen's University, Ont.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Bloch's balletic ink line--punctuated with color washes and textural elements in red, white, and blue--and Shulman's crisp prose means there'll be no sleeping through this civics class. Beginning with simple personal choices ("Markers or crayons?") and then a communal decision (deciding on a class pet) the creators explain the mechanics of voting and how to work for a specific result: "You can talk to people who want something different./ Maybe you will change their mind./ Maybe they will change yours." The editorial cartooning consistently strikes a fine balance between gravitas and fancy: to show why voting matters, Bloch offers up two enticing doorways, one that reads "FREE FOR KIDS" and one that scans "NO KIDS ALLOWED!" Enjoining readers to engage in grown-ups' elections ("Listen. Read. Talk. Ask"), the text concludes with an overview of government branches. A simple volume with a vital message: "If you don't vote, you don't get to choose." Ages 4--8. (Jan.)


Kirkus Review

The hows, whys, and wherefores of voting are presented in this picture book.Beginning with the concept of choice and using a vote for a class pet as the initial example, this story takes readers by their hands and leads them through the entire electoral process for something. In addition to presenting the actual activity of the vote, the story stresses the ramifications of voting (or not voting) as well as the idea of engaging others in discussion. Special emphasis is placed on the concept of acquiring knowledge in order to become an informed voter. While the target audience is too young to vote in town, state, or national legislative elections, the story hands young readers power by telling them they can make sure those who can vote, do. The meat-and-potatoes text is forthright and unadorned, and the illustrations rarely vary from their two-vignettes-per-page format. Nonetheless, by its very simplicity, the gravity of the message is underscoredvoting equals choice; choice equals quality of life. Bloch's illustrations, dominated by people delineated in sketchy black outlines filled with simple patterns or color shades, emphasize expressions rendered in a cartoon style, and this adds a needed bit of levity to it all. A range of skin shades from beige to brown is shown. Extensive backmatter includes a thorough section on "How Our Government Works" as well as steps to take to vote.Comprehensive and forthright. (backmatter, bibliography, online resources) (Picture book. 5-8) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.