Cover image for Red hood
Title:
Red hood
ISBN:
9780062742353
Edition:
1st ed.
Physical Description:
353 pages ; 22 cm.
Geographic Term:
Summary:
You are alone in the woods, seen only by the unblinking yellow moon. Your hands are empty. You are nearly naked. And the wolf is angry. Since her grandmother became her caretaker when she was four years old, Bisou Martel has lived a quiet life in a little house in Seattle. She's kept mostly to herself. She's been good. But then comes the night of homecoming, when she finds herself running for her life over roots and between trees, a fury of claws and teeth behind her. A wolf attacks. Bisou fights back. A new moon rises. And with it, questions. About the blood in Bisou's past, and on her hands as she stumbles home. About broken boys and vicious wolves. About girls lost in the woods--frightened, but not alone.
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Summary

Summary

Elana K. Arnold, author of the Printz Honor book Damsel, returns with a dark, engrossing, blood-drenched tale of the familiar threats to female power--and one girl's journey to regain it.

You are alone in the woods, seen only by the unblinking yellow moon. Your hands are empty. You are nearly naked. And the wolf is angry.

Since her grandmother became her caretaker when she was four years old, Bisou Martel has lived a quiet life in a little house in Seattle. She's kept mostly to herself. She's been good.

But then comes the night of homecoming, when she finds herself running for her life over roots and between trees, a fury of claws and teeth behind her.

A wolf attacks. Bisou fights back. A new moon rises. And with it, questions.

About the blood in Bisou's past, and on her hands as she stumbles home.

About broken boys and vicious wolves.

About girls lost in the woods--frightened, but not alone.


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up--Since Mémé took over guardianship from her Mama 12 years ago, Bisou Martel has lived a relatively normal life in Washington State. However, as new moon rises and junior year homecoming arrives, everything changes. Bisou finds herself running through the woods with a bloodthirsty wolf at her heels. The struggle that ensues ends with Bisou walking away victorious and full of questions. Her quest for answers unleashes truths about Mémé, Mama, and other women in her supposedly quiet town, leading Bisou to reclaim her tenacity while safeguarding those she holds dear. It's unsettling how seamlessly Arnold incorporates dark fantasy elements of beastly wolves and cunning hunters into her all-too-realistic tale. Broken into three parts, the narration moves between second- and first-person, with a sprinkle of poetry, all of which perfectly fleshes out Bisou, Mémé, and Mama's histories. This dynamic mix of narration beautifully enriches the mirrored hopes, fears, and overwhelming love that drives each woman. As Bisou draws closer to the women in her life, she begins to grasp the toxic culture that permeates her modern world, a lethal society where many have silently sacrificed a part of themselves because of fear, shame, or doubt. With an author's note at the start, be aware that a few scenes dive into intimate, often uncomfortable moments. VERDICT A fantastic novel in the #MeToo era, empowering women to share their stories by reaching out, speaking up, and demanding a change.--Emily Walker, Lisle Library District, IL


Publisher's Weekly Review

There isn't always a wolf... but there is always the threat of one." Arnold artfully spins a dark, magic-tinged "Little Red Riding Hood" retelling in which a young woman discovers the power that is her birthright. Bisou Martel, 16, has lived with her grandmother, Mémé, since her mother's brutal murder when Bisou was only four. Attacked in the forest by a vicious wolf after the homecoming dance--the night she first gets her period--Bisou must slay her pursuer or succumb to its murderous intent. The next day, a boy who behaved forcefully with Bisou at the dance is found naked in the woods, dead from the same wounds as the wolf that Bisou killed. When a classmate, Keisha, is attacked by another wolf, and another faces bullying by a likely incel, Bisou's family's past and her grandmother's closely guarded secrets come to the fore. Arnold (Damsel) effectively employs a second-person narrative ("You were ready--lipstick on, hairpins in") that evokes a sense of immediacy, blurring the gap between reader and character. Though Arnold never shies from discomfort, depictions of positive male-female relationships and sexual interactions--which clearly illustrate healthy, joyful, consensual experiences-- juxtapose the trauma and pain of nonconsensual acts. At once a sharp critique of male entitlement and a celebration of sisterhood and feminine power, this story will linger with readers long after the final page. Ages 14--up. (Feb.)


Kirkus Review

Sixteen-year-old Bisou Martel's life takes a profound turn after encountering an aggressive wolf.Following an embarrassing incident between Bisou and her boyfriend, James, after the homecoming dance, a humiliated Bisou runs into the Pacific Northwest woods. There, she kills a giant wolf who viciously attacks her, upending the quiet life she's lived with her Mm, a poet, since her mother's violent death. The next day it's revealed that her classmate Tucker who drunkenly came on to her at the dancewas found dead in the woods with wounds identical to the ones Bisou inflicted on the wolf. When she rescues Keisha, an outspoken journalist for the school paper, from a similar wolf attack, Bisou gains an ally, and her Mm reveals her bloody and brave legacy, which is inextricably tied to the moon and her menstrual cycle. Bisou needs her new powers in the coming days, as more wolves lie in wait. Arnold (Damsel, 2018, etc.) uses an intriguing blend of magic realism, lyrical prose, and imagery that evokes intimate physical and emotional aspects of young womanhood. Bisou's loving relationship with gentle, kind James contrasts with the frank exploration of male entitlement and the disturbing incel phenomenon. Bisou and Mm seem to be white, Keisha is cued as black, James has light-brown skin and black eyes, and there is diversity in the supporting cast.A timely and unabashedly feminist twist on a classic fairy tale. (Fantasy. 14-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

In the wake of her Printz Honor-winning Damsel (2018), Arnold blazes a new and equally powerful trail through toxic masculinity by way of a fairy tale. This time it's the mythology of ""Little Red Riding Hood"" that pulsates through the narrative, setting primal instincts loose in modern times, where wolves wear the clothes of men and the faces of teen boys. The mortifying arrival of Bisou's first period sends her running from her boyfriend and the homecoming dance into the nearby woods, where she quickly senses she is being stalked. Her lupine pursuer attacks with a single-mindedness that leaves Bisou no choice but to fight back, and she finds her unusually heightened senses assure her victory the body of the dead wolf morphing, bewilderingly, into the naked form of a male classmate. Eventually, Bisou confides in her grandmother, with whom she lives, who reveals their lot as hunters of the wolves who would force themselves on women. This alone would make for an enthralling story, but Arnold ekes out the grandmother's history and the circumstances of Bisou's mother's death in tantalizing increments, while also spinning an emotionally complex high-school drama. It is a book of blood, where menstruation empowers, predators bleed out, sisterhood is forged, and genetics bestow unasked for responsibilities. So read, shed your pelt, and be transformed for blades are being sharpened.--Julia Smith Copyright 2019 Booklist