Cover image for Changing the equation : 50+ US Black women in STEM
Title:
Changing the equation : 50+ US Black women in STEM
ISBN:
9781419707346
Physical Description:
202 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 22 cm
Contents:
Rebecca Davis Lee Crumpler -- Rebecca J. Cole -- Halle Tanner Dillon Johnson -- Eliza Anna Grier -- Mary Eliza Mahoney -- Sarah E. Goode -- Josephine Silone Yates -- Ida Gray Nelson Rollins -- Alice Augusta Ball -- Anna Louise James -- Willa Beatrice Brown -- Ruth Ella Moore -- Martha Euphemia Lofton Haynes -- Alfreda Johnson Webb -- Jane Hinton -- Georgia Louise Harris Brown -- Angie Lena Turner King -- Myra Adele Logan -- Flemmie Kittrell -- Carolyn Beatrice Parker -- Marie Maynard Daly -- Jane Cooke Wright -- Annie Easley -- Yvonne Young Clark -- Angella Dorothea Ferguson -- Jessie Isabelle Price -- Bessie Blount -- Georgia Mae Dunston -- Joan Murrell Owens -- June Bacon-Bercey -- Patricia Suzanne Cowings -- Mamie Parker -- Shirley Ann Jackson -- Patricia E. Bath -- Donna Auguste -- Pamela McCauley -- Treena Livingston Arinzeh -- Ayanna Howard -- Paula T. Hammond -- Ashanti Johnson -- Yasmin Hurd -- Phyllis A. Dennery -- Lisa D. White -- Emma Garrison-Alexander -- Kimberly Bryant -- Aprille Joy Ericsson -- Lisette Titre-Montgomery -- Latanya Sweeney -- Patrice Banks -- Aomawa Shields.
Genre:
Summary:
"Award-winning author Tonya Bolden explores the black women who have changed the world of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) in America. Including groundbreaking computer scientists, doctors, inventors, physicists, pharmacists, mathematicians, aviators, and many more, this book celebrates over 50 women who have shattered the glass ceiling, defied racial discrimination, and pioneered in their fields. In these profiles, young readers will find role models, inspirations, and maybe even reasons to be the STEM leaders of tomorrow. These stories help young readers to dream big and stay curious. The book includes endnotes, a bibliography, and an index"--
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Summary

Summary

A celebratory and inspiring look at some of the most important black women in STEM

Award-winning author Tonya Bolden explores the black women who have changed the world of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) in America. Including groundbreaking computer scientists, doctors, inventors, physicists, pharmacists, mathematicians, aviators, and many more, this book celebrates more than 50 women who have shattered the glass ceiling, defied racial discrimination, and pioneered in their fields. In these profiles, young readers will find role models, inspirations, and maybe even reasons to be the STEM leaders of tomorrow. These stories help young readers to dream big and stay curious. The book includes endnotes, a bibliography, and an index.


Author Notes

Tonya Bolden is the author of ten books, including "Strong Men Keep Coming", "The Family Heirloom Cookbook", & "33 Things Every Girl Should Know". She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5--8--Bolden's broad view of STEM, including profiles of physicians and medical professionals, is aimed at middle grade readers interested in science careers. The book opens with a section ("In the Vanguard") devoted to black women who battled racism and discrimination following the Civil War. Rebecca Crumpler, who worked as a nurse, was born free in Delaware. She decided to move to Virginia right after the war to assist with the injured. Many women in the book earned pioneer status: the first to pass a state medical exam, graduate from medical college, practice medicine, or head a science department. Most poignant are the trailblazers whose discoveries, like a humane treatment for leprosy, resulted in their deaths from side effects of the experiment. The second section celebrates those who entered aviation, bacteriology, mathematics, and architecture. The third section features geneticists, marine biologists, and the inventor of the device to remove cataracts. Milestones that mark each era (the Declaration of Sentiments written in 1848 to advance women's rights; the passage of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 1964) are noted. Even though it is a pleasure to discover so many overlooked geniuses, including Angie Lena Turner King (Katherine Johnson's mentor), it's sobering to learn that only one percent of black women earned engineering degrees in 2015. VERDICT Bolden, a master of the collective biography, presents an impeccably-researched call to action, imploring black girls to fight the racial and gender imbalance that plagues the STEM field.--Patricia Aakre, P.S. 89, New York


Kirkus Review

African American women in the past and present have overcome racial and gender barriers to succeed in STEM fields.Bolden begins by providing background and context, explaining that traditionally STEM's definition did not include medical fields. Bolden, however, does include women from those areas, including Dr. Rebecca Crumpler, who "earned her MD in 1864four years before black people in America had citizenship." Dr. Crumpler, like many discussed, combined her scientific knowledge with a commitment to serve the community. In the period after the Civil War that saw the establishment of black colleges, many of the subjects received degrees and taught in those schools. Following Plessy v. Ferguson, some worked in the institutions available to serve blacks. While there are obvious similarities in the stories presented, there were also some unique situations, such as Ida Gray Nelson Rollins'. The first black woman doctor of dental surgery, she came to the field after working for two white dentists who encouraged her. Many more were mentored by other African Americans who recognized their talents. Contemporary biographees include video game developers, computer scientists, and a founder of a nonprofit organization that encourages black girls to learn coding. Bolden's lively text, accompanied by archival images, underscores the importance of sharing these stories to understand the long tradition of black women striving in these areas.A worthy addition to the effort to tell a more complete and compelling American history. (source notes, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 10-14) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

This sweeping collective biography of American Black women in STEM careers brings the wide variety of their achievements into focus for middle-graders in this work by Coretta Scott King Honor Book author Bolden (Inventing Victoria, 2019). Including women from professions as diverse as computer science, marine biology, chemical engineering, and the medical sciences, each figure is given a few pages worth of description of their early personal life, educational pursuits, and career highlights, making for a somewhat formulaic approach to each woman's biography. Though the profiles necessarily lack detail, Bolden more than makes up for it in the variety of women featured, from the mid-1800s to today and including many unfamiliar names, such as video game developer Lisette Titre-Montgomery or marine biologist Joan Murrell Owens. Pullouts of vocabulary etymologies, quotes, and plenty of pictures of its subjects help bolster the biographies. Young people are sure to find intriguing role models among the many STEM all-stars in this comprehensive look at the achievements of gifted Black scientists and doctors. Final art not seen.


Table of Contents

Rebecca Davis Lee CrumplerRebecca J. ColeHalle Tanner Dillon JohnsonEliza Anna GrierMary Eliza MahoneySarah E. GoodeJosephine Silone YatesIda Gray Nelson RollinsAlice Augusta BallAnna Louise JamesWilla Beatrice BrownRuth Ella MooreMartha Euphemia Lofton HaynesAlfreda Johnson WebbJane HintonGeorgia Louise Harris BrownAngie Lena Turner KingMyra Adele LoganFlemmie KittrellCarolyn Beatrice ParkerMarie Maynard DalyJane Cooke WrightAnnie EasleyYvonne Young ClarkAngella Dorothea FergusonJessie Isabelle PriceBessie BlountGeorgia Mae DunstonJoan Murrell OwensJune Bacon-BerceyPatricia Suzanne CowingsMamie ParkerShirley Ann JacksonPatricia E. BathDonna AugustePamela McCauleyTreena Livingston ArinzehAyanna HowardPaula T. HammondAshanti JohnsonYasmin HurdPhyllis A. DenneryLisa D. WhiteEmma Garrison-AlexanderKimberly BryantAprille Joy EricssonLisette Titre-MontgomeryLatanya SweeneyPatrice BanksAomawa Shields
Alphap. 1
Part 1 In the Vanguardp. 5
General Practitionerp. 9
General Practitionerp. 14
General Practitioner & Institution Builderp. 16
Obstetrician-Gynecologistp. 18
Nursep. 22
Inventorp. 23
Science Educatorp. 24
Doctor of Dental Surgeryp. 26
Pharmaceutical Chemistp. 28
Pharmacistp. 32
Part 2 Riding the Wavep. 37
Aviatorp. 41
Bacteriologistp. 46
Mathematicianp. 47
Doctor of Veterinary Medicinep. 48
Doctor of Veterinary Medicinep. 48
Architectp. 50
Mathematician & Chemistp. 53
Medical Doctor, Surgeon & Researcherp. 56
Home Economistp. 58
Physicistp. 62
Biochemistp. 64
Oncologistp. 68
Mathematician & Computer Scientistp. 71
Mechanical Engineerp. 75
Pediatrician & Sickle Cell Anemia Researcherp. 79
Veterinary Microbiologistp. 82
Nurse, Physical Therapist, Inventor & Forensic Scientistp. 83
Part 3 Onward!p. 87
Geneticistp. 91
Marine Biologistp. 95
Meteorologistp. 98
Psychophysiologist & Inventorp. 101
Biologist & Environmentalistp. 103
Physicistp. 107
Ophthalmologist, Laser Scientist & Inventorp. 112
Electrical Engineer, Computer Scientist, Data Scientist & Entrepreneurp. 117
Industrial Engineerp. 121
Biomedical Engineerp. 126
Roboticistp. 128
Chemical Engineerp. 131
Geochemist & Chemical Oceanographerp. 134
Neurobiologyp. 138
Neonatologistp. 141
Geologist & Micropaleontologistp. 148
Cybersecurity Professionalp. 148
Electrical Engineer & Founder of Black Girls Codep. 151
Aerospace Engineerp. 154
Video Game Developerp. 160
Computer Scientist & Data Scientistp. 162
Mechanicp. 166
Astronomer & Astrobiologistp. 168
Omegap. 173
Notesp. 176
Selected Sourcesp. 195
Acknowledgmentsp. 196
Image Creditsp. 198
Indexp. 200