Cover image for Where Lily isn't
Title:
Where Lily isn't
ISBN:
9781250184252
Edition:
1st ed.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : chiefly color illustrations ; 29 cm.
Summary:
Lily ran and jumped and barked and whimpered and growled and wiggled and wagged and licked and snuggled. But not now. It is hard to lose a pet. There is sadness, but also hope--for a beloved pet lives on in your heart, your memory, and your imagination. --
Holds:

Available:*

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Book PICTURE BOOK PAS 0 1
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Book XX(480261.2) 0 1
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Where Lily Isn't is Julie Paschkis and Margaret Chodos-Irvine's beautiful bereavement picture book celebrating the love of a lost pet.

Lily ran and jumped and barked and whimpered and growled and wiggled and wagged and licked and snuggled.

But not now.

It is hard to lose a pet. There is sadness, but also hope--for a beloved pet lives on in your heart, your memory, and your imagination.


Author Notes

Julie Paschkis is the author and illustrator of Vivid: Poems & Notes about Color and Flutter & Hum . She is a painter and an award-winning illustrator of many books for children, including Pablo Neruda: Poet of the People and Glass Slipper, Gold Sandal: A Worldwide Cinderella . She lives in Seattle, Washington.

Margaret Chodos-Irvine uses a variety of printmaking and painting techniques to create innovative patterns, vibrant colors, and uniquely textured imagery in her work. She has illustrated many books for children, including Caldecott Honor book Ella Sarah Gets Dressed , which she also wrote. Margaret lives in Seattle, Washington.


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2--This book addresses the loss of a pet with great sensitivity and tenderness. Lily, a dog, has died, and the child who loved her notices all the spaces that are empty now that she is gone: the lonely park, the quiet in all the rooms of the house, and the empty rug next to her bed. The girl realizes that when she draws, it is Lily that she draws over and over again. In fact, Lily still exists in her memory and in her heart. Chodos-Irvine does a remarkable job with the art. She draws what is not there in such a way that readers sense Lily on every page. VERDICT This book is beautifully written and illustrated, and answers a real need that children have. Paschkis offers children hope as she moves Lily firmly into the memory and heart of our young child. A tender addition for most libraries.--Joan Kindig, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA


Publisher's Weekly Review

Remembering Lily, a little brown pup who once "ran/ and jumped/ and barked/... But not now," a child moves through her routine noticing the dog's sudden absence. The empty rug "where Lily isn't," the gap beside a breakfast chair, the lack of havoc at the mailman's arrival. Paschkis expresses the child's grief with quiet melancholy ("There is no belly to/ be rubbed or ears/ to be scratched"), while Chodos-Irvine's colorful artwork, rendered using hand-cut stencils and gouache, emphasizes Lily's presence and absence both, showing the distinct space that Lily once took up, physically and otherwise. Expert brushwork adds movement and texture to the neat, sparse pages. A straightforward story about grieving--and coming to terms with--the passing of a beloved pet. Ages 4--8. (Jan.)


Kirkus Review

A small child describes all the aspects of life that are now changed due to the loss of beloved dog Lily.The unnamed child narrates the story, beginning with a motion-filled spread detailing all the fun, active ways that the small, brown dog liked to play. The narrative shifts, and now Lily is gone, though readers don't learn the details of Lily's demise. The child continues the story with spare sentences describing Lily's different actions, using the repeated structure of what Lily isn't doing. Lily isn't there on her braided rug or waiting for food to fall from the breakfast table or sitting by the door when the narrator returns from school. Every description of what Lily isn't there to do communicates the child's sadness and longing for Lily while also conveying a quiet acceptance and respect for memories of her pet. An understated but powerful conclusion shows the narrator drawing pictures of Lily, with a sweet, unforgettable ending emphasizing that the dog will always be in the child's heart. Restrained illustrations stand out with a large trim size and plenty of white space that conveys a subtle sense of emptiness and loss. Both narrator and mother present white; humans in the background include people of color.Touching and comforting. (Picture book. 3-8) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.